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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    It's extended periods where they child is really distressed that upsets people.

    The book doesn't tell you to leave a baby who is distressed, its based on allowing says babies to grizzle or protest while they learn to self settle. If they are distressed, go in and help them settle. I'm unsure where my copy is, but I can get some quotes for you on this from the book contents, unless anyone else with a copy can find them for me.

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  3. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    In the book, she says that to teach a 2 week old baby to sleep that you should put them in bed, make a cup of tea and drink it. She says to be prepared for crying. She says if the baby is still awake and crying after 20 minutes then go in, but more often than not the baby will be asleep. Now if that's not CIO, then I don't know what is!

    Anyway, I don't understand how someone can put a newborn baby in her routine. Babies do wake up. Their stomachs are a lot smaller than ours, it's just common sense that they should wake. It's part of being a parent. I don't like the idea of introducing solids just to make a baby sleep either. I have heard of sleep specialists recommending this from as young as 6 weeks to get babies to sleep through. No way in hell!

    Whilst I don't believe in this book, I did have a consistent night time routine with all 3 of my babies from birth that included bath, feed, bed. My children could put themselves to sleep from 3 months, some even earlier. After having 3 babies, I learnt that every one of them is different. But I was lucky enough to have babies that slept well at night time, with only a few rough patches here and there. All my babies have had dummies and not woken for them. I've never done a dream feed with any of my babies.

    I can totally understand parents who are absolutely desperate after months and months of night wakings who are willing to do anything to get more sleep, but I just don't understand why people would implement her methods on young babies.
    Of course babies wake up, but waking every hour/not sleeping for several hours through the night is torture... for both mum & bub. How can you not understand that showing a baby how to get themselves back to sleep after one cycle is good for them? Babies need lots of sleep. Dd2 is so much more content and interactive during her awake timed now than before we implemented a routine.

  4. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by lemonpancakes View Post
    I think there are two or three types of people when it comes to sleep deprivation: some can handle it fine, others struggle and a third group really really struggle with it. I'm in the latter group and there's no way I could be a good parent existing on very little sleep so for me, sleep training is a must.

    I'm lucky I had several friends go through it before me so I could see how happy, healthy and content their sleep-trained kids are. I never worried I'd be hurting my DD by getting her into a good routine. I never left her to cry and she slept through from 11 weeks. It's all about routine and spacing out the feeds to 4 hourly.

    I also think it's really hard training a kid to sleep when they're breastfed and for me the benefits of sleep (for baby and parent) outweigh the slight benefits of BF, so I'll be formula feeding my next baby.
    My exclusively bf baby was my best sleeper as a newborn. She slept 7-11 hours over night, occasionally longer.

  5. #104
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    Horses for courses, whatever works for you.

    I read it while pregnant and it's not for me, i do have friends who follow it very closely. I feel that it teaches parents to go against their own instincts, especially in regards to leaving a very young baby to cry. I don't believe babies can manipulate you.

    I have a terrible sleeper, who fed constantly for a long time. I feel like there is a big obsession when you become a parent to get your child to sleep through as early as possibly. Babies do need routines, but they aren't robots and they are all different. Some babies need closer contact than others, some are naturally better sleepers. I know tizzie hall works for a lot of parents and each to their own. The suggested routines are a good guide. It's not for me though, not by a long shot, i don't believe in any form of controlled crying/keeping to strict schedules all the time. I've been at friends houses when i can hear the baby screaming and they say " oh its ten to 3, he can't have his bottle till 3" when they finally go to get the baby, he's screaming with a red face and tears. Doesn't align with my parenting philosophy.

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  7. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by redlipsandpearls View Post
    Of course babies wake up, but waking every hour/not sleeping for several hours through the night is torture... for both mum & bub. How can you not understand that showing a baby how to get themselves back to sleep after one cycle is good for them? Babies need lots of sleep. Dd2 is so much more content and interactive during her awake timed now than before we implemented a routine.
    I'm not talking about implementing a routine, I said I used a routine from birth if you read my post that you quoted properly. It just didn't involve making a cup of tea whilst listening to my babies cry!

  8. #106
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    It's not SOS or complete pandamonium!

    Those of us who don't baby train, aren't doing our children a disservice. We have content, interactive children. We just think the book is rubbish and potentially quite dangerous.

    Sorry, @redlipsandpearls, I think you're great but we'll just have to agree to disagree on this one and that's cool!

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  10. #107
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    Faaark! I'm bowing out because I've read SOS twice front to back and skimmed over parts several times but must have been reading a different version to most of you that disagree with SOS.

  11. #108
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    Can i ask a question about tizzie hall's sleep training. What do you do when your baby pulls to stand in the cot? i've always wondered how that works. My fella would do laps of the cot from 7 months, even in a sleeping bag and there is just no way he'd ever lie down and put his head down and go to sleep. Probably only if i left him to scream for an hour and it was out of sheer exhaustion (which i'd never do). Prob another thread, but have always wondered.

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  13. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by redlipsandpearls View Post
    Faaark! I'm bowing out because I've read SOS twice front to back and skimmed over parts several times but must have been reading a different version to most of you that disagree with SOS.
    Page 72 from memory. Read it again. She says to make a cup of tea and leave your 2 week old baby to cry in bed while you sit down and drink your tea.

  14. #110
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    I don't think there is anywhere in the book that says leave a 2 week old to cry for 20 minutes while you have a cup of tea.
    From memory it says leave a baby to grizzle for 3 mins maximum then go in and settle them to sleep. But don't perpsist beyond 20 minutes if they don't sleep.

    as I said I don't agree with it especially for a baby under 6 weeks.

    and r.e the formula feeding breeding better sleepers that isn't true. Sleeping through the night is rarely about hunger and is developmental. In fact on average parent of breastfed newborns get more sleep than formula fed infants.

    babies are meant to wake through the night, it's normal and protective against SIDS

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