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  1. #11
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    You don't get systemic side effects from a local injection. It's injected to target a site of inflammation, and it's only one.

  2. #12
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    I've had this type of injection in my neck. The injury was between C4 and C5 and the injection was given under CT and through the front of my neck, slightly to the side due to the anatomy of the spine in that area it couldn't be given from the back.

    It worked well for me and within a few months I'd stopped taking all the medications I had been on before (Valium, anti-inflams, Lyrica for the nerve effects down my arm). But as PPs have said, I'm unsure about its safety during pregnancy.

    My GP arranged it all for me. He is a sports specialist and is brilliant.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeymourTheBear View Post
    You don't get systemic side effects from a local injection. It's injected to target a site of inflammation, and it's only one.
    Coricosteroids can give you systemic side effects from injections as well, but you probably need to have more than one for this to happen and perhaps at a high dose. My supervisor had to get a series of them for a neck injury and suffered the same kinds of systemic side effects as I did taking them orally, although this may be unlikely, I am only going by what he said.
    Last edited by Pearlygirl; 11-01-2014 at 22:28.

  4. #14
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    If you don't know what is causing the pain, I wouldn't be getting an injection in your neck, and I doubt a doctor would refer you to get one without at least an idea of the problem.
    Cortisone injections for localised pain are for specific injury mechanisms (such as to reduce swelling around a prolapsed intervertebral disc), if it's a muscular issue it won't do much for you.

    Get some more scans (maybe a us if other scans showed nothing), keep going with physio, because it can take a 4-8 weeks of regular visits and 'homework' to see an improvement, try hot and cold packs, and try something like voltaren gel.

  5. #15
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    A friend of mine had stetoids injections when she was pregnant but it was for something to do with her baby. I would def recommend seeing a pain specialist

  6. #16
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    Thanks for the info everyone, more to research & think about!

    Semourthebear, cold packs make it worse, heat only provides very temporary relief. Ive done physio for long periods (months on end) with no relief that lasted more than a day or two. Ive tried many different physios. I havent had a chance to ask my midwife if I can use voltaren gel, but I will at my next appointment

    Im looking at going to Queensland Pain Clinic after ive had my baby, so now to convince the GP to give me a referral.

    Sent from my SM-T210 using The Bub Hub mobile app

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to heartstringz For This Useful Post:

    SeymourTheBear  (12-01-2014)

  8. #17
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    The pain clinic sounds like the best option for you. You will be linked with a pain specialist then. Good luck!

  9. #18
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    Voltaren is not recommended during pregnancy. Use during the third trimester is linked with a heart defect when one of the valves fails to close (or closes prematurely can't remember which).

    It sounds like you really need to see a pain specialist, and hopefully work out the cause of your pain so you can get suitable treatment. If your GP won't refer, get another GP. Also start the process now because it may take awhile before you actually get to see someone.


 

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