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  1. #1
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    Default Over diagnosing ? Mental health issues

    Cut a long story short my mil has had "issues" with my teenage sil. To me her behaviour is a combination of typical teenage hormonal moods, spoilt brat syndrome ( finished school, doesn't work, can't get CL, mil says to get a job ,sil knows she just has to ask for stuff and gets it so doesn't bother working) and the fact mil never properly dealt with sil feelings and emotions after splitting up with her dad ( not DH dad) and getting pregnant and moving in with another man ( yes 3 kids 3 different dads).
    Anyway apparently sil was diagnosed ( at an expensive "clinic" which gets paid per day not one fee sort of deal) with a "mood" disorder so rather than deal with real issues mil is now blaming ( and using it) as an excuse for sil behaviour.

    I'm not doubting mental health issues I have suffered anxiety and mild pnd so I know they're real but I did see a quote on FB that drug companies don't make money from you being well. Thanks for letting me vent
    I am seeing more and more people being diagnosed with some label then using that as an excuse for poor behaviour ( if you know it's poor behaviour then it's not the disorder ).
    Please tell me I'm not the only one who is seeing this

  2. #2
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    No I don't think so. It's opinions like this that add to the stigma and make it scary and shameful for anyone to admit having mental health issues. I think kindness and empathy goes further then judgment and assumptions. I find it strange that you think you know more about her diagnosis then a mental health professional.

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  4. #3
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    I think I see where u are coming from op.

    She did say she doesnt doubt there are genuine mental health disorders but that sometimes people use it as an excuse for bad behavior and that drs can be quick to "label" everything rather than get to the root of the problem. Im sure that does happen.

    Def agree to an extent.

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    No I don't agree at all.

    Due to the stigma attached with being diagnosed with a mental illness (like those you have stated in your above post) people refuse to get help when they need it. A "mood" disorder as you have put it can have as much as impact on a persons life and those around them as another physical illness.

    All private psychiatric clinics that I am aware of charge by the day or by course take e.g Dialectical Behavioural Therapy. The one I am aware of is about $3300 a week (unless covered by private health cover).

    Some people wait weeks and weeks to get a diagnoses so that the right treatment can be commenced whether that is a drug regime or a combination of psychotherapy and drugs.

    There may be past trauma that has impacted on her mental health including that of her parents breaking up.

    Empathy and compassion how we should talk about mental illness not with blame and accusations!

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    And just for your info... I knew perfectly well my behaviour wasn't "right" or "normal" when I was unwell. In hospital I learnt a lot of skills to help me battle the distorted thoughts and help get my behaviour under control. It was really unhelpful when people would tell me "it was a choice" I made and I wasn't trying hard enough or to just snap out of it. It took my close to 2 years to battle myself out of that black hole. There is a lot of things I did and said when I was unwell that absolutely horrify me now but I've reached a place where I forgive myself and realised it wasn't me but the illness. It would be easier if others would see that but at the end of the day I can see how it would be hard to understand unless you've been there.

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  10. #6
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    Thank you for your input, as I said in my post I'm certainly not denying mental health issues exist. I too have experienced them, and have supported others who have them.
    Maybe because my short story wasn't so short it may have been lost in translation.
    What I have concerns about ( and used my story as an example, ps everyone but mil knows sil not and just using it as an excuse but I won't argue with you on this matter) is there seems to be labels and diagnosis, sometimes when it's not actually true or real issue.
    To me over diagnosing and labelling is causing the stigma, and that was the point I was trying to make,

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    Blessedwith3boys  (10-02-2014)

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    Which thus causes society to dismiss genuine cases, like the boy who cried wolf. Which then snowballs and prevents genuine cases from either seeking help or getting the help they need.

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    I agree that people with MI often have to endure many incorrect diagnoses before clinicians find the correct one but in my experience in Australia clinicians take time to diagnose and would prefer not to diagnose at all. They, as a whole, don't wish to prescribe medication for clients if they don't need to. Ethical practice in the mental health profession is high.

    I don't believe we are born with 'bad behaviour' and I do believe the majority of people want to behave in socially acceptable ways so when an adult or teen continues to act out I feel there is a need to look at answers and ongoing patterns of behaviour are a great indicator for many illnesses. It's what happens after the diagnosis which is the most telling thing. If you learn more about your sil's mood disorder it may help you, your sil and your mil.

    Stigma is caused by a mixture of things: ignorance, lack of knowledge, fear and negative fixed beliefs about MI. And just because a person has a MI doesn't mean they can't improve their quality of life or their behaviour. What is helpful to them most those is the support and reassurance of family and friends.
    Last edited by BbBbBh; 10-02-2014 at 11:48.

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    Ok, I'm going to agree and disagree. Most people I know have or have had some kind of mental health issues.

    Different doctors/specialists have suggested I have Bipolar, depression, anxiety, ADD, ADHD, OCD & personality disorders just to name a few.

    I am currently on an anti anxiety medication & it's working well.

    I disagree with the comment 'if you know it's wrong it not a disorder'. I knew lying in bed for days & crying was not normal, I new my impulsive behaviour was wrong, I knew my reactions to situations were completely unfounded, I just couldn't do anything about it! I wanted to, I wanted to so bad I ended up with a huge amount of guilt on top of everything else (which doesn't help either)

    I have great sympathy for people with mental illnesses because I know what a big impact it can have on your life. I'm pro drugs (if you need them to function) and pro therapy support.

    I've never once met a person with a mental illness and thought they were 'faking it' if you know what I mean. Only once have I seen a diagnosis make the condition worse (this person did really play it up after finding out they had ASD as an adult)

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    Quote Originally Posted by maternidade View Post

    I'm not doubting mental health issues I have suffered anxiety and mild pnd so I know they're real but I did see a quote on FB that drug companies don't make money from you being well. Thanks for letting me vent
    DH is a psychiatrist. He gets absolutely no money, kickback, benefits, etc for prescribing medication. So yes whilst I'm sure the drug companies want people buying their product, the doctor isn't getting a benefit for diagnosing an illness and prescribing a certain medication.

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