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  1. #21
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    So is the advice to give movical at night before bed?
    Maybe we will try that instead of parachoc?

    Anyone got any idea if movical is a better alternative to parachoc?

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    I'm so glad to read this thread as I'm in exactly the same situation with my 14 month old DD.

    She's had a few problems with constipation but now is so terrified of it hurting she will hold onto the poo for days

    She'll scream, tense up, sweat and will not push for days on end, it's heartbreaking

    I've tried coloxyl, pears, prunes, prune juice, nothing works, but I think the reason for this is her holding it in for so long, if she just pooed when she needed too I don't think she'd be constipated iykwim!

    Do you think movicol will work for us or is she too young?

    Any suggestions would be great

  3. #23
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    3bubbys I personally would be careful about giving a 14 month old movical, or anything until I'd seen someone who specialises in constipation. DD1 was treated by a specialist paediatrician in Melbourne when she was around 2 and the preference there was Actilax given at night. Actilax is safe for infants.

    MG DD1 is 8 and still has problems with constipation and now DD2 is developing problems. I'm going to start them on movical today.

  4. #24
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    I haven't read through all the replies so sorry if I'm repeating something:

    My first child had this problem EXACTLY and I can tell you how to get some relief but it will go against everything you have been told thus far.

    Put your daughter on a low fibre diet and see how she goes. I believe you will see an improvement within 48 hours. In her case the high fibre actually makes the problem WORSE. I know this because my son was involved in a study at the RCH, must be 13 years ago now!, they found that high fibre causes more problems for these kids because you are increasing the bulk and making it harder to get out!! Don't worry though - I was advised for years to give him bulkers and laxative and it never improved...not until we finally found a Professor at the RCH that was studying this 'phenomenon', if you can call it that!

    They never did find out WHY these particular kids had it, but it is the villi in the large intestine (the last half metre) that don't work, meaning that once the poo arrives at the large intestine it just stops moving and it backs up and backs up until there is no more holding it in and it busts through. The kids hold it in because of the pain of passing it - so reducing the bulk helps them with passing it. All those softeners are actually adding bulk and adding water.

    I can go on and on about all this so let me know if you want to know. The name of this is Neuronal Intestinal Dysplasia, or NID for short.

    The 'cure' they were offering at the time was a colostomy, which as a nurse I strongly discourage in a young child. When I discussed my refusal for my own son, then 3, saying I would prefer he make his own decision later down the track, the Professor admitted that they had only been doing them two years and were finding that after two years they were failing and having to completely remove the bowel.

    i found a doc when son was 10 and he went on a special diet with supplements for two years for Spastic Colon. This cured him completely and while he still has the problem, he does not now have the issues with toileting.

    I can still remember his red face as he held his breath trying to keep from going - he would hide behind the couch so I couldn't see him and try to convince him to go.
    Last edited by Big Girl; 06-10-2013 at 11:47.

  5. #25
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    Thank you Sonja, DD is under a paed so I might make an appointment.

  6. #26
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    This from the Better Health Channel probably explains better than me. I forgot, but one of the biggest indicators was how long it took the baby to pass meconium when born - for my son it was day 3. Now this would be taken as a symptom needing further investigation - back then I just thought I was lucky!

    The large intestine massages waste along its length to the rectum by rhythmic, muscular contractions of its walls (peristalsis). This activity is controlled by nerves of the enteric nervous system (ENS). Slow transit constipation (STC), formerly known as neuronal intestinal dysplasia (NID), is characterised by the reduced motility (spontaneous movement) within the large intestine, caused by abnormalities of the enteric nerves.

    The unusually slow passage of waste through the large intestine leads to chronic problems, such as constipation and uncontrollable soiling. There is no cure.

    Symptoms of slow transit constipation

    The most common symptoms include:
    Passing bowel motions infrequently
    Constipation
    Uncontrollable soiling
    Abdominal pains
    Nausea
    Poor appetite.
    Less common symptoms include:
    Blood in the stools (poo)
    Haemorrhoids
    Diarrhoea.
    STC can be diagnosed soon after birth

    The first bowel motion after birth isn’t true faeces, but a dark, gluey substance known as meconium. Most of this substance comprises the mucus that layered and protected the bowel lining while the baby was in utero. A newborn with STC may not pass their meconium until 24 hours or more after being born. The delayed passage of meconium may lead doctors to investigate further.

    STC is a neuromuscular problem

    The nerves communicate with muscle fibres by releasing chemical messages called neurotransmitters. These messages are picked up by special receptors in the muscle tissue. If enough receptors are stimulated, the result is muscular contraction.

    Some studies have suggested that children with STC have abnormal neurotransmitters in the muscular layer of their intestinal walls. These abnormalities include a deficiency of a peptide known as substance P, which is thought to contribute to peristalsis. Research also indicates that the nerve cells of the bowel may be abnormal in number, position or appearance.

    Quality of life can be severely affected

    Many children with STC have emotional and behavioural problems, including:
    Constant anxiety about losing control of their bowels in public
    Fear and embarrassment about their condition
    Withdrawal from social situations
    Depression and loss of self-esteem, especially if they are teased by other children at school.
    STC may mimic or coincide with Hirschsprung’s disease

    Hirschsprung’s disease is characterised by the congenital lack of nerve cells in the rectum, large intestine or both. This means that peristalsis of the rectum or large intestine is absent, so that waste simply stalls and can’t be expelled via the anus. The symptoms include severe constipation and obstruction.

