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  1. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    there are parents in our area who actually hire tutors to coach kids in 4/5/6th class to pass the selective schools exams for high school- these schools are highly competitive - which is great if your child is maybe naturally gifted but for the average child I think its way to much pressure , especially primary school
    I think that is just so sad. These tutors are teaching these kids nothing more than to pass the test, and if they get to a selective school, they'll be out of their depth and/or fall through the cracks.

  2. #192
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jakois View Post
    Can you explain how this works? I always assumed that your marks were based on individual performance?
    I wish.

    The Queensland system works a bit differently to the rest of the country.


    Everyone who wants to be OP- eligible sits a general knowledge test called the QCS test (completely unrelated to any subjects that you're actually studying).


    Your ranking for each subject (so not your actual marks, but where you sit in the ranking compared to other students in your class. So if you got an A and everyone else got a C, your A is worth a lot more than if everyone got an A) is then added to the average QCS score for students in your school studying that subject.


    That all gets added up, and all the students in Queensland get ranked against each other, and they allocate the OP scores via a percentage bell curve according to that rank list.


    Where the private/public school issue comes in, is that private schools can refuse to allow certain students to sit the QCS test which would effectively increase their average QCS test score which then boosts their students rankings and then their OP's whereas public schools can't.

  3. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by wannawannabe View Post
    I wish.

    The Queensland system works a bit differently to the rest of the country.


    Everyone who wants to be OP- eligible sits a general knowledge test called the QCS test (completely unrelated to any subjects that you're actually studying).


    Your ranking for each subject (so not your actual marks, but where you sit in the ranking compared to other students in your class. So if you got an A and everyone else got a C, your A is worth a lot more than if everyone got an A) is then added to the average QCS score for students in your school studying that subject.


    That all gets added up, and all the students in Queensland get ranked against each other, and they allocate the OP scores via a percentage bell curve according to that rank list.


    Where the private/public school issue comes in, is that private schools can refuse to allow certain students to sit the QCS test which would effectively increase their average QCS test score which then boosts their students rankings and then their OP's whereas public schools can't.
    So by that explanation, how would the "deadbeats" be dragging others down if the A you got is worth more?

  4. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by wannawannabe View Post
    I wish.

    The Queensland system works a bit differently to the rest of the country.


    Everyone who wants to be OP- eligible sits a general knowledge test called the QCS test (completely unrelated to any subjects that you're actually studying).


    Your ranking for each subject (so not your actual marks, but where you sit in the ranking compared to other students in your class. So if you got an A and everyone else got a C, your A is worth a lot more than if everyone got an A) is then added to the average QCS score for students in your school studying that subject.


    That all gets added up, and all the students in Queensland get ranked against each other, and they allocate the OP scores via a percentage bell curve according to that rank list.


    Where the private/public school issue comes in, is that private schools can refuse to allow certain students to sit the QCS test which would effectively increase their average QCS test score which then boosts their students rankings and then their OP's whereas public schools can't.
    If you went to a public school and you weren't terribly academic, wouldn't you be more likely to take non-op eligible subjects so you wouldn't sit the QCS and wouldn't have any impact on the scores of those that do?

    I know when I went to school, that is how it typically went. Heaps of students weren't op eligible and didn't sit the QCS.

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using The Bub Hub mobile app

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    Quote Originally Posted by beebs View Post
    I understand, I was questioning whether it was the actual school or the public system. I think it would be the school, no? And if so, you can't blame the entire education system for one school.
    It was an excellent high school. Lots of opportunities for sporting, academic and cultural pursuits and always very supportive of the high achieving students.


    But there was 330 year 12's in my year and 3 OP 1's. There was 90 students at the private school and 13 OP 1's.


    Maths was a compulsory subject but there was less than 40 us enrolled in the maths subject required for university entrance (Maths B), which gives you an idea of the limited number of students that were actually commuted to studying and achieving well.


    I remember hearing other students saying that they were purposely going to perform poorly on the QCS test to drag down the rest of a school. A private school could simply refuse to let those students sit the QCS test which would dramatically decrease the risk of having a low average for the school.

  6. #196
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    Again it also comes back to the fact that most private school students would have the expectation of going to uni as well.

    And same thing happens with naplan. Students encouraged to stay home if they aren't up to scratch.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    So by that explanation, how would the "deadbeats" be dragging others down if the A you got is worth more?
    By having a crappy average QCS score.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wannawannabe View Post
    By having a crappy average QCS score.
    Except most of the "deadbeats" probably wouldn't sit the QCS. If you aren't OP eligible, you don't have to sit it. To most people the 2 or 3 (?) days off school is more appealing.

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    I still don't understand.

    Wouldn't that mean that it depends on how everyone does in the state? If you are all ranked against each other? QLD is very confusing!

    Are you a Doctor or now? Or in the medical field? Even if you didn't get the score needed, there are other ways to get into medicine.

    I have also never heard of students purposely doing poorly to drag the school average down, why would they do that? What is the point?
    How could it be considered an excellent High school if people perform so badly in the HSC on purpose?

    Quote Originally Posted by wannawannabe View Post
    It was an excellent high school. Lots of opportunities for sporting, academic and cultural pursuits and always very supportive of the high achieving students.


    But there was 330 year 12's in my year and 3 OP 1's. There was 90 students at the private school and 13 OP 1's.


    Maths was a compulsory subject but there was less than 40 us enrolled in the maths subject required for university entrance (Maths B), which gives you an idea of the limited number of students that were actually commuted to studying and achieving well.


    I remember hearing other students saying that they were purposely going to perform poorly on the QCS test to drag down the rest of a school. A private school could simply refuse to let those students sit the QCS test which would dramatically decrease the risk of having a low average for the school.
    Last edited by beebs; 14-10-2013 at 20:21.

  10. #200
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    All this is just another reason to have a national curriculum and uniform schooling across Australia.

    There's no qsc? in nsw.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to BigRedV For This Useful Post:

    beebs  (14-10-2013)


 

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