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  1. #111
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    Exactly right @VicPark! a year isn't much, especially at a federal budget level

  2. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mum2b87 View Post
    It shouldn't be any difference!
    Umm... If you work (in paid employment) less than someone else yes it should be... You can't expect $$ for nothing.

  3. #113
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    How much do you think it is?

    Take out a five-year career break - a year off for the first child, then part-time work for two years, another year off for the second child and another year of part time work - and she will be $232,500 short.

    Women with no spouse or partner, little or no superannuation who have had extended time out of the workforce to care for children - or, increasingly, older parents - are particularly vulnerable to poverty, because many struggle to get back into the workforce. This includes women who would consider themselves highly qualified and ''middle class''.

    http://m.smh.com.au/money/women-1m-poorer-in-retirement-20130702-2pa0k.html

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  5. #114
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    Average super for women $95k, compared to men's $210k
    Blamed on break women take to look after children

    "The career break isn't going away - someone has to raise the next generation," she said in a statement on Wednesday.

    "We need to direct our policy focus so that women can do more than simply tread water with their super during this period."

    The institute has argued that paid parental leave should include a superannuation component and that a 'super baby bonus' could go some way to addressing the issue.

    http://mobile.news.com.au/finance/superannuation/mothers-on-career-break-still-losing-super/story-e6frfmdi-1226319393052

  6. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by kw123 View Post
    How much do you think it is?

    Take out a five-year career break - a year off for the first child, then part-time work for two years, another year off for the second child and another year of part time work - and she will be $232,500 short.

    Women with no spouse or partner, little or no superannuation who have had extended time out of the workforce to care for children - or, increasingly, older parents - are particularly vulnerable to poverty, because many struggle to get back into the workforce. This includes women who would consider themselves highly qualified and ''middle class''.

    http://m.smh.com.au/money/women-1m-p...702-2pa0k.html
    Sorry but if you go part time or have extended time off then having less $$ (to me) is a reasonably forseeable and acceptable outcome. Want more super? Take less time off.

    If someone is partnered then they have some access to the partners/ex partners super. If someone isn't partnered when they have kids then they have to accept if they take extended time off then they Weill have less $$ in the super kitty.

    Extended time off is good but it isn't necessary. If you chose that way, you chose the consequences.

    I'm over people expecting $$ for nothing. You can't play in the non income generating domain and expect to be showered with cash.
    Last edited by VicPark; 30-04-2014 at 19:14.

  7. #116
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    Honestly, I'm not too worried about the super, I would rather the money to help pay off the mortgage, which is probably the better investment for retirement.

  8. #117
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    @VicPark I sincerely hope you are not putting me in the category of people who want something for nothing.

    I'm not advocating people getting paid super who don't work. I'm merely highlighting the financial disadvantage that women face through having necessary time out of the workforce to have babies. Super needs to form part of PPL - most decent organisations with their own paid schemes already do this. It's the same principle as getting super while you are on annual leave.

    While on unpaid parental leave we paid super into my account to the amount if would have been had I been at work. Not everyone could afford to do that.

    I know you don't think that gender disadvantage and discrimination exists but it's really not a matter of opinion. It's fact. And you are wrong.

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  10. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    It's not like women are left in the lurch.

    If women are still with their hubbies they get support through their super. If they have split from their hubbies then they are entitle to a share of the super that accrued while they were together.
    What about working on reducing the gender gap?
    Maybe then women wouldn't have to rely on anyone but themselves.

  11. #119
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    Paid super while on what length of ppl?

  12. #120
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    What ever the PPL is, whether that's 18 or 26 weeks.


 

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