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  1. #21
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    I think that of all the factors that impact on future employment/success the type of school is the least important. More influential factors are the child's ability, their motivation, parent support and parent belief in the importance of education.

    I went to a public school with a poor reputation but it was always assumed by my parents that I would go to uni. My friends at school were the more academically inclined students. From my friendship group we have; a dietician, pharmacist, psychologist, high school teacher, accountant and an anaesthetist.

    That said my DD will be going to a private school but only because DH is Catholic and wants our children to go to a Catholic school.

    Personally, if I were in your position I would be inclined to use the money for tertiary education rather than a private secondary school. And also making sure you reinforce the importance of education, listening to teachers, completing schoolwork and doing the best they can.

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    I went to a public high school - I lived in regional Queensland and there were no private high school options unless you wanted to go to boarding school, which a handful did, but pretty much everybody went to this public high school so there were a lot of very smart kids who went on to be successful engineers, vets, lawyers etc.

    We now live in Brisbane, and will be sending our children to private high schools. I have no doubt that my children will excel academically in a public or a private school, but in our area private schools offer a safer environment and more subject choices and extra curricular activities.

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  5. #23
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    I went to a public school in a area with low socioeconomic reputation. Did extremely well enough in high school I could choose any course I wanted to at uni . I ended up choosing a course mainly bc I got the marks for it and ended up dropping out. Went on to do a completely different degree and have a pretty good job now. I did have tutoring through high school.

    Dh went to a catholic school. Academic wise he didn't do as well as me but he has more drive and ambition and career wise is doing much better than me.

    My kids are still young but if I can afford it I would like to send them to private school bc I think they cater for those with other interests outside the normal curriculum and the most important thing I want to teach them is to follow their dreams and do what interests them.
    Good grades means its easier to get into certain courses but there isn't only one way to get there.

  6. #24
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    I went to both a private and public school. Private school for years 8 and 9 then public school for 10,11 & 12.

    I had a very bad experience at the private school, I really didn't like it at all so admittedly my opinion is tainted.

    After year 12 I was an exchange student and lived in another country for a year with a family and went to school. This was an amazing experience and one that I would not have done had I stayed at the private school, simply because I would not have made it to year 12 there. I then went to University afterwards earning a bachelor's degree. I never really knew what I wanted to do as a career but I ended up in a reasonably successful career in IT project management.

    I think the key is that the school has to fit the child. It might have a great reputation but if the school is not a good fit for the child then it's not going to optimise their education. I have started my DS at the local public school but I have no hesitation in challenging the school or even changing if I do not thing things are being managed appropriately.

    Our thinking is that the kids will attend public schools and if needed we will spend money on tutors and/or any thing else that may assist their education. We also intend on playing an active role in their education (eg reviewing homework etc) and money we don't spend on private education can be spent on other educational experiences like holidays, visits to exhibitions etc.

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  8. #25
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    FearlessLeader is offline Winner 2013 - Most Memorable Thread
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    I went to one of the best public schools in the state and at my 10 year reunion almost all of us work for the government! Teachers and academics, nurses and doctors, scientists, librarians etc. a few in creative fields, a few working in law and some for NGOs. My partner went to a middle rung private school and most of his classmates went on to private professional fields. Accountants, communications, law, finance etc. the cultures of the schools were really different so I think that's a huge factor. I would be more inclined to send my kids to a school that fit their interests best rather than anything else. My brother is 30 and has only realized he wants to be an accountant. Never crossed his mind at our leftie hippy school (and with him being one of the biggest leftie hippies there, lol). We have a choice to send our kids to a very academic school, or a very artsy one, or one with a fabulous sports program. 2 don't have great reps but if the kids aren't academic there's no point sending them to the 'good' school.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleetwood View Post
    I was private school educated and while I don't necessarily think children will do better at private as opposed to public academically, I have always noticed how my school friends write and speak well, have good grammar, and definitely stand out to me as the better educated in that respect. We had quite a small final year though and I believe the school is much bigger now which would deter me sending DS there tbh. Public high schools have much bigger class sizes and the kids generally come from all walks of life and are more street wise - we were pretty sheltered in that respect.

