+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    4,222
    Thanks
    894
    Thanked
    3,218
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts

    Default Did anyone go to a selective (academic) high school?

    As title suggests?

    I'm wondering about if it impacted you going from being 'the smart kid' at primary school, into a school where you may not have been top of the class anymore because others were smarter?

    TIA.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Griffith NSW
    Posts
    2,237
    Thanks
    802
    Thanked
    918
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I did, and it was difficult for a lot of us in the first term of year 7, but it pushed most of us to work harder.
    By year 8, everyone had a 'niche' subject that they were good at and that helped. I was always one of the worst at maths, but being better than most at English and history helped take the sting off lol

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to SeymourTheBear For This Useful Post:

    CMF  (15-10-2013)

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    119
    Thanks
    197
    Thanked
    66
    Reviews
    2
    This is a really good question. I'm looking at this for my DS and never considered this as a potential problem.

    Sent from my U8510 using The Bub Hub mobile app

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to BubinDec For This Useful Post:

    CMF  (15-10-2013)

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    385
    Thanks
    240
    Thanked
    264
    Reviews
    0
    I went to a selective school and I did sometimes feel that. There were times when I wondered if I was good enough to be there, but not to the point that it really stressed me out - more of a passing thought. Early on, everyone is in the same boat, feeling a bit insecure like that.

    Overall, I think I was less motivated with my schoolwork at a selective school, but only because my focus shifted to my relationships with the people around me. Suddenly, I had peers who understood me and could relate at the same level and it was wonderful not to be alone anymore. I still did well at school although maybe not as well as I would have done at a normal school - who knows? But 20 years later, I'm still friends with lots of amazing people from school and I look back at that as the best time of my life.

    I would also say that perhaps not being the best anymore is a good chance to shift your focus from being better that everyone else to being the best that YOU can be. It means that your identity is not so tied up with your intelligence and that's not such a bad thing.

    Good luck making the choice with your kid. Whether you make the wrong or right decision, you obviously really care or you wouldn't have posted the question. All the best with your decision.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Cdro For This Useful Post:

    CMF  (15-10-2013)

  8. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    3,131
    Thanks
    664
    Thanked
    922
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I went to a selective school and no it wasn't an issue. My parents were quite reassuring that not being top of the class was completely fine. I agree with other posters that we all still managed to find our areas and subjects to excel in. For me it was a very positive experience. There all appeared to be less disruptive behaviour in general which made for a more conducive learning environment. That was my experience anyway

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to bel2466 For This Useful Post:

    CMF  (15-10-2013)

  10. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Fraser Coast
    Posts
    482
    Thanks
    529
    Thanked
    348
    Reviews
    0
    I did not go to a selective school but was put in a selective class for English and later Maths.

    The English class made me feel normal. I could relate to my peers. I wasn't the geek who read all the time.

    With Maths it was a huge confidence booster because I had always thought Maths and I just couldn't get along. In year 8, my maths teacher took my appalling grade and made me believe I could achieve more. With her encouragement, I worked at it and made the "honours" class. It made me feel I could accomplish anything: a fond memory that I often hark back to when things are tough.

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to happy wanderer For This Useful Post:

    CMF  (15-10-2013),Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (16-10-2013)

  12. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    297
    Thanks
    56
    Thanked
    154
    Reviews
    0
    I was selected into an academic extension class in high school. This was a normal public high school with one extension class in each year. We did extension in maths, science, English and social studies, but were with main****** students in all other classes.

    I went from being the smartest kid in the class who didn't have to do any work, to the middle of the class and having to actually put some effort in. It was a major adjustment for me. In the first half of the first year I did have some moments when I wanted to give it up. In the end I used it as a motivation to do better and spent my time trying to beat the smartest girl in the class.

    However, it was absolutely awesome for me socially. I finally had friends who were just like me. 25 years later and we are still friends.

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to Leafy For This Useful Post:

    CMF  (15-10-2013)

  14. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    4,277
    Thanks
    8,191
    Thanked
    3,918
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Both DH and I went to an selective academic high school. It can be tough going from being the smartest to just average, and some had difficulties with this and left within the first year to go to their local high. I also struggled initially as I was the only one from my primary school so I didn't have any friends (made them quickly enough though)

    Personally, it was the best thing for both of us as our local high schools were awful with bad reps. There is less riffraff and no bullying for being smart.
    Your kid would make lifelong friends and be able to have intelligent conversations. I'm pretty sure I would of ended up at 16 pregnant and doing naughty things if I went local lol.

    But if your kid is willing to go and you are lucky enough to have a bright kid it can set them up for a great future!

    Edit: and I met my husband there! Plus 3 other couples in our grade got married too.....
    Last edited by Little Miss Sunshine; 14-10-2013 at 17:33.

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to Little Miss Sunshine For This Useful Post:

    CMF  (15-10-2013)

  16. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    4,277
    Thanks
    8,191
    Thanked
    3,918
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    And it's important for the parents to be supportive and not place any pressure (you sound like you've done a fantastic job) because sometimes it can make you feel like a failure unnecessarily. All the teachers assumed and prepared you for university - other options weren't even considered or discussed such as a trade, tafe, any job. So when I quit uni (i was burnt out- over study and exams couldn't cope with it anymore)i was at a complete loss. I am an aged care nurse now (I could of done this quitting year 10 and being dumb as fk) so sometimes I still feel like a failure even though I love my work.
    Last edited by Little Miss Sunshine; 14-10-2013 at 18:24.

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to Little Miss Sunshine For This Useful Post:

    CMF  (15-10-2013)

  18. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    4,222
    Thanks
    894
    Thanked
    3,218
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Thanks for the replies.

    The main reason I would love him to get in is for him to have like-minded peers. He really doesn't have that now as he is just not your stereotypical boy. So not only do I imagine that he could find good friends, but I also would hope that his schooling would be improved because of these peers, ie they can sit and chat about weird geeky stuff and/or school work if they wanted to.
    So it's reasurring that some of you say you did find like-minded peers.

    He's not a confident kid... or maybe he's quietly confident, I dunno... he's quite a mystery sometimes... but it's not like he is one of those 'braggy' top of the class kids. He just quietly does what he needs to and that's that. Just blends into the background. So I don't need to worry about the 'mindset' of being better than everyone or being great at everything, because that's not the case here. I'm just not sure how he would be affected by this, hence me asking the question.

    Anyway, I don't even know if he will get in. He will sit the test, and then we'll go from there I guess!


 

Similar Threads

  1. Private Primary School then Public High School
    By astrogal in forum Preschools and Schools
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 26-09-2013, 09:24
  2. Same-sex relationships at high school?
    By 1234Guest in forum News & Current Affairs
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 14-09-2013, 12:42
  3. High school reunion
    By dancingchipmunk in forum General Chat
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 30-08-2013, 22:00

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Pyjamas.com.au
With so many gorgeous brands and styles for every season, our pyjamas, nighties, robes, sleepsuits and sleeping bags are lovely for lights out and perfect for lazy days. Get 10% off first order using code bubhub. Be quick offer ends 31/12/16.
sales & new stuffsee all
Pea Pods
Buy 2 Award Winning Pea Pods Reusable One Size Nappies for only $38 (in your choice of colours) and receive a FREE roll of Bamboo Liners. Don't miss out, we don't usually have discounts on the nappies, so grab this special offer!
Special Offer! Save $12
featured supporter
Innovations Sports Physiotherapy
Women’s Health Physios who are able to assess and treat a wide range of Pregnancy and Post Natal Issues. We offer Post Natal Pilates Classes taken by our Physios. These classes help you rebuild strength through your Core and Pelvic Floor.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!