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  1. #131
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    Like the OP, we have started putting away for education for our children. We are also presently looking at education funds (accounts especially geared for education) as they represent a tax break but we aren't decided on it yet.

    I admit I am mildly amused at the importance placed on what job you end up with at the end of schooling. This has absolutely no significance to me having known plenty of people who've attended private schools and have worked in jobs that would be considered by some of you in here as low brow but they are well rounded individuals who speak fondly of their time in school and the friendships they made.

    This is what is important to me: that my child is safe at school, makes good friends and is surrounded by an ethos that is nurturing and supported by a spiritual base. However, what our child receives at home is just as important. Having a school that assists us with this is another consideration we have.

    We have costed primary and secondary schooling for one child at far less than what is being bandied about on this thread, though. Much less. And that includes inflation. We have actually looked at a few schools and have spoken to them about future attendance (even though our son is a toddler) which apparently isn't unusual.

    I think that rather than go on other people's experiences, one should contact various schools in the area, speak to people, find out about future education costs etc and make your decision based on what you find as well as what your priorities are for your children. Bottom line is, I don't want my children suffering in life through want of a proper education - have met plenty of people in that boat too and it's a miserable life. No thanks. I'd rather work 50 jobs if it means getting the best shot I can give to my kids to be able to get ahead. Around here and with the interferences currently going on in our public education with the appalling NAPLAN system and other junk brought over from America, my husband and I feel we won't find that shot at a public school.

  2. #132
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    Witwicky is offline A closed mouth gathers no foot.
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    Honestly, I don't think it matters. I think it depends on the individual school and the support the child is receiving, as opposed to public vs private. I know plenty of people who went to very expensive private schools and have amounted to not much at all.

    My sister was a nanny for a family who had four children at the local Grammar private school (considered one of the more 'elite' schools in our city, but a lot of bullying and drug use occurred within the school). Three of the four children that she nannied were heavily into drugs, and although they graduated, they didn't really go onto to do anything except mooch off of their parents and continue their drug use. It was actually really sad.

    Likewise, I know plenty of people who went to public schools and have gone to uni and become professionals or started their own businesses etc. One of my best friends is a doctor and went to a public high school.

    I personally went to a private catholic high school and then went onto uni and completed my degree in social science. My younger sister went to the same school, completed a degree and is now onto her second degree. I enjoyed my schooling (regardless of the religious aspect). Our classrooms were quite small and there was a lot of help provided to students - I don't think this is neccesarily always the case with private schools though.

    ETA: I don't believe uni degree = successful. Just advising of our family experiences.
    Last edited by Witwicky; 13-10-2013 at 11:44.

  3. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by FearlessLeader View Post
    This thread now has me convinced that I won't consider private schooling for my kids. I think you would only get potential benefits if you had enough money that putting kids in private school wasn't detrimental to family finances. DP only attended private school because it was important to his dad, so his dad paid the fees on top of child support. If his mum had had to pay it, DP would never have travelled overseas, never been able to afford extra curricular activities and would have had an incredibly stressed out mum who was always worried about money. I don't understand the idea of working hard so your kids can go to private schools. People taking on second jobs, etc. surely having mum and dad around and happy and relaxed is better than any school?
    Completely agree.

  4. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rose&Aurelia View Post
    I disagree. I will work 3 jobs if that means my girls get a private education. Dh is of the same mindset.

    But that is our choice as parents.

    Sent from my HTC One SV using The Bub Hub mobile app
    But wouldn't it be more beneficial to be there with your children in the evenings rather than working?



    I went public all through school and the schools that I attended exceeded the private schools. I was given much more opportunity than I would have been if I had a private education. I'm currently a sahm and still deciding on my career path, but I don't think that's a result of my schooling. I had chosen my subjects from year 9 with my career goal in mind, but as I grew into an adult they changed several times. I'm still learning my passions.

