+ Reply to Thread
Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst ... 3456 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 57
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    92
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    32
    Reviews
    0
    It sure is hard, there is such a fine line between allowing them to learn their own lessons and stepping in to prevent disaster. I do let my 15yo stay home alone sometimes, not so much at night time tbh but I know she would be fine if I did. I always make sure we are home if her friends are over. I know them all and they are responsible good kids but if anything ever happened and I wasn't there I couldn't live with myself.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to KLM76 For This Useful Post:

    KaraB  (23-11-2013)

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1,581
    Thanks
    748
    Thanked
    733
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I think by 15 you need to be having some tough talks with her. My theory is that kids today aren't overly street smart and that's a problem.

    I run thru scenarios with my kids ie what's your plan if your home alone & house catches on fire, what would you do if you came home from school and front door was smashed in etc etc. I listen to what they think is best plan & then I pick it to pieces and give ideas for alternatives.

    I'm not able to be everywhere at once & need to know I can rely on them in a bad situation to be smart, if that makes sense

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to ourbradybunch For This Useful Post:

    KaraB  (23-11-2013),sockstealingpoltergeist  (23-11-2013)

  5. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    856
    Thanks
    51
    Thanked
    236
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I am totally with you. I have a 14yo so getting close. But if she went to a sleepover and the parent LIED about supervision I would be there in a flash to pick her up. It's easy for parents with toddlers to think 15yo's are grown up, but they are not. I absolutely would trust my daughter to "behave" on her own, but I know that she would feel very uncomfortable in a situation where a parent was supposed to be there but then left for the night - as would I. I would definitely go and get her and she would not go back to that house.

  6. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to beancounter For This Useful Post:

    KaraB  (23-11-2013),LoveLivesHere  (23-11-2013),WiseOldOwl  (23-11-2013)

  7. #44
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    92
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    32
    Reviews
    0
    I agree bradybunch! Our kids aren't streets smart these days, especially amongst their peers. Good idea to give them what if scenarios but I know myself if I'm in a stressful situation I won't always do what my calm self would do.
    I remember being 12 and was babysitting my cousins baby on my own because she was in hospital and my mum had to go to work! I would never give my kids that sort of responsibility. Times have changed for sure

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to KLM76 For This Useful Post:

    KaraB  (23-11-2013),sockstealingpoltergeist  (23-11-2013)

  9. #45
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Haunted House
    Posts
    10,891
    Thanks
    1,538
    Thanked
    1,568
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    I have an adult daughter, her and her friends used to go and stay with another friend who's mother frequently went out and left them home alone. I liked her to keep her friend company. They used to eat some junk food, watch movies. Typical teenage stuff.

    My daughter was really sensible and used to call me to come get her if her friends wanted to go parties and drink (and I even said I was fine if she wanted to go to the parties, so long as I knew where she was and she was contactable and would also call me to come get her if needed).

    I think letting children have some freedom and to make choices is very important.

    Thats JMO.

    I would be annoyed at being lied to, but I'd be using it as talking point with my DD about why it's wrong and what could go wrong when people aren't honest about important things.

  10. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to sockstealingpoltergeist For This Useful Post:

    Gandalf  (24-11-2013),KaraB  (23-11-2013)

  11. #46
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    856
    Thanks
    51
    Thanked
    236
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I disagree that this is a situation where you can say "time she had freedom" and makes correct choices etc. That applies when you send them off to the movies with their friends or to a party. This was organised as a supervised sleepover and the supervisor left for the night. As PP said - the mother could turn up with some undesirable in the middle of the night. I see it as an unsafe situation and I would get my child out of there. Time enough for her to deal with this sort of stuff when she is older but I would not make my child deal with a potentially uncomfortable and possibly dangerous situation at 15.
    Maybe kids aren't "street smart" these days but I'm in no rush to force my kid to be "street smart" when I am happy to look after her for the next few years. Adult life is hard and I want my kid to have a protected and safe childhood as long as I can.

