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  1. #121
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    I agree with BRV. No one has ever asked me what school I went to (as a lawyer I was led to believe it mattered but have never found that it did) but am very proud of my public education background.

    My question about the selective schools intake was whether the ones topping the list BRV linked were exclusively selective or had to take catchment as well as this would matter in how the results were interpreted.
    @kw123 I don't think anyone would necessarily disagree with you but for many people there is a perception that for kids who might struggle at school without extra encouragement and attention would only get that at a private school.

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    I don't think public vs private can be judged on the outcome job/career at the end of it all. That really annoys me.

    It's more about the class sizes, options given to students along the way (eg. ability to experience lots of different sports/activities), support if students struggle or excel, and if the students actually enjoy school & are engaged. You want the school years to be happy for your child, give a broad range of experiences and help your child what is best for them to do as a career, whether that's working as a garbo or as a Doctor/Lawyer.

    We chose a private school for our ds for Primary School as he is a quick learner and requires lots of intellectual stimulation, but also loves to run around outside. He has a small class (13 children), a highly experienced teacher, the class is very well resourced and he has lots of options for primary school wide activities (science club, drawing club, etc). He's thriving. He is quiet though and had social issues earlier in the year (took ages to get changed for sport, wouldn't go to the toilet at school, etc) and I think he would have been lost in a big public primary school with class sizes of up to 25 (the norm in our area).

    So, to a certain extent it does depend on the child and the school. If your child is more hands on/practical, then a private school that is highly academic is not a good match. And it's all well & good to say that gifted students will excel anyway, but that's not always the case as they can get frustrated that they feel very different if they are one of only a few gifted students in a school (public or private).

    So, save for it and if you don't end up needing it, then you've got money to offer extra out of school experiences like holidays/etc.

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  4. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    I agree with BRV. No one has ever asked me what school I went to (as a lawyer I was led to believe it mattered but have never found that it did) but am very proud of my public education background.

    My question about the selective schools intake was whether the ones topping the list BRV linked were exclusively selective or had to take catchment as well as this would matter in how the results were interpreted.
    @kw123 I don't think anyone would necessarily disagree with you but for many people there is a perception that for kids who might struggle at school without extra encouragement and attention would only get that at a private school.
    Based on a quick google compare of BRV's list and the list of the selective and partially selective schools in NSW then the top 8 she refers to are all fully selective.

    http://www.schools.nsw.edu.au/gotosc...hs_details.php

    http://www.university-list.net/Austr...ol-100015.html

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  6. #124
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    Personally I went to public school, went on to Uni, post grad studies and now in a management position. As a parent I think it depends on the choices available and your personal priorities. My children go to a private school but it's not a private school that prioritises academic achievement, their priorities are the overall wellbeing of the child, personal growth and exploration. They have a strong emphasis on hands on learning and using real experiences to teach, for me that was a more authentic choice for my children. Does that mean if put in a highly regulated environment where they would be expected to conform they would do well? Probably not, but hopefully their education will have given them the skills to make choices more suited to them and still succeed.
    I have seen children thrive in that environment and seen children struggle, which is something you could say about any school, you have to find the right one for your child and I don't think public or private necessarily have much to do with that choice.

  7. #125
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    This thread now has me convinced that I won't consider private schooling for my kids. I think you would only get potential benefits if you had enough money that putting kids in private school wasn't detrimental to family finances. DP only attended private school because it was important to his dad, so his dad paid the fees on top of child support. If his mum had had to pay it, DP would never have travelled overseas, never been able to afford extra curricular activities and would have had an incredibly stressed out mum who was always worried about money. I don't understand the idea of working hard so your kids can go to private schools. People taking on second jobs, etc. surely having mum and dad around and happy and relaxed is better than any school?

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  9. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by FearlessLeader View Post

    I don't understand the idea of working hard so your kids can go to private schools. People taking on second jobs, etc. surely having mum and dad around and happy and relaxed is better than any school?
    Couldn't agree more. This is what I said earlier. I have no intention of never being around and working myself into the ground just so I can pay for school.

    The other thing to remember though is many private schools include as part of the fees extracurricular activities that you'd otherwise pay for (some don't and it's an extra cost).

    I went through high school in the "greed is good" decade, and many kids were lost while their parents worked themselves into divorces and heart attacks. To be fair I think (based on my friends anyway) many of us who were the product of that decade have learned (hopefully) not to make the mistakes of our parents.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FearlessLeader View Post
    This thread now has me convinced that I won't consider private schooling for my kids. I think you would only get potential benefits if you had enough money that putting kids in private school wasn't detrimental to family finances. DP only attended private school because it was important to his dad, so his dad paid the fees on top of child support. If his mum had had to pay it, DP would never have travelled overseas, never been able to afford extra curricular activities and would have had an incredibly stressed out mum who was always worried about money. I don't understand the idea of working hard so your kids can go to private schools. People taking on second jobs, etc. surely having mum and dad around and happy and relaxed is better than any school?
    I disagree. I will work 3 jobs if that means my girls get a private education. Dh is of the same mindset.

    But that is our choice as parents.

    Sent from my HTC One SV using The Bub Hub mobile app

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    I agree with FL. If we ever end up having another, neither of them will go to private school as we couldn't afford $60k out of post tax salary (likely more by the time they actually would go).

    I'd also spent my money on a house in an area with a good public school if possible. At least then it's an investment (in dollar terms).

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    Quote Originally Posted by kw123 View Post
    I agree with FL. If we ever end up having another, neither of them will go to private school as we couldn't afford $60k out of post tax salary (likely more by the time they actually would go).

    I'd also spent my money on a house in an area with a good public school if possible. At least then it's an investment (in dollar terms).
    Absolutely, I'd rather spend our money on living in a suburb with a sense of community and be able to spend more time with my kids rather than stressing about money. My DH and I both went to private schools and it didn't really make much a difference. My brother went to the local public school instead and has had many more opportunities than me (accelerated learning programs etc). DH didn't even end up finishing school and left in year 11!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rose&Aurelia View Post
    I disagree. I will work 3 jobs if that means my girls get a private education. Dh is of the same mindset.

    But that is our choice as parents.

    Sent from my HTC One SV using The Bub Hub mobile app
    Agree with this. My mum worked purely to pay our private school fees. I am extremely grateful that she did. She was still a fabulous mum, she has three extremely successful, well-educated children who have absolutely nothing about our childhood to complain of.

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