    If we still live in this suburb, dd will be going to the local public primary school. If we move, what school she goes to will be based on how schools compare in that area.
    As for high school, if we're still living here dd will be going to one of the private schools unless the public schools have greatly improved by then. If we move, it will be the same situation as primary school.

  5. #135
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    I think it can matter, but it shouldn't.
    Im very pro public schooling, as I believe all children should have access to the same level of education.

  6. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by happy wanderer View Post
    Like the OP, we have started putting away for education for our children. We are also presently looking at education funds (accounts especially geared for education) as they represent a tax break but we aren't decided on it yet.

    I admit I am mildly amused at the importance placed on what job you end up with at the end of schooling. This has absolutely no significance to me having known plenty of people who've attended private schools and have worked in jobs that would be considered by some of you in here as low brow but they are well rounded individuals who speak fondly of their time in school and the friendships they made.

    This is what is important to me: that my child is safe at school, makes good friends and is surrounded by an ethos that is nurturing and supported by a spiritual base. However, what our child receives at home is just as important. Having a school that assists us with this is another consideration we have.

    We have costed primary and secondary schooling for one child at far less than what is being bandied about on this thread, though. Much less. And that includes inflation. We have actually looked at a few schools and have spoken to them about future attendance (even though our son is a toddler) which apparently isn't unusual.

    I think that rather than go on other people's experiences, one should contact various schools in the area, speak to people, find out about future education costs etc and make your decision based on what you find as well as what your priorities are for your children. Bottom line is, I don't want my children suffering in life through want of a proper education - have met plenty of people in that boat too and it's a miserable life. No thanks. I'd rather work 50 jobs if it means getting the best shot I can give to my kids to be able to get ahead. Around here and with the interferences currently going on in our public education with the appalling NAPLAN system and other junk brought over from America, my husband and I feel we won't find that shot at a public school.
    What is a "proper education" to you?

    The figures spoken about in this thread are the fees of exclusive private schools that run for profit. I don't consider small catholic schools as private.

    I think you'll also find that private schools would place more emphasis on naplan considering results are public on my school website for all to see.

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  8. #137
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    My husband and I went public both primary and high school.

    I worked from the day I left school and also did uni and got a business degree. Then I had 3 kids and am now a SAHM and currently doing a bachelor of criminology.

    My husband failed grade 10, left early in grade 11. He went from job to job, had a massive centrelink debt for lying about not working and then started his own business about 6 years ago and now clears $200k pa which allows me to stay home and now slowly study what I'm interested in.

    In saying that my kids are at a private school for no reason other than I wanted to go to private when growing up and we can afford to send them there. My husband is very pro public but I got the final say

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  10. #138
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    I honestly don't think you can discount the rankings, even if they are selective. The top 8 schools last year were all public, and some were only partially selective. They were all public. So a 45,000 education is not going to get you in the top 8. What a waste of money, especially if you are in areas close to those schools.

    The other thing I am finding on this thread, is the be all and end all of academic education. What is that about? Some of the most influential people on this planet aren't academic, I place a lot of weight on the arts and that type of thing though. I know everyone doesn't. But I don't automatically think someone is better just because they are academic.

  11. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    The figures spoken about in this thread are the fees of exclusive private schools that run for profit. I don't consider small catholic schools as private.
    Quote Originally Posted by redlipsandpearls View Post
    But wouldn't it be more beneficial to be there with your children in the evenings rather than working?.
    I was unaware that religious high schools were excluded from this thread. For me public is state run and private are the rest.

    I would probably send our girls to the best co ed catholic high school we could access easily. But should one of them have an amazing skill or ability that requires outside tutors, lessons etc then I will do whatever it takes to provide for them.


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  13. #140
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    No they aren't, Baulkham Hills in partially selective and that ranked 5th last year.

    Quote Originally Posted by NancyBlackett View Post
    Based on a quick google compare of BRV's list and the list of the selective and partially selective schools in NSW then the top 8 she refers to are all fully selective.

    http://www.schools.nsw.edu.au/gotosc...hs_details.php

    http://www.university-list.net/Austr...ol-100015.html


 

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