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  1. #31
    ~Marigold~'s Avatar
    ~Marigold~ is offline You make me happy, when skies are grey
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    I always believed that a "pure" bred dog was more likely to be aggressive or have behavioural problems? Because of the gene pool; like if a human had a baby with a relative, there are concerns regarding mental retardation etc...
    So is the issue more the history of "in breeding" to create a pure breed as opposed to the actual type of breed? If so I think this is where alot of the confusion lies... a pure bred poodle for eg could be just as dangerous/predisposed to attack as a pure bred pitbull- is that correct? This makes me question why pure bred pitbulls are the only banned breed.


    "Life Is Ours, We Live It Our Way".
    Last edited by ~Marigold~; 27-12-2013 at 19:09.

  2. #32
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    Op, I hope you're feeling ok. Last summer I went for a walk without my dog (he's no good in the heat) and a very similar thing happened. I was bitten by a small dog on the footpath. I actually think its person walking the dog that should veer off the path when passing someone, not walkers/ prams etc. it seems that people tolerate bad behaviour from little dogs much more than big dogs. I remember seeing that the most dog bites in Australia are from Maltese terriers!

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  4. #33
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    I've been reading about this a lot lately, some purebred breeds are considered especially gentle and fond of kids, like Bernese Mountain dogs and Basset Hounds. If you look at the stats - and stats don't lie, pitbulls are responsible for the most attacks even though they are a relatively small population compared with other dogs.

    Quote Originally Posted by ~Marigold~ View Post
    I always believed that a "pure" bred dog was more likely to be aggressive or have behavioural problems? Because of the gene pool; like if a human had a baby with a relative, there are concerns regarding mental retardation etc...
    So is the issue more the history of "in breeding" to create a pure breed as opposed to the actual type of breed? If so I think this is where alot of the confusion lies... a pure bred poodle for eg could be just as dangerous/predisposed to attack as a pure bred pitball- is that correct? This makes me question why pure bred pitballs are the only banned breed.


    "Life Is Ours, We Live It Our Way".

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  6. #34
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    Stats may not lie but they don’t always present an accurate picture either It really does depend on how the statistic was compiled and what type of information was used to construct it. Bull terrier dogs are routinely purchased for their “reputation” and are trained to match that reputation by their owners. Such dogs are found to be used for very volatile and high stress occupations such as pigging and guarding which increases the tendency to elicit aggressive behaviour. According to information collected by Councils and animal welfare groups, if you look at the type of owners who own such dogs you will be able to deduce that the owner of any dog has a huge impact on that dog’s behaviour.

    With all that said, Beebs’ post was misread. She didn’t mention breed. This was assumed by the proceeding poster. It pays to read what is actually written or to seek clarification if you’re not sure what the poster means.

    I
    am of the opinion that it’s definitely the owner’s responsibility to ensure that his/her dog does not lash out at people while in public. Depending on the ferocity of the attack this sometimes warrants the destruction of the animal. I would definitely report the incident and get a tetanus shot although the photo indicates to me a normal bodily response to broken skin.


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    [QUOTE=beebs;7601644]Where on earth did I say it was a breed issue. Maybe you should read my post. which said that some dogs are just aggressive - nothing to do with breed - dogs, not breed.

    I also said sometimes owners are to blame. This issue is obviously so close to you that you are clouded - I haven't said any of the things that you say I have.

    Please do show me the studies that prove that is not a breed issue. Because for every one you show me that it isn't, I bet I can find one that shows it is. Not saying that I believe these things necessarily. But there are certainly studies out there that show that certain breeds of dogs attack more regularly than other breeds. I was reading one the other day.[/QUOTE

    Some dogs are not naturally aggressive, they have weak owners that don't establish boundaries & educate their dog. Pure breed dogs & mixed bloodlines have no impact as I have owned, trained & studied both.

    Please don't confuse what I'm saying - you are right that a dog can show aggression but it's not a natural reaction unless this behaviour has gone unaddressed or the dog feels threatened.

