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  1. #171
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    Oh gosh, I'd forgotten about that, Wanna! Happened to me at high school too.
    I hated it. Worked my *** off only to be hindered by deadbeats.

    We also had a quota system too for certain students where they immediately gained marks on account of their circumstances and were exempt from some aspects of the school year. Totally unfair and utterly bewildering. Could never understand it.

    Quote Originally Posted by wannawannabe View Post
    If I'd gone to the private school in our town then I would have gotten a high enough OP to get into medicine as they only let certain students be OP-eligible.


    Instead I went to the public school and had my marks dragged down by the lower performing students who didn't care.

  2. #172
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    I don't understand, I know two doctors and they both went to public school and got into medicine?

    Quote Originally Posted by wannawannabe View Post
    If I'd gone to the private school in our town then I would have gotten a high enough OP to get into medicine as they only let certain students be OP-eligible.


    Instead I went to the public school and had my marks dragged down by the lower performing students who didn't care.

  3. #173
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    Beebs, she wasn't saying that no one can get into medicine via public school. She was outlining her experience as per the policy existing at her school at the time of her attendance.

    Just because someone attends high school does not make them OP eligible. For the sake of accuracy, I have cut and pasted the following from the Qld Dept of Education's publication on the issue:

    To gain an OP, a student must study a certain number of Authority subjects and satisfy other requirements. The basic eligibility requirement is 20 semester units in Authority subjects, with at least three subjects taken for four semesters.

    Each completed semester of a subject gives a student one unit of credit; studying a subject for four semesters gives four units; therefore, taking five subjects for four semesters gives 20 units.

    Students are also required to complete Year 12 and sit the Queensland Core Skills (QCS) Test. In special cases, such as illness, these requirements may be waived.
    The restriction to Authority subjects is based on their acceptance as appropriate preparation for university studies, especially in terms of their emphasis on academic content and skills. Students’ achievements in these subjects are moderated, ensuring standards across the State are similar. Many students opt to be ineligible for an OP by choosing non-Authority subjects.


    Not all schools offer places for these subjects nor do they all have inclusive policies that allow everyone to sit them. In my school, for example, if you didn't get a certain grade (which was set against the rest of the class) for one subject then you were deemed a non public test student and you didn't do your matriculation (PES) and were forced to do school assessed subjects (SAS).

    Again, probably another good reason to investigate the education parents want to provide for their children.
    Last edited by happy wanderer; 14-10-2013 at 15:38. Reason: additional paragraph for the purpose of clarification

  4. #174
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    yeah I found the deadbeats got way too much attention. they were stoned most of the time too.

  5. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by wannawannabe View Post
    If I'd gone to the private school in our town then I would have gotten a high enough OP to get into medicine as they only let certain students be OP-eligible.


    Instead I went to the public school and had my marks dragged down by the lower performing students who didn't care.
    Can you explain how this works? I always assumed that your marks were based on individual performance?

  6. #176
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    I understand, I was questioning whether it was the actual school or the public system. I think it would be the school, no? And if so, you can't blame the entire education system for one school. There are bad schools in all sections, St Stannies anyone? Which, even given their shocking history of abuse of boys by staff is one of the schools I am considering for my boys.

    Quote Originally Posted by happy wanderer View Post
    Beebs, she wasn't saying that no one can get into medicine via public school. She was outlining her experience as per the policy existing at her school at the time of her attendance.

  7. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by wannawannabe View Post
    Instead I went to the public school and had my marks dragged down by the lower performing students who didn't care.
    Generally curious about this one too. I know different states have different systems, and it has changed over the years... but it is/has been quite common in SA for students from particularly disadvantaged schools to have points automatically added to their TER (tertiary entrance rank) due to the school they attended.

  8. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renn View Post
    Generally curious about this one too. I know different states have different systems, and it has changed over the years... but it is/has been quite common in SA for students from particularly disadvantaged schools to have points automatically added to their TER (tertiary entrance rank) due to the school they attended.
    Yeah, this. I am genuinely curious about what she means about having her marks dragged down.

    Although I do know that in regional NSW you used to get an added 5 marks to your score because you don't have access to the same libraries etc. But I am not sure if they still do it now.

  9. #179
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    Renn, it can go either way depending on the criteria set at the time. I was educated in SA and although the school was considered to be a priority project school, due to the area that my school was situated in, which at the time was considered "non low socio-economic" we were downgraded accordingly. In addition, your overall mark was set against the rest of the class - it's not based on individual performance as a lot of people seem to believe. This, I believe, continues to occur to this day.

    Quote Originally Posted by Renn View Post
    Generally curious about this one too. I know different states have different systems, and it has changed over the years... but it is/has been quite common in SA for students from particularly disadvantaged schools to have points automatically added to their TER (tertiary entrance rank) due to the school they attended.

  10. #180
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    It's both the school and public system.
    This is why, for a lot of people, the private system is so attractive.

    For me though, it's not a matter of blaming but being informed enough to take the appropriate action and for me that means ensuring it doesn't happen to my child.

    Quote Originally Posted by beebs View Post
    I understand, I was questioning whether it was the actual school or the public system. I think it would be the school, no? And if so, you can't blame the entire education system for one school. There are bad schools in all sections, St Stannies anyone? Which, even given their shocking history of abuse of boys by staff is one of the schools I am considering for my boys.


 

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