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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uniquey View Post
    My Mum had stage 4 cervical cancer and was given 3 months to live, however fortunately she survived and is now ok. Her Cervical cancer was not a direct result of HPV which can often be the cause of cervical cancer etc. As a result, my sister and I have to have yearly pap smears (which we do) and I am not anti-vax, however, like Roopee, I will not be allowing my 4 daughters to have the Gardisal Vax, so I guess I'm an irresponsible parent too, however.. I will be teaching them about sexual health so that they will be well aware of HPV and other sexual health issues and hope that they are responsible for their sexual health choices etc.
    Could I respectfully ask why you won't be allowing your daughters to be vaccinated, especially since barrier contraception is not an effective prophylaxis against HPV, which is also a leading cause of head and throat cancers.

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  3. #12
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    Apparently it's still not enough! Correlation study only not double blind with proper control measures.

    But if ONE reaction is noted to any vaccine that is enough to refuse all further vaccines, double standards much?!

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  5. #13
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    HPV vaccine effective for Danish women
    February 27, 2014 - 06:43
    The HPV vaccine against cervical cancer was introduced in Denmark in 2006. New research shows that it is already working as it should and has significantly reduced the risk of cervical precursor lesions.
    Keywords: Cancer, Diseases, Health, Prevention, The Body
    SendPDFPrint
    By: Kristian Sjøgren

    Good news for women: the HPV vaccine works. New research shows that there are significantly fewer cases of cervical precursor lesions in vaccinated women than in non-vaccinated women. (Photo: Shutterstock)
    The vaccine against the dreaded human papillomavirus (HPV), which can trigger the development of cervical cancer, has proved effective in Denmark.

    So concludes a new study of the incidence of cervical precursor lesions in Danish girls and women who have been vaccinated with the HPV vaccine Gardasil.

    The study is the first of its kind where scientists study the nationwide difference in the incidence of cervical precursor lesions among vaccinated and non-vaccinated women.

    The results show that for women born between 1989 and 1999, there have been significantly fewer cases of cervical precursor lesions for vaccinated women than for their non-vaccinated counterparts.

    Professor Susanne Krüger Kjær, MD, of the Danish Cancer Society and the Copenhagen University Hospital, explains:

    The special thing about Denmark in this context is that we were very quick to implement the HPV vaccine nationwide. This is why we have managed to carry out such a comprehensive study of the effect of the HPV vaccine so soon.Susanne Krüger Kjær
    “Our study reveals a reduction of between 40 and 80 percent of cervical precursor lesions in vaccinated women compared to non-vaccinated women. We assume that this figure also applies to the risk of subsequent development of the disease.”

    The study is published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

    Denmark has unique health registers
    Using a cohort study design, the researchers identified all girls and women born in Denmark in the period 1989-1999 and obtained information on individual HPV vaccination status in the period 2006-2012 from nationwide registries.

    The study is particularly interesting as it is only a few years since the HPV vaccine was implemented in the Danish vaccination programme, and seeing such a marked effect after only six or seven years is remarkable:

    “The special thing about Denmark in this context is that we were very quick to implement the HPV vaccine nationwide. This is why we have managed to carry out such a comprehensive study of the effect of the HPV vaccine so soon,” says Kjær.
    Fewer cervical cancer cases in the future

    Although some cervical precursor lesions never develop into cervical cancer, the significant reduction in the number of women with cervical precursor lesions will also lead to a reduction in the number of actual cancer cases in the future, she says:

    “We cannot say anything with certainty yet, but I do expect that the group of women born between 1989 and 1999 who received the HPV vaccine will experience far fewer cases of cervical cancer when they reach an age at which the disease typically develops, which is in ten to 20 years’ time.”

    -------------------

    http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/conte...i.djt460.short

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  7. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roopee View Post
    I've copy/pasted this from the article- there are some bias's with this study (note the bolded bit) so I remain unconvinced and happy to stay one of those "truly irresponsible" parents. My kids, both boys AND girls will not be getting it.

    Competing interests: All authors have completed the ICMJE uniform disclosure form at www.icmje.org/coi_disclosure.pdf (available on request from the corresponding author) and declare: no support from any organisation for the submitted work. SBL has received research grants, travel funds, and payments from Merck, GSK, and BioCSL. JMLB has been a co-investigator on Australian HPV epidemiology grants that have received partial unrestricted funding from BioCSL and Merck. The University of Queensland receives royalties from the sale of Gardasil (Merck).
    Why have you bolded the last part? Do you expect someone to spend 30 years of their life researching, studying, developing, trialling etc etc a vaccine and then receive no money when they need someone else to bulk manufacture it? Do you know anything about commercialisation?

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  9. #15
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    Yes, you're right John C, HPV can cause, throat, a$nal and head cancers.

    Ever since it was introduced, I have been impressed that there was such a vaccine, however, the following points are my reasons for notwanting my daughters to have it.

    I am quite happy with Pap smears for Cervical cancer checks. Gardisal is for HPV, not cervical cancer.

    It's not been around long enough, don't know the future if any repercussions. I wouldn't want any future problems with their fertility.

    HPV, is an STD, so like any STD's or STI's I want them to be responsible for their sexual health and in an ideal world, would hope they are in a monogamous relationship.

    Doesn't it only cover 4 strains of the virus.

    And I guess, just a gut feeling.
    Last edited by Mod-Uniquey; 05-03-2014 at 18:56.

  10. #16
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    I guess the only problem with that reasoning - is that HVP is one of those awful things, where most people have it - 80% of the sexually active population - but no where near that many know they have it. It's kind of like herpes -80% of the population have it - it is really hard not to get it.

    Anyhow - I can understand that it is a new vaxx, and I can understand why people feel uncomfortable getting them before they have been around for awhile.

    Quote Originally Posted by Uniquey View Post
    Yes, you're right John C, HPV can cause, throat, a$nal and head cancers.

    Ever since it was introduced, I have been impressed that there was such a vaccine, however, the following points are my reasons for notwanting my daughters to have it.

    I am quite happy with Pap smears for Cervical cancer checks. Gardisal is for HPV, not cervical cancer.

    It's not been around long enough, don't know the future if any repercussions. I wouldn't want any future problems with their fertility.

    HPV, is an STD, so like any STD's or STI's I want them to be responsible for their sexual health and in an ideal world, would hope they are in a monogamous relationship.

    Doesn't it only cover 4 strains of the virus.

    And I guess, just a gut feeling.

  11. #17
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    Yes Beebs, at the crux of it for me, is that it is so new, but as I said earlier, I am impressed of it's existence and love that Australia has such amazing an talented Scientists etc that come up with these vaxes in the first place.

  12. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uniquey View Post
    Doesn't it only cover 4 strains of the virus.
    Yes (though there is a nonovalent formulation in the pipeline). However, we know that two of those strains are directly responsible for at least 50% of cervical and ano-genital cancers.

    eta: Forgot to mention "cross-protection", which means the vaccine also protects against related oncogenic strains, the most important of which are HPV 31 and 45, which account for a further 10% of cervical cancer cases.
    Last edited by JohnC; 05-03-2014 at 19:47. Reason: added cross-protection

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