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  1. #21
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    I never forgot it All that for a 5lb baby too

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by futuremamma View Post
    I can't believe they gave you such a large episiotomy! How awful for you.
    Yep, I never forgot it And all of that for my 'huge!' 5lb 15 oz baby

  3. #23
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    I did heaps of research on this before my last birth. I had a 3rd degree tear with my ds, midwives at booking in visit in my second pregnancy mentioned said I had the option of vb or cs. I hadn't even considered a cs till then and I immediately asked a close friend who was also a midwife. She said "are you asking me as a midwife or as a woman?" and I thought this needs some serious thought. I'm happy to share my research with you (i'm typing on my phone and it's so slow) if you want to pm me or have any questions. Out of all the studies I read though, there were 2 things that made me elect for a cs the second time around. First was that all 4th degree tears and symptomatic 3rd degree tears should be offered cs (i had trouble with wind and urgency). Second was that damage from subsequent pregnancies may occur to the anal sphincter without a perineal tear occurring - occult injury. So the damage is done internally without a visible outer tear even occurring. So your risk of prolapse and incontinence later in life (or current) can be much higher if you have another vb even if you don't "tear". They may also do endoanal u/s months after delivery to check function and healing. Your personal risk with future vbs may depend on other factors including results of this test. Sorry if this doesn't make total sense, I hate typing on my phone, it's so slow and I have so much info on this I don't know where to start. Happy to share but also no regrets with my elec cs choice for #2.

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  4. #24
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    Oh and the other thing was that tears are often hard to predict - "risk" factors include things like size and presentation of baby (often not really known till you are in Labour) and being a first baby, delivering on your back, epidural etc. My babies were average size but my first was posterior and after a long Labour I ended up on my back with an epidural and vacuum assistance. I had done calm birthing and this was not my plan! In the end, I thought if many of the risk factors may not be evident until Labour, I'd rather not take the chance. The risk of having a second bad tear does not increase because you have had one already, but it's the difficulty in predicting and preventing tears that scared me. Add to that the possibility of occult injury to an already damaged area, I didn't want ongoing damage if it was possible to avoid it. Often weakness won't show until menopause when hormonal changes affect muscle tone. I already had weakness, and that was just a 3rd degree tear (3a).some people have worse with 3b, 3c or 4th degree. It is probably highly personal how individuals recover but make sure you see the hospital physios.

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  5. #25
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    Thanks for all the great info veggiemama. I've been referred to the hospital perineal clinic where I will see someone 6-12 months down the track. They'll do an ultrasound at that stage. I've seen the hospital physios but will start private sessions soon. I know what you mean about the unpredictability during labour. My last labour was a breeze - I'd worked hard to do everything I could to have a successful vbac, but who could have predicted the ending. It was going so perfectly! I also ended up with a large vaginal wall tear - I'm guessing that will compound things further. Maybe I can have a positive elective c experience - and demand a more natural delivery - and no separation from baby etc.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by veggiemama View Post
    Oh and the other thing was that tears are often hard to predict - "risk" factors include things like size and presentation of baby (often not really known till you are in Labour) and being a first baby, delivering on your back, epidural etc. My babies were average size but my first was posterior and after a long Labour I ended up on my back with an epidural and vacuum assistance. I had done calm birthing and this was not my plan! In the end, I thought if many of the risk factors may not be evident until Labour, I'd rather not take the chance. The risk of having a second bad tear does not increase because you have had one already, but it's the difficulty in predicting and preventing tears that scared me. Add to that the possibility of occult injury to an already damaged area, I didn't want ongoing damage if it was possible to avoid it. Often weakness won't show until menopause when hormonal changes affect muscle tone. I already had weakness, and that was just a 3rd degree tear (3a).some people have worse with 3b, 3c or 4th degree. It is probably highly personal how individuals recover but make sure you see the hospital physios.

    Sent from my HTC One X
    Veggiemama - how was your pelvic floor function after your c-section? do you mind if I pm you for info you found on this...any research etc?

  7. #27
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    Feel free to pm

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