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  1. #11
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    @VicPark we don't really follow a routine. I loosely follow the feed play (feed) sleep routine. He doesn't tend to sleep for long without bein in my arms though.


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  2. #12
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    Ds2 has done thus a few times but mostly when he is teething.
    Took a week of walking him to sleep in the sling but he got over it and went back to feeding to sleep.
    Still doing it at 14 months.

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    We've gone through stages of not wanting to feed to sleep. My DS is the same, if he doesn't fall asleep on the boob he pretty much won't go to sleep. I end up having to just hold him while he cries until he eventually goes to sleep But for some reason, he will settle for daddy so I usually hand over bed time to DF if he won't feed to sleep.

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    It could just be a breastfeeding strike? Is he still properly feeding during that bed time feed? Still keep offering him the feed and see if he falls back into settling on the b00b.

    DS has had many breastfeeding strikes over his 20 months. He's still fed to sleep for his night sleep but we've just weaned him off his nap b 00bie. Even then he wasn't keen on the idea of no b00b.

    ETA there's also a sleep regression around 4 months of age, perhaps he's still getting used to his different sleep pattern. Worth looking into.

    The only way I could get DS to sleep when he was that age was to walk around with him if he wouldn't feed to sleep. He still needed that close comfort.
    Last edited by Taiyed; 14-04-2014 at 18:57.

  5. #15
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    Just a genuine polite question from a clueless newb. ..Why do people have a problem with babies nursing to sleep?

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    SpecialPatrolGroup is offline T-rex is cranky until she gets her coffee.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azvanna View Post
    Just a genuine polite question from a clueless newb. ..Why do people have a problem with babies nursing to sleep?
    As someone who feed to sleep, the things that I heard were that you can't leave them with anybody else, are you going to feed them to sleep forever, it is bad for their teeth, and just general comments about making a rod for your back. For the most part, this is all rubbish. Dd would go to sleep for others, has lovely teeth, decided to drop feeding of her own accord and is my child so she could never be a rod for my back

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    Azvanna  (02-07-2014),HollyGolightly81  (01-07-2014),Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (01-07-2014)

  8. #17
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    Because it can cause a sleep association of only being able to get to sleep by feeding. So if they wake after a sleep cycle (usually 45 mins later) they may need to feed to sleep again since that's how they initially fell asleep. Same issue with a dummy, rocking, etc.

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  10. #18
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    I have fed to sleep, but stopped at about 3/4 months and taught to self settle gently.

    9pm is quite a late bedtime. Maybe he's too tired by then and that's why he's fussy?

    ETA - this is a bit old. How are you op?
    Last edited by BigRedV; 01-07-2014 at 05:52.

  11. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azvanna View Post
    Just a genuine polite question from a clueless newb. ..Why do people have a problem with babies nursing to sleep?
    Nursing to sleep is natural and normal. In today's world though we are obsessed with sleeping through and self settling and have unrealistic expectations on when this should happen naturally. We try and "encourage" it to happen as soon as possible (not necessarily a bad thing).

    For the record I never fed to sleep as I wanted to avoid negative sleeping associations - she was still mostly a crap sleeper lol. I started feeding to sleep when we hit the 8 month sleep regression as there was no other way I could get her to sleep. It was a lifesaver over the next two months. Then she went back to self settling on her own.
    Last edited by Little Miss Sunshine; 01-07-2014 at 05:54.

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  13. #20
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    I guess it depends how badly you want to stop? If you want things to dramatically change then yes you need to stop feeding to sleep. About 5 months old is when my dd stopped feeding to sleep, because like you it just wasn't working for her anymore, it would make her more awake and so I started to wean her from feeding to sleep. It took a good 3-4 weeks and a few tears but essentially I had to establish a routine and switch her feeds to mid play ( in a quiet room). She got there and now goes down between 6-7pm, dreamfeeds a 9pm and then feeds again 5am back down til 8am. She is much happier as a result. Things I did were: use whatever else it took to get her to sleep (other than boob), this included driving in the car, rocking, singing, reading books just anything to show her she could do it without boobie plus used white noise and then I gradually weaned her from those things to placing in cot and patting, to no patting. It was a long tiresome process but the best thing I ever did. I should add that this is what worked for me and my family and may not work for others. Good luck OP, if you want any good books I can give you some names.

    Addit: just realised this thread is really old so probably pointless reply.
    Last edited by Soon2be4; 01-07-2014 at 06:13.


 

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