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  1. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by beebs View Post
    If people are fatigued, and they don't even know it. Then how are they supposed to know if they are or aren't.
    because people arent idiots. sleeping 3 hours night after night is going to have you sleep deprived.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrsBid View Post
    because people arent idiots. sleeping 3 hours night after night is going to have you sleep deprived.
    You're contradicting yourself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FearlessLeader View Post
    No, this thread is being TAKEN out of context. If it genuinely can't be avoided, it can't be avoided. If you have to drive while fatigued you take the necessary precautions and do what you can to get there safely.
    I have also said that it's not about being so tired you will fall asleep (although you shouldn't do that either!) I'm talking about much lower reaction times and the danger of micro sleeps.
    If you have to drive to work or because you need medicine or you really do need groceries that's one thing. But you should at least stop and think 'I'm really tired. I need to take it easy, keep the windows down, not listen to the radio, whatever' and if it's NOT an essential trip you need to rethink going at all. Catch a bus. Call your play date and say 'look I didn't get much sleep and I'd rather not drive, any chance you could come here?' Call your husband and ask him to bring home bread and milk. It's not ok to just get in a car because you want to when you are endangering others on the road. Sorry it's just not. You need to think about and manage it the way you would drinking and driving. of COURSE you cant always control how much sleep you get, or whether you have to drive somewhere. but far too many people dont seem to give it a second thought, or think it is somehow a bit of a laugh or shrug their shoulders. I don't drive, but DP and I have cancelled long car journeys if he hasn't had enough sleep. If he hasn't had enough sleep he will walk instead of ride to work. He caught a taxi home from the hospital and we copped a big parking fee when he went home at 5am after DS was born. What I am saying is that you can't just jump into your car whenever you like, it is your responsibility to make sure everyone on the road is safe. If you haven't had enough sleep, driving should be a last resort. I won't back down from that position. It is dangerous to drive fatigued.
    actually studies show listening to the radio helps keep you awake.

    However as a mother of a child who was always sick, and who didn't sleep much for a few years, I would never have done anything. I think serious harm may have come our way in the form of depression or mental illness due to isolation. I already felt depressed and isolated enough.

    If I was exhausted I used to ask for help, but I couldn't do that everyday. I didn't have anyone who would step up and help me every day or even a few times a week.

    I operated on tired mode a lot.

    I can empathise and understand how some parents forget things even when they aren't that tired. I do it all the time. I'm not perfect. I do what I can and what I feel is necessary.

    I also do what I feel is reasonable and necessary to protect my family and children.
    I don't think being tired means you should lock your self away, nor is it even possible for most people.

    And for all those perfect people who have never done anything while tired, never made a mistake, misjudged a situation or forgotten something, then kudos to you.

    To all those other evil parents, you are probably doing your best. And if people don't think it's good enough. Oh well.

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    I'm perpetually fatigued but my family and I still have needs. I do my very best to minimise risk, but circumstances mean that on occasion, I drive when I am fatigued. Not good enough for some? Well, meh. I don't think driving tired is a giggle and I don't do it unless I have to. But guess what? Sometimes I have to.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    You're contradicting yourself.
    I dont think I am. Most people wouldnt have a clue what fatigue feels like. but you know that 3 hours sleep isnt enough for the average human adult. you may feel fine and not even realise theres something wrong. People genuinely think because they feel fine they are fine. It's been said between both threads. people understand that they dont sleep enough but they feel fine so they drive.

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    I suffer terribly from insomnia. A good night for me is 4-5hr stretch of sleep a bad night 2-3 lots of 1-2hr stretches of sleep.

    On the few occasions I've had 6+ hrs I feel like a completely different person. In general I limit my driving as I think it's unsafe, I also never drive at night:/

  10. #77
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    FearlessLeader is offline Winner 2013 - Most Memorable Thread
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskittyfantastico View Post
    I'm perpetually fatigued but my family and I still have needs. I do my very best to minimise risk, but circumstances mean that on occasion, I drive when I am fatigued. Not good enough for some? Well, meh. I don't think driving tired is a giggle and I don't do it unless I have to. But guess what? Sometimes I have to.
    That's fine. That's great. That's exactly what I was saying, so we are in complete agreement. That is absolutely good enough for me.

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    I dont agree with your estimation of what would cause driver fatigue.

    Like another previous post said ... some rarely get a 5 hour block of sleep. I wen years of seldom getting to sleep before 2:30 am and would be waking again at 6:30. I was caring for a baby sister with epilepsy who could have an average of a seizure an hour.

    Sometimes I would be fatigued, if I was driving I would simply pull over, recline the seat and have a snooze, that did not happen to often.

    It was not often that I would feel fatigued while driving. Yes I agree driver fatigue can be compared to drink driving


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    Quote Originally Posted by FearlessLeader View Post
    That's fine. That's great. That's exactly what I was saying, so we are in complete agreement. That is absolutely good enough for me.
    Thanks, I thought we were, there was just another post that said (I'm paraphrasing), it didn't matter what the excuse was, driving tired/fatigued was unacceptable and I just think that's an unfair statement in light of some peoples circumstances.

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    I used to very irresponsibly drive fatigued, before kids, after a very late night (not drinking), I'd get to work and couldn't even remember the drive there...eeek.

    Now that Im a responsible adult I try not to drive fatigued- I certainly don't do long drives if I'm tired, but I haven't had a solid five hr block sleep for a couple of years, and still have to drive most days. I don't mean to get milk etc, I'll walk to the closest shop for that, but I do have to get the kids to school, which isn't in walking distance. It is really unavoidable for a lot of people.

    I have pulled over on the side of the Monash a few times for a micro sleep, which is a bit embarrassing really, its only a 40 min drive to the airport, but if I'm tired I have to pull over.


 

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