    But educationally/future career-wise, I don't think it makes much difference. It's a very individual/personality type hung to chose a career and no school will ultimately influence how studious a student wants to be.
    My experience is the opposite- people I know who were privately educated have appalling spelling and grammar. One guy I know bangs on quite a bit about his private schooling and the wonderful education he received and the values it instilled in him- he is one of the most arrogant, ignorant and racist people I know and his spelling and grammar are atrocious- I firmly believe his ultra-pricey private school failed to notice his dyslexia!

    I went to selective public high school and I can't say I fit the mould there at all. I rebelled against the structure and expectation and although I'm reasonably intelligent my results didn't show it! I work now in a relatively well paid government job.

    Out of my school friends, there are several with doctorates, lecturing at Uni, doctors, lawyers, writers, nurses, accountants, financial controllers, professional musicians, teachers, designers, project managers in various industries, police etc.

    Out of people I know who were privately educated there is the guy I mentioned above who has a failed business under his belt and now works in an unskilled office job, another woman I know who is an unskilled office worker (not knocking her for this at all- I've done this sort of work too), a few people who work where I do, one manages a pub, another is a builder for his dad's company, one works in childcare. I have no doubt that there are some privately educated people with wonderful careers, my point though is that I don't think the school matters so much as the person- if you are a determined person, you will succeed at what you want to do, and school can help shape that but it's not the only factor iykwim.

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    I went to private school, have a masters degree and a good job with what would be deemed high salary.

    However I think I would have achieved the same if I went to public school. My first two years of high school were public, I was always pretty diligent and liked to do well so studied hard. That is an inherent quality I think so public/private wouldn't have changed that.

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  13. #28
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    This might interest you BT&M

    http://mobile.news.com.au/lifestyle/...-1226726249081

    I believe in different schools for different kids. That said I recently saw Pasi Sahlberg present a keynote on Finlands system (they have excellent Pisa result, best overallI think) and was really taken with their equity over choice values. There is no option to buy a better education.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Atropos View Post
    My experience is the opposite- people I know who were privately educated have appalling spelling and grammar. One guy I know bangs on quite a bit about his private schooling and the wonderful education he received and the values it instilled in him- he is one of the most arrogant, ignorant and racist people I know and his spelling and grammar are atrocious- I firmly believe his ultra-pricey private school failed to notice his dyslexia!

    I went to selective public high school and I can't say I fit the mould there at all. I rebelled against the structure and expectation and although I'm reasonably intelligent my results didn't show it! I work now in a relatively well paid government job.

    Out of my school friends, there are several with doctorates, lecturing at Uni, doctors, lawyers, writers, nurses, accountants, financial controllers, professional musicians, teachers, designers, project managers in various industries, police etc.

    Out of people I know who were privately educated there is the guy I mentioned above who has a failed business under his belt and now works in an unskilled office job, another woman I know who is an unskilled office worker (not knocking her for this at all- I've done this sort of work too), a few people who work where I do, one manages a pub, another is a builder for his dad's company, one works in childcare. I have no doubt that there are some privately educated people with wonderful careers, my point though is that I don't think the school matters so much as the person- if you are a determined person, you will succeed at what you want to do, and school can help shape that but it's not the only factor iykwim.

    But you're agreeing with me(?) or did you only mean the spelling and grammar part? I'm surprised but I guess it depends on the school, I went to a grammar school and there was a strong focus on grammar coincidentally.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleetwood View Post
    But you're agreeing with me(?) or did you only mean the spelling and grammar part? I'm surprised but I guess it depends on the school, I went to a grammar school and there was a strong focus on grammar coincidentally.
    You said you went private and all your school friends have good spelling and grammar, I said my experience is opposite, the majority of people I know who went private have terrible spelling and grammar, the guy I spoke about is a standout in that group!


 

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