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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    I don't think big baby always = c-section.

    My son was 4.85kg and I delivered him with no interventions or drugs. Did not tear either.

    My smallest was my emergency c-section due to transverse lie.
    Yep, I agree. It's often a culmination of things which don't seem clear or necessary at the time, but in hindsight you can see. Even if they come and explain things after the birth, it's too hard to take everything in when it's only just happened.

    My biggest baby was 9.5 pounds, and least complicated labour. My first three were vaginal births, with the third being delivered on the way to theatre for a c-sec.
    My fourth however was breech, and was manually turned at 37 weeks so I could avoid a c-sec, with an induction booked for the 38th wk due to my complex medical issues.
    At 37 wks and 6 days (induction the next day) I started bleeding very heavily. Ambulance rushed me to hospital, with me having regular contractions. Was taken to delivery where they felt we could continue with the labour despite the bleeding, as bub was ok.
    They broke my waters, and blood just gushed all over the doctor and floor. Bub's heart rate dropped, so it was off for a c-sec. I had a spinal block done immediately, as it works faster than an epidural, and within seconds they had made the cut.
    They were worried over the spinal working properly due to my damaged spine, and I felt a stinging with the cut but couldn't bear not seeing bub born and making sure he was ok, so didn't say anything. I have a very high pain tolerance, so figured I'd get through it for bub.
    But when they put their hands in to get him out, I felt everything tearing in a white hot pain from my belly button up. Apparently I sucked my breath in and screwed my eyes shut, so the anaesthetist (who knew what I could tolerate) told them to stop, and promptly put the gas on my face while pressing down on the artery in my neck to knock me out.

    I was lucky, as I would have pushed as long as possible to have a vaginal birth as bubs heart rate actually steadied in the op theatre, so felt a bit cheated afterwards. However, that lasted for 5 seconds, as bub was in NICU after having been resuscitated at birth. So he had a normal heart rate, but in fact he was literally drowning in the blood from a torn placenta. He ended up in NICU for a month.

    So for me, from the moment that bleeding started there is no way my body could have done anything differently. I still feel sadness that I missed my sons birth totally, but am thankful that the c-section saved his life.

    There isn't enough info available on all the reasons a c-section might be needed, and not enough people saying that a c-sec is simply another form of birth, such as breech, homebirth etc.
    And I think new mums should be offered counselling before leaving the hospital. What's needed is maybe a midwife who is very much respectful of mums choices in feeding etc, and is very knowledgeable and informed about all the things that can happen in labour and birth, and has empathy no matter the situation.
    I would have loved this, with all of my births. For someone like the above, who has read my file and knows what birth I had, and to talk, discuss and allow me to celebrate or cry on how the experience was for me.
    Imagine how much sadness and guilt mums could offload, and how much it would help in the weeks to come.

  2. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to mamaof4 For This Useful Post:

    LizNeal  (10-02-2014),munchkin275  (20-06-2014),Que Sera  (20-06-2014)

  3. #12
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    I had PE and was admitted for observation at 37+3 on the sat. Bub stopped showing the elevations they like on the CTG on tues so I was booked for an induction on wed morning. Was observed overnight on CTG and put on drop after waters broken at 6.30am wed morning. As soon as I had even the slightest contraction bubs HB plummeted so I was whisked off for emergency csec. My placenta was in pieces and bub had suffered foetal maternal hemorrhaging so had very low blood. Lucky we got her out. I hadn't read anything about csec either cause pregnancy was completely risk free until that sat I was diagnosed with the PE. I felt horribly upset, blamed myself and still feel rubbish that I didn't get the birth I wanted. However if I didn't have a csec at the point I had it she would've died so I'm very grateful at the same time.

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  5. #13
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    My first was a c section. I was fully dilated but had one spot if excruciating pain in my pelvis that wasn't touched by the epidural. About 3 hours after getting to 10cm bub was starting to get distressed, dr did a VE and discovered his head was presenting transverse and he was jammed in my pelvis. Vacuum was tried but we ended up with a c section.

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  7. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mamaof4 View Post
    There isn't enough info available on all the reasons a c-section might be needed, and not enough people saying that a c-sec is simply another form of birth, such as breech, homebirth etc.
    And I think new mums should be offered counselling before leaving the hospital. What's needed is maybe a midwife who is very much respectful of mums choices in feeding etc, and is very knowledgeable and informed about all the things that can happen in labour and birth, and has empathy no matter the situation.
    I would have loved this, with all of my births. For someone like the above, who has read my file and knows what birth I had, and to talk, discuss and allow me to celebrate or cry on how the experience was for me.
    Imagine how much sadness and guilt mums could offload, and how much it would help in the weeks to come.
    I agree. I think that counselling would be so powerful if it were available in those days following an unplanned c-section.

