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  1. #11
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    I am dealing with this at the moment. Sent DD to bed after she wouldn't eat her lunch. Ended up adding yoghurt to her dinner so she would eat it (only had a little bit too.) she would have had her lunch re-presented but I knocked it on the floor accidentally. The pigeons got it in the end. At least they appreciate my cooking. Most annoying thing is its usually her favourite food (pasta).

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    Mod-Degrassi  (08-01-2014)

  3. #12
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    Hi degrassi.
    My 4 yr old ds is a pretty good eater but yes like everyone we have our hard days. Our approach to dinner is simple
    1. Everyone sits together and eats the same thing
    2. If I serve something new, he has to try it, if he doesn't like it that's fine but he must try it
    3. If he doesn't eat his dinner then it gets put in the fridge - if he says he's hungry later then I pull his dinner out and he can eat that.
    4. If he eats all his dinner without fuss he can have something after tea (sometimes dessert but usually some fruit/weetbix etc)

    We don't make a huge fuss, if you don't eat it then go hungry. I've never made something else for him and both kids have always eaten what we have. Even curries etc (I pour milk in the kids to tone down the spiciness)

    I've also found that when he helps me cook dinner he is more inclined to eat it because he had helped make it. He does things like dipping chicken breast into the flour when in crumbing it, or putting things into the bowl/thermomix/saucepan etc

    Or I'll give him a taste of what I'm making whilst I'm cooking. Don't know why that works but he just seems happy to have a taste (I think because it's not sitting there in front of him and he HAS to eat it) and then he will usually say "yum can I have some more" to which I'll reply "it's for dinner and it will be ready soon so you can have some more at the table"
    Then when we go to the table he already knows he likes it so there's no fuss.

    Lots of praise when he does finish his plate and we always comment on how big his muscles are getting each time he finishes a meal - he loves that

    I hope that helps


    DH, Me and our two boys.
    Lost our little squirt 20/11/13.
    Last edited by lexim; 08-01-2014 at 12:44.

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    Mod-Degrassi  (08-01-2014)

  5. #13
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    What is the earliest toddlers will get a grip on the - you don't eat this (what's in front of them), you don't eat anything?

    DD is 22 months and if she doesn't eat her main meal (cooked especially for her due to intolerances and allergies) I just don't force it but give her yoghurt and fruit afterwards. I give her the yoghurt and fruit regardless of whether she eats her main meal as I don't want her waking in the night hungry.

    DH says to not even give her yoghurt and desert so she gets the idea, but I think she's too young.

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  7. #14
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    My ds1 is the same. Very limited diet and refuses to try new stuff.

    He turns 4 in 2 weeks and it's only now that I can start to reason with him a bit.

    6 months ago he would have refused to eat risotto. Last night I managed to get him to eat half a bowl. I tell him he has to eat 5 spoonfuls (and then I give him 10 and pretend it's only 5), and if he finishes that, he can have some fruit & a treat.

    It's not ideal, it takes forever, but at least he's eating. So I put up with it a bit.

    Hopefully in the next few months your LO starts to change as well.

    Ps I should also say that on nights that he doesn't cooperate, he gets nothing else.

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  9. #15
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    lexim is offline Winner 2013 - Newbie of the Year
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allie Pallie View Post
    What is the earliest toddlers will get a grip on the - you don't eat this (what's in front of them), you don't eat anything?

    DD is 22 months and if she doesn't eat her main meal (cooked especially for her due to intolerances and allergies) I just don't force it but give her yoghurt and fruit afterwards. I give her the yoghurt and fruit regardless of whether she eats her main meal as I don't want her waking in the night hungry.

    DH says to not even give her yoghurt and desert so she gets the idea, but I think she's too young.
    I think I've always done it. I can't recall DS ever waking up hungry in the night.
    And I think the fact that he's always known that's what happens it's just become normal
    He's a healthy little kid, right weight for his age/height so I know he's not 'under nourished' like I said, he's a good eater.

    You have to remember that they eat during the day as well and that dinner isn't their only meal, so skipping it will not kill them



    Try putting it in the fridge and bringing it out later if they complain


    DH, Me and our two boys.
    Lost our little squirt 20/11/13.

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    Mod-Degrassi  (08-01-2014)

  11. #16
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    My dd is only 18 months and the following has made a huge difference in her eating dinner:

    1. Eating at the table with DH and I for family dinner at 5.30

    2. No snacks from 4pm onwards, she is then begging for food at 5.30

    3. No eating other than her highchair. She would eat 1 thing then want to walk around the table. Or try to eat while playing around table. We took her food away and said eating in high chair only. She quickly learnt she had to sit and eat with us otherwise no food.

    4. No special meals, you eat what's served (all foods she likes) or nothing else. I emphasise this to her over and over.

    My friend said I was being too harsh, but this has improved her eating out of sight. Meanwhile my said friend runs a restaurant from her home kitchen cooking 3 meals for a family of 4, which I refuse to do.

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    Little Miss Sunshine  (09-01-2014)

  13. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allie Pallie View Post
    What is the earliest toddlers will get a grip on the - you don't eat this (what's in front of them), you don't eat anything?

    DD is 22 months and if she doesn't eat her main meal (cooked especially for her due to intolerances and allergies) I just don't force it but give her yoghurt and fruit afterwards. I give her the yoghurt and fruit regardless of whether she eats her main meal as I don't want her waking in the night hungry.

    DH says to not even give her yoghurt and desert so she gets the idea, but I think she's too young.
    We've done it from about ten months old - he sits with us, eats what we eat , thankfully so far we've never had a problem!
    I think she definitely knows she will always get yogurt afterwards so why eat her dinner? so maybe if she does not eat her dinner and wants food after give her back her dinner and not yogurt ?

  14. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by lexim View Post
    I think I've always done it. I can't recall DS ever waking up hungry in the night.
    And I think the fact that he's always known that's what happens it's just become normal
    He's a healthy little kid, right weight for his age/height so I know he's not 'under nourished' like I said, he's a good eater.

    You have to remember that they eat during the day as well and that dinner isn't their only meal, so skipping it will not kill them



    Try putting it in the fridge and bringing it out later if they complain


    DH, Me and our two boys.
    Lost our little squirt 20/11/13.
    There's usually not much time between her dinner and her bath before bed, so she would only have about 10 minutes to grab something else to eat. Maybe I should just try it one night and see what happens!

    Oh and sorry for hijacking your thread OP!
    Last edited by A-Squared; 08-01-2014 at 13:50.

  15. #19
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    Its hard. My DS who is 6 is only now open to trying new foods. At least 6mths ago, he would not touch veges like corn, peas, pumpkin and would very rarely eat his carrots. These days he eats or tries all of these and i do throw in brocolli and cauliflower for for him. He says he doesnt like them but i have been persistant in giving them to him.

    I struggled for years getting him to eat and he is quite small compared to many kids his age(in size) but he does his best. I am more relaxed about his eating than previously. I have vented here heaps about his eating.

    Hugs. Its hard but i do promise it will get easier.

    Sent from my GT-I9305T using The Bub Hub mobile app

  16. #20
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    ~Marigold~ is offline You make me happy, when skies are grey
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    My DD, 17 months, is a pretty good eater but has started to simply throw her food off of her highchair tray when she doesn't want to eat it. We tell her "no" but it makes no difference. Within seconds her entire meal has been swiped off her tray and onto the floor. She even does it with food she likes, like toast in the morning... drives me crazy.

    "Life Is Ours, We Live It Our Way".


 

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