+ Reply to Thread
Page 15 of 25 FirstFirst ... 51314151617 ... LastLast
Results 141 to 150 of 248
  1. #141
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    At the beach
    Posts
    10,495
    Thanks
    1,430
    Thanked
    9,003
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/10/14100 Posts in a week
    @beebs I agree with you but I was raised with the view that if you have a degree or a qualification of some sort you'll always have something to fall back on while you do other things (like travel, or be a SAHM for a while, or whatever). Obviously it depends on what qualification you get as some are less useful tha others, but I've always found it easy to get work as a lawyer even after considerable breaks from the profession. My siblings had nursing to fall back on and my deceased brother was a journalist. I guess for me I'd worry how my kids were going to pay the bills etc if they had nothing to go back to. DD1 is showing a strong leaning to artistic fields not academic which is a head spin for DH and I but we'll support her no matter what.

  2. #142
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    10,012
    Thanks
    14,124
    Thanked
    7,612
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    Same, my cousin and his wife sent their 3 kids to a really nice private school and bought a house they couldn't afford in an area they coulnd't afford, so they both had to work two jobs and both 7 days a week.

    That is no kind of family life, it is actually quite sad really.

    Quote Originally Posted by kw123 View Post
    I agree with FL. If we ever end up having another, neither of them will go to private school as we couldn't afford $60k out of post tax salary (likely more by the time they actually would go).

    I'd also spent my money on a house in an area with a good public school if possible. At least then it's an investment (in dollar terms).

  3. #143
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    6,311
    Thanks
    2,387
    Thanked
    4,599
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by beebs View Post
    I honestly don't think you can discount the rankings, even if they are selective. The top 8 schools last year were all public, and some were only partially selective. They were all public. So a 45,000 education is not going to get you in the top 8. What a waste of money, especially if you are in areas close to those schools.

    The other thing I am finding on this thread, is the be all and end all of academic education. What is that about? Some of the most influential people on this planet aren't academic, I place a lot of weight on the arts and that type of thing though. I know everyone doesn't. But I don't automatically think someone is better just because they are academic.
    I completely grew that academic results aren't the be all and end all. I said that earlier. I think just that you can't use results for selective schools and use them as indicative of all public schools.

    As I said earlier though, I don't see money spent on education as being wasted so long as the child benefits from it and emerges as a well rounded, thoughtful and broad minded individuals.

    I don't think a private education is the be all and end all - far from it. And unless a particular school offered something specific for a child of mine I wouldn't dream of slaving 'just' for the sake of sending my child there.

    That being said, the cost of senior schooling at an elite school in Sydney is the same as full time Childcare in the city. And that's taking into account the rebate.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to NancyBlackett For This Useful Post:

    happy wanderer  (14-10-2013)

  5. #144
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    6,311
    Thanks
    2,387
    Thanked
    4,599
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by beebs View Post
    No they aren't, Baulkham Hills in partially selective and that ranked 5th last year.
    Haha my apologies for the 7am googling mistake!

    And I haven't seen last year's list. I'd be interested in it.

    Eta: Baulkham Hills is full selective. I just double checked.
    Last edited by NancyBlackett; 14-10-2013 at 14:57.

  6. #145
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    10,012
    Thanks
    14,124
    Thanked
    7,612
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    I was raised with that too Sonja. But I was a creative type and my mum an academic type, although as soon as she realised she did encourage the creative - she still wanted me to do a degree though.

    A lot of the arts do have degrees, like fine arts, dance, film making, music etc. To be good at any type of art, you have to dedicate you life to it, just like everything else. And you can make money from it - obviously hard to make it huge (who'd want to do that anyway), but if you are good enough, you can make a living from it.

    My DS has a degree and is a musician (which is how we met), I do not have a degree - but am currently doing one (better late than never). I think that with creative types, we usually get there in the end.

    For about 15 years I lived, breathed and slept music, there was nothing else, there could never be anything else. Since I've had kids though - It has toned down - so I thought I'd use the opportunity to study.

    If any of my kids show artistic flair, I will be onto it like a shot and encouraging them to pursue it.