    Children & dogs left alone is not on. It's because of my involvement that I am passionate (not clouded) about animal management. The more we are aware as parents the more we can teach our children & keep them safe.

    I teach children about body language, how to approach a dog & how their reactions are interpreted. I just want to make it clear because I very much hate reading about these dog attacks & believe we as humans are responsible for animal control & child safety.

    Just so you know, it's been proven that owners of specific breed dogs are not training these dogs properly & their genetic makeup makes them prime physical killers - not by nature. My cocker spaniel is born & bred to go after birds or drive out flocks for hunters.

    She can comfortably be around ducks, chickens - any bird at my hand & I can control her behaviour because I took the time to teach her. Sounds like this owner is just using a cop out by saying the dog doesn't like children & I feel so sad to hear OP was bitten because of this.

    Number one is that the owners are found by the council because they clearly didn't think their dog biting poor OP was more than a random accident.

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  10. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caviar View Post
    Stats may not lie but they don’t always present an accurate picture either It really does depend on how the statistic was compiled and what type of information was used to construct it. Bull terrier dogs are routinely purchased for their “reputation” and are trained to match that reputation by their owners. Such dogs are found to be used for very volatile and high stress occupations such as pigging and guarding which increases the tendency to elicit aggressive behaviour. According to information collected by Councils and animal welfare groups, if you look at the type of owners who own such dogs you will be able to deduce that the owner of any dog has a huge impact on that dog’s behaviour.

    With all that said, Beebs’ post was misread. She didn’t mention breed. This was assumed by the proceeding poster. It pays to read what is actually written or to seek clarification if you’re not sure what the poster means.

    I
    am of the opinion that it’s definitely the owner’s responsibility to ensure that his/her dog does not lash out at people while in public. Depending on the ferocity of the attack this sometimes warrants the destruction of the animal. I would definitely report the incident and get a tetanus shot although the photo indicates to me a normal bodily response to broken skin.

    Yes I had the tetanus shot yesterday.

    "Life Is Ours, We Live It Our Way".

  11. #37
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    I agree with pretty much everything you have said, that is why I said you were clouded, because you thought I was saying one thing, when I was actually saying the opposite. All dogs have the capacity to attack, even the ones who are considered kind and non aggressive. I also agree with you about certain types of dogs requiring certain types of owners, pit bulls being a prime example, needing a very strong pack leader etc. Although, pit bulls being purely bred as fighting dogs surely calls into question the nature vs nurture thing. Perhaps with them and with certain guard dogs like rotties, it is a little of both? Not enough strong leadership, and a blood line that was specifically created to fight and kill? Not trying to argue with you at all, just pondering all possibilities. I read somewhere that working dogs (kelpies, cattle and border collies) can show aggression, because often they are brought into a suburban home and family - but what they really need to be doing is working out on the land, and the start to go stir crazy with inactivity.

    Quote Originally Posted by LilCritter View Post

    Some dogs are not naturally aggressive, they have weak owners that don't establish boundaries & educate their dog. Pure breed dogs & mixed bloodlines have no impact as I have owned, trained & studied both.

    Please don't confuse what I'm saying - you are right that a dog can show aggression but it's not a natural reaction unless this behaviour has gone unaddressed or the dog feels threatened.

    Children & dogs left alone is not on. It's because of my involvement that I am passionate (not clouded) about animal management. The more we are aware as parents the more we can teach our children & keep them safe.

    I teach children about body language, how to approach a dog & how their reactions are interpreted. I just want to make it clear because I very much hate reading about these dog attacks & believe we as humans are responsible for animal control & child safety.

    Just so you know, it's been proven that owners of specific breed dogs are not training these dogs properly & their genetic makeup makes them prime physical killers - not by nature. My cocker spaniel is born & bred to go after birds or drive out flocks for hunters.

    She can comfortably be around ducks, chickens - any bird at my hand & I can control her behaviour because I took the time to teach her. Sounds like this owner is just using a cop out by saying the dog doesn't like children & I feel so sad to hear OP was bitten because of this.

    Number one is that the owners are found by the council because they clearly didn't think their dog biting poor OP was more than a random accident.


 

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