    { Text removed by Moderator }
    Last edited by Mod-RaryGirl; 10-02-2014 at 21:01.

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    Thanks to everyone who shared their story.

  10. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by LizNeal View Post
    I agree. I think that counselling would be so powerful if it were available in those days following an unplanned c-section.

    { Text removed by Moderator }
    Yes, agree
    I actually did have counselling with a private counsellor, luckily got a referral from my GP and I fully recommend anyone in the same situation to go for it if they are even thinking of needing to talk to someone.
    It helped enormously but with an elective CS looming I am still very nervous.

    I had everything I didn't want - induction as I was overdue and apparently in labour, too many VE's to even count or remember, epidural which didn't work. Got to 8cm, ended with bubs in distress and turns out she was never going to come out vaginally as her head was flexed and jammed up against my pelvic bone. Cue emergency CS under GA. She was 9lb10oz.

    BUT - we are forever grateful to the Dr who made the call to go to cs as our girl wouldn't be here otherwise.

    It was traumatic, and I do feel a sense of loss at not having a VB but at the end of the day we were both safe and healthy and that's all that mattered.
    Last edited by mrsviking; 10-02-2014 at 21:11. Reason: added bubs size

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  12. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by LizNeal View Post
    I agree. I think that counselling would be so powerful if it were available in those days following an unplanned c-section.
    See that's exactly what the maternity wards need. So many women are discharged feeling lost and unsure of what they are doing, and having birth trauma on top of that would make you feel completely out to sea.

    Im actually surprised that none of the hospitals have even considered it. I mean, my antenatal clinic had a social worker, who was also supposed to vist every mum at least once, when on the ward.
    We had gone through a very hard time, losing our house and most belongings, plus my serious medical condition, plus DH losing his job and struggling to find another. And that was the stuff I actually coped with, there was a lot more. But the social worker saw us for five minutes, and gave us a leaflet on low interest loans-which we were not eligible for.
    So I couldn't see how she could be of any help to the new mums who may have had a traumatic birth, especially when I didn't see her on the ward once during the full week I was there.
    Last edited by Mod-RaryGirl; 10-02-2014 at 22:38.

  13. #18
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    I never ever considered a c-section, but my daughter had a true knot so as she came down the birth canal it pulled tight and her heart rate dropped dramatically. I will NEVER forget how I felt while they ran through the hallways screaming at people to get out of the way on our way to theatre.

    I wish they prepared people more about c-sections... I had such a perfect pregnancy that ended very badly. Thankfully the overall outcome was good, but it was so incredibly close to very bad.

  14. #19
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    DS was stuck so technically failure to progress after 48 hours in labour. I had every intervention under the sun and I don't think that helped things and made my labour so much worse.

    Im pregnant with #2 and have been given the go ahead for a VBAC provided I don't go past 40 weeks. If I have another c section, I'm fine with that. I definitely think women should be prepared for it because it's really not such a scary thing to have a C and it would have relieved a lot of anxiety surrounding the procedure for me.

  15. #20
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    With my first I read everything I could get my hands on - I felt positive and strong for the birth and wanted to try for a drug-free natural birth. But I was also prepared for things not going as planned, and had the possibility of a caesarean in the back of my mind.

    After 18 hours of labour (with oxytocin to try to speed things up as I wasn't dilating past 1cm) I was tired but still strong. Unfortunately though I was still only 1cm dilated. So I was advised to have an emergency caesarean and although disappointed, I agreed.

    My second I was advised I would probably fail to progress again so I opted for an elective caesarean. I will be doing the same for this bub due in October.

    My children are all healthy and happy and have had no medical issues. Both caesareans I have been up within 12 hours, recovered amazingly well and lost the weight healthy afterwards. I have had friends and family who have had natural births and have had horrendous births and recoveries (some haven't recovered still, years after giving birth).

    I don't think caesarean births are the 'easy option' and I also don't feel a failure for not giving birth naturally. My babies were born however was right for them and with no health issues or trauma. I recovered with no long term issues and enjoying being their mummy. That's success to me :-)

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