    This disease is similar in many ways to STC, which can make diagnosis difficult. A further challenge to diagnosis is that STC and Hirschsprung’s disease quite often occur together.

    Diagnosis of slow transit constipation

    STC is often missed as a diagnosis because of the standard tests used for constipation, including:
    X-ray – to see if the bowel is distended with excess faeces
    Barium enema – a special contrasting liquid is flushed into the bowel via the anus, then x-rays are taken
    A more specialised diagnosis or confirmation of STC should involve one or more of the following:
    Comprehensive assessment by a specialist continence adviser – a child with STC may have a distended abdomen and obvious discomfort.
    Colonic nuclear transit study (NTS) – the child swallows a radioactive dose. Its passage through the bowels is then tracked over three days.
    Full thickness laparoscopic biopsy – a small surgical incision is made in three places on the abdomen and samples are taken of the bowel wall to look at the muscles and nerve supply and the messenger molecules. This should not be mistaken for rectal biopsies.
    Treatment for slow transit constipation

    There is no cure for slow transit constipation. Treatment options may include:
    Drugs to improve bowel motility
    Regular enemas to flush the rectum of faeces
    Interferential electrical stimulation therapy (used in what is known as the TIC TOC treatment trial). The treatment is painless and often increases the child’s bowel motility, improves their bowel emptying and reduces the need for medications, washouts and/or surgery.
    A range of surgery options

    For some families, symptoms may be so severe that surgical options may need to be considered. The type of surgery chosen depends on the location and extent of the affected bowel, and the health and age of the child. Options include:
    A colostomy is formed, where the bowel is re-routed through an artificial hole in the abdominal wall, and a colostomy bag is fitted. Sometimes, a temporary colostomy is performed.
    The appendix may be brought to the surface to create a tiny stoma (opening). This can be done using a laparoscope (telescopic surgery). Enemas can be given regularly directly into the stoma or appendix.
    It is not always possible to treat STC with surgery, as too much of the bowel may be affected.
    Coping strategies

    Strategies that may help your child to cope with STC include:
    Don’t ever chastise your child for soiling. Remember that their bowels are difficult to control.
    Offer pull-up disposable nappies or other continence aids appropriate to your child’s age.
    Allow your child to talk about their feelings.
    Make sure you educate your child about STC, so they realise their bowel control problems are not their fault.
    Devise an ‘action plan’ in consultation with your child’s school, which includes a trusted teacher’s cooperation at toilet time, and easy access to toilets and a shower.
    Join a support group such as the Paediatric Continence Association of Australia.
    Contact a specialist STC clinic.
    Professional counselling for the child and family members may be helpful.
    Where to get help
    Your doctor
    Gastroenterologist
    Continence clinician
    NID Clinic at Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne

    Personal experience has shown me that dietary changes work too. Which makes sense - what goes in must come out! We went Gluten and lactose free for two years and then slowly weaned back into main****** food, noting what made it worse. Son, now 19, still eats 'bad' food but over time has learnt how much he can eat before it affects him and what affects him so bad that he just doesn't bother anymore...

  7. #27
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    Thank you all so much.
    I appreciate everything.

    Today is just horrible.
    I don't even know where to begin.

    She is restless, the screaming is back non stop, she will not sit down, stand up, hold still she is just up, down and running around in what I can only guess is discomfort as she isn't talking.
    I'm on the verge of just taking her to the hospital. More for my sanity because I can't do this. I can deal with lots but this is the first time I have just felt totally run down.

    I literally fell like I can't breathe, my chest feels like I have the stress of everything on it, I feel like I'm about to have a hear attack my chest is pounding so much.
    I just want to break down and tear my hair out.

    It's the weekend, my husband took our son out as he was getting stressed out over everything.
    I'm still in my clothes from yesterday and I feel like a total mess.
    Every second I leave her she screams for me, won't have anything to do with my husband. It's all just me.
    I feel like I'm never going to have a life again if this rules our days much longer.

    I never thought a child's toilet habits could be this stressful and demanding.
    I feel batty and stupid that I'm getting so worked up over a dam poo!!!
    Today is a whole new level as she is even holding back her farts!!!! She is all gassy and bloated.

    Sorry I don't have good news.
    Dd is most likely how she is normally with this but I'm so stressed out it all seems a thousand times worse right now.

  8. #28
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    My son has been at that point twice, and I've used an enema on him.

    Very traumatic on everyone when it gets this bad.

  9. #29
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    I went through this for over 2 years with my daughter, the longest she went was 21 days without a poo, we had many visits to hospital, forced enemas, pain etc. she did grow out of it thank goodness but I really think it started with a poo hurting so she held back which made them hurt more and then of course the bowel stretches and it physically gets harder for them to go. She was on regular parachoc. I'm not sure what fixed it, she has been diagnosed with hasimotos disease (hypothyroid) which causes constipation, but I doubt she had it at 2-3yo. My only advice is to make them sit on the toilet after a meal and sit in a position as if they were reading a book. I understand how stressful it is and people saying "have you tried prune juice" don't help at all. I did see a behavioral pediatrician who assured me she was physically fine and would grow out of it - and turned out he was right. All the best, I know how awful this is.

  10. #30
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    How many days is she Bergeron?
    Personally if she is a few days and that worked up I would work on using a microlax enema on her.
    We have used glycerine supps on our sin, but now he pushes them out. Microlax will stimulate the bowel to push the poo out.

    Maybe not ideal, but you can work from there at getting her regular.

    I hate poo.
    Seriously.
    I hate it

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to moongazer For This Useful Post:

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