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  1. #1
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    Default Is there any way to curb fussy eating habits in a toddler?

    Or am I stuck until DS gets older and 'grows out of it'?

    DH and I are becoming dismayed at the limited range of foods our almost 3 year old will eat. He would try almost anything when he was little and he enjoyed a variety of food.

    These days, his range of foods he will eat is declining. Things he used to happily eat, he will now not touch

    He flat out refuses to try new foods. It's very frustrating because I love cooking and trying new healthy recipes.

    I feel like we must have gone wrong somewhere. Most nights now he has the same sort of stuff for dinner because anything different is rejected and we end up giving him toast and extra cucumber/tomatoes so he doesn't go to bed hungry.

    He is a very lean build and I've never felt comfortable sending him to bed without any dinner. Am I being too soft?

    Some advice and tips would be greatly appreciated as I'm scared he'll start limiting his eating even further to the point that he'll only eat a couple of things.

  2. #2
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    I personally would not buy into it. Serve the food you were planning on for dinner. Sit down as a family and do not comment on, or discuss what he is eating or not eating. Have normal conversation. Serve the food on a platter on the table so he can serve himself from that.
    There is no food after dinner at our house, dinner is dinner, not something to be got through to get other food after.
    Unless he has special needs (like a sensory processing disorder or autism etc) then in my mind they eat if they are hungry, as long as there is varied food on offer and it is not too spicy or salty etc.

    Good luck.

  3. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to NoteToSelf For This Useful Post:

    hangingupsidedown  (09-01-2014),Mod-Degrassi  (08-01-2014),Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (08-01-2014),SoThisIsLove  (10-01-2014)

  4. #3
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    I had a 4 yr old son like that ate everything then one day rejected everything but boiled eggs and toast...I said to him if you cant eat what I make, tough.. theres nothing else, im not a restaurant.. I refused to make him his own meals because that was teaching him that he could get what ever he wanted ... he missed dinner a few times but he soon learnt .... he also realised he missed out on ice cream for desert if he didn't eat his dinner and for him that was a big deal lol... he also liked to have a milk and milo before bed and I told him only big boys who eat their dinner get milo so he could have plain milk or nothing... it was hard but the tough love approach worked. he is now 18, tall and lanky and weighs less that 50 kgs but he is healthy and happy and he eats almost everything... good luck.. stay strong and he will be fine, he wont fade away if he goes to bed without dinner.

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    Mod-Degrassi  (08-01-2014),~Marigold~  (08-01-2014)

  6. #4
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    ^^ def give that a try! My gf always gave her son what he wanted for dinner and was making separate meals and he is now the fussiest eater! She has to packed special lunches for him at daycare (food is provide for the kids) because he never sat down at the table and tried anything different

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    Mod-Degrassi  (08-01-2014)

  8. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoteToSelf View Post
    I personally would not buy into it. Serve the food you were planning on for dinner. Sit down as a family and do not comment on, or discuss what he is eating or not eating. Have normal conversation. Serve the food on a platter on the table so he can serve himself from that.
    There is no food after dinner at our house, dinner is dinner, not something to be got through to get other food after.
    Unless he has special needs (like a sensory processing disorder or autism etc) then in my mind they eat if they are hungry, as long as there is varied food on offer and it is not too spicy or salty etc.

    Good luck.
    Totally agree with this, my girlfriend went through the same thing when her DS turned 3, they stopped making dinner a fight and made it fun, if he ate he ate if not that's ok but if he said he was hungry they brought out the left over dinner, they always made sure there was something he liked , so maybe have a salad of cucumber and tomatoes at dinner with the other food and he can start with that, then hopefully will see you guys enjoying dinner and start trying it again

    I think it's him just trying to assert his independence and I think now is the time to try change his mindset or it will just get harder as he gets older

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    Mod-Degrassi  (08-01-2014)

  10. #6
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    My 3 year old DD was the exact same until about 2 months ago. I had posted threads before about how she would only eat 'dry' food, nothing saucy or mushy. Dinner most nights was crumbed chicken and carrot sticks. Before Xmas we told her that Santa only comes to little girls who try new foods, and started putting small amounts of 'saucy meals' on her plate. We made a rule that she has to at least try each new thing and slowly she had started eating normal meals. Maybe a sticker chart for each time he tries a bit of something he wouldn't normally eat?

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    Mod-Degrassi  (08-01-2014)

  12. #7
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    I don't have a three year old yet, so this is not from experience, but I have heard my MIL (a wise old Italian woman) say what PPs have said... basically...
    "Day 1, no eat, Day 2, no eat, Day 3, EAT!"

    And my view is that our bub will eat when he's hungry and I don't stress if he doesn't want to eat what's in front of him. He eats what we eat. The *only* time I've specifically made him something different for dinner was about a week ago when he had a very bad episode of teething and couldn't eat firm foods. He got a banana/prune smoothie... and almost swallowed the glass whole!

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    Mod-Degrassi  (08-01-2014)

  14. #8
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    With dogs, the answer is: there's food in your bowl, eat it or go hungry.

    I've never experienced this problem with DS (he currently eats essentially everything except beans, and everything includes rollmops and olives which he loves).

    But if I do, I'll be taking the same approach as with the dogs.

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to duncan_bayne For This Useful Post:

    Mod-Degrassi  (08-01-2014)

  16. #9
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    I'm feeling really positive about adopting a newer more hard line approach after reading the advice so far

    I think we've babied DS for too long by pandering to his fussiness. I think the fact that he usually eats dinner in the high chair with his own specially made meal and not at the table with us is where we've gone wrong too

    Our big boy will be sitting at the table with us from now on and will be served what we are having

  17. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Mod-Degrassi For This Useful Post:

    Elijahs Mum  (08-01-2014),Missy RJ  (08-01-2014),NoteToSelf  (08-01-2014),Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (08-01-2014)

  18. #10
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    Good luck degrassi. We have a one year old like this but I think he is too young yet to take this approach. It is so frustrating though!!!!


 

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