    I am the opposite of you, my DS1 I think may be academic, it is hard to tell because he is 7. But he is doing really well in school, he loves learning about scientific stuff and asks me really intense questions all the time about how blood works and blue whales and stuff. I just sit there going "Can I teach you how to play music?" He says no though. Doh!

    agree with you but I was raised with the view that if you have a degree or a qualification of some sort you'll always have something to fall back on while you do other things (like travel, or be a SAHM for a while, or whatever). Obviously it depends on what qualification you get as some are less useful tha others, but I've always found it easy to get work as a lawyer even after considerable breaks from the profession. My siblings had nursing to fall back on and my deceased brother was a journalist. I guess for me I'd worry how my kids were going to pay the bills etc if they had nothing to go back to. DD1 is showing a strong leaning to artistic fields not academic which is a head spin for DH and I but we'll support her no matter what.[/QUOTE]

  7. #146
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    10,012
    Thanks
    14,124
    Thanked
    7,612
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by NancyBlackett View Post
    I completely grew that academic results aren't the be all and end all. I said that earlier. I think just that you can't use results for selective schools and use them as indicative of all public schools.

    As I said earlier though, I don't see money spent on education as being wasted so long as the child benefits from it and emerges as a well rounded, thoughtful and broad minded individuals.

    I don't think a private education is the be all and end all - far from it. And unless a particular school offered something specific for a child of mine I wouldn't dream of slaving 'just' for the sake of sending my child there.

    That being said, the cost of senior schooling at an elite school in Sydney is the same as full time Childcare in the city. And that's taking into account the rebate.
    I agree with you, it comes down to the school for me, there are two high schools I've got my eye on here. One is Catholic and one public.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to beebs For This Useful Post:

    NancyBlackett  (13-10-2013)

  9. #147
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    10,012
    Thanks
    14,124
    Thanked
    7,612
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by NancyBlackett View Post
    Haha my apologies for the 7am googling mistake!

    And I haven't seen last year's list. I'd be interested in it.
    http://bettereducation.com.au/results/hsc.aspx

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to beebs For This Useful Post:

    NancyBlackett  (13-10-2013)

  11. #148
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Qld
    Posts
    26,930
    Thanks
    2,736
    Thanked
    6,743
    Reviews
    2
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    I did really well in my public high school. I got into my first uni choice... and then didn't go. I'm glad I didn't either - I would have wasted a lot of time and money.

    I think some of my teachers would be disappointed to discover that instead of becoming something grand, I am a beauty therapist. Meh.

    What I want to be is a writer... but at the moment lack the drive for that. I figure if I'm going to write novels, I'm going to do it regardless of education. Doing a uni degree doesn't make you a writer, same as not having one doesn't stop you from being one.

    Most people I know have gone to lead pretty average lives... regardless of which school they went to or how well they did.

  12. #149
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    6,311
    Thanks
    2,387
    Thanked
    4,599
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Thanks!

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to NancyBlackett For This Useful Post:

    beebs  (13-10-2013)

  14. #150
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    10,012
    Thanks
    14,124
    Thanked
    7,612
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by SassyMummy View Post
    I figure if I'm going to write novels, I'm going to do it regardless of education. Doing a uni degree doesn't make you a writer, same as not having one doesn't stop you from being one.
    This, actually a lot of writers believe that Uni stifles your creativity, that it tries to put everyone in a box and forces people to be a certain way, rather than just letting the creative juices flow. Uni doesn't make you a better Director, actor, musician or dancer or any other number of creative professions either.


 

Similar Threads

  1. Special needs schooling
    By YMo7 in forum Home Schooling
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-08-2014, 22:04
  2. Your child's schooling
    By Jarylee in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 01-06-2013, 09:16
  3. Schooling
    By Patience Belmont in forum General Chat
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 19-04-2013, 09:10

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Softmats
With so many amazing reversible designs, the soft and cushioned Premium Bubba Mats are the perfect space for all the family. Not only do they look fantastic; you can also enjoy the quality and comfort for years to come.
sales & new stuffsee all
True Fairies
True Fairies is the first interactive website where children can engage and speak with a real fairy through the unique webcam fairy portal. Each session is tailored to the child, and is filled with enchantment and magic.
Visit website to find out more!
featured supporter
Carmels Beauty Secrets
An online beauty and wellness site which offers simple and effective time saving methods and tips which help you look younger for longer.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!