  12. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to beancounter For This Useful Post:

    HowCrazyCool  (23-11-2013),KaraB  (23-11-2013)

  13. #47
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    4,222
    Thanks
    894
    Thanked
    3,218
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by KaraB View Post
    Yeah I know, I thought about letting her stay but I just don't trust this woman at all and I wonder what this girl is like (her daughter) if she's being raised by a woman who is able to lie so casually under these circumstances. It has me questioning everything. I don't know her daughter at all. My daughter is very impressionable and I have had some issues with her being influenced by some not so great teenage girls not so long ago and some unfortunate internet incidences that have me very nervous about what she says versus what she does. The other thing is the only reason she owned up to the mother being out all night was because I told her I was going to call the mother to make sure- so she knew she wasn't going to get away with it. I guess the bottom line for me is that if something bad happens I am responsible because I let her stay knowing she would not be supervised and for all I know they could be going out god knows where and I have no way of knowing either way. The girl who's house she's at does not look 15 at all- she looks 20 and is absolutely stunning- next to my daughter who is also tall and beautiful ugh scary.. teenage girls are scary I tell you
    Going by your OP I would have said it's ok, 3x15yo will be ok, the mother shouldn't have lied but other than that, no issue. But after reading the above... my best friends teen is exactly the same- looks 18, gorgeous, very naive and impressionable, friends set up little white lies about whereabouts, and she has been involved in some 'unfortunate internet incidences' as well, which all happens at friends houses. So with that history, yes I would be very annoyed and concerned, and if I were the parent I would consider picking her up and taking her home.

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to CMF For This Useful Post:

    KaraB  (24-11-2013)

  15. #48
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    2,089
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked
    258
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Annoyed about lie.
    But don't see problem with 3 x 15yo old left alone. My parents let me do many things when younger, I just had to tell them what's going on, my friends parents would let her do anything and I can tell you who is the better one and less problems now!

  16. #49
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    217
    Thanks
    202
    Thanked
    78
    Reviews
    6
    I wouldn't of trusted the 15 year old me! Honestly I think you were right for picking her up, you need to go with your instincts too. I think it's really irresponsible of her to tell you she would be home when she wouldn't, as that would make me very weary of her. Maybe have the sleepovers at your house for a little while?
    Good luck, and I think you're being a good Mum

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to MissSparkles For This Useful Post:

    KaraB  (24-11-2013)

  18. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    2,450
    Thanks
    732
    Thanked
    555
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Thinking back to when I was 15 yep. I'd be picking her up. Depends on your daughter also. At 15 I would have been 1. Meeting up with my 18 year old boyfriend and all that goes with that. 2. Smoking pot and 3. Getting drunk .
    If you trust her then leave her. If she's making poor choices at the moment pick her up.
    EDIT I'd be very ****ed at the mother.

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using The Bub Hub mobile app

  19. The Following User Says Thank You to CleverClogs For This Useful Post:

    KaraB  (24-11-2013)


 

Similar Threads

  1. Annoyed...silly reason but still annoyed
    By Louise41 in forum General Chat
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 25-09-2013, 14:33
  2. Are you the parent of a 0-24 month old? The Parent and Infant Survey
    By HealthybabyUQ in forum Can you help with these campaigns?
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-08-2013, 14:32
  3. How to parent/step-parent part time...?
    By poppy83 in forum Step-parents / Blended families
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 24-03-2013, 08:49

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
BAE The Label
Versatile, premium maternity wear that you will love throughout pregnancy and long after. Cleverly designed for for all stages of motherhood so that you can 'Just be you (+1)'.
sales & new stuffsee all
Bub Hub Sales Listing
HAVING A SALE? Let parents know about it with a Bub Hub Sales listing. Listings are featured on our well trafficked Sales Page + selected randomly to appear on EVERY page
featured supporter
Pea Pods Reusable Nappies
Pea Pods are the smart choice when it comes to choosing what's best for you, your baby and the environment. Affordable and simple to use, Pea Pods keep your baby dry & happy. Visit our website to find your nearest stockist or order online.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!