+ Reply to Thread
Page 8 of 9 FirstFirst ... 6789 LastLast
Results 71 to 80 of 90
  1. #71
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,846
    Thanks
    6,200
    Thanked
    16,890
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    For those that think the govt should become more involved with what parents feed their kids and that there should be possibly sanctions, how do you see this happening i.e. how should it be put in place?

    I get the concept behind banning it in primary schools, but really it's a band aid measure. If the child eats cocopops every morning, a cold cheese burger and a packet of chips in their lunch box then comes home to maccas or fish and chips every night, is the absence of a can of soft drink really changing anything?

    I'm not sure what the answer is, but it goes far deeper than banning *any* junk food, bc really, we would have to ban everything for it to work. We ban chips, parents will just buy lollies or something else.

    I think some of the issue goes beyond lack of knowledge, or even lazy parenting. Buying a packet of HB pies for $3.50 to feed a family of 4 is much cheaper than a $15 tray of lean steak and $5 worth of vegies. It's cheaper to buy junk from the supermarket than it is to buy meat and fruit and veg, and that's nuts.

  2. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to delirium For This Useful Post:

    1234Guest  (03-10-2013),Boobycino  (02-10-2013),Ffrenchknickers  (03-10-2013),GlitterFarts  (03-10-2013),MonsterMoosMum  (02-10-2013),NancyBlackett  (03-10-2013),OurLittleBlessing  (03-10-2013),SassyMummy  (03-10-2013),snowqu33n  (03-10-2013)

  3. #72
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    19,776
    Thanks
    5,212
    Thanked
    7,063
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    I think a small tax and changing a school canteen menu slightly isn't going to do much for very deep-seated cultural attitudes toward food and nutrition.

    I don't mind so much having Government campaigns when it comes to health, they are the ones who have to come up with the funding for health afterall and some health campaigns have had fantastic results.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Benji For This Useful Post:

    Ffrenchknickers  (03-10-2013)

  5. #73
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,110
    Thanks
    70
    Thanked
    652
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    A 20% increase? So what, everyone has to be punished because of parents who feed their kids too much soft drink?

  6. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Renesme For This Useful Post:

    atomicmama  (03-10-2013),Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (03-10-2013),snowqu33n  (03-10-2013)

  7. #74
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    403
    Thanks
    153
    Thanked
    108
    Reviews
    0
    I think it is great! Soft drink is by far the cheapest option (other than water from a tap) and as a teacher I've had to ban it from class parties AND have seen in brought to school in drink bottles on numerous occasions. I think the flow over of being more expensive for all to buy might help to change the soft drink culture where many people keep it in their fridge as their primary drink. My parents weren't like this when we were younger but certainly are now. America made the link between obesity and soft drink years ago yet since then I believe it has become even more so the 'norm' and the main ****** drink. I do feel it is the 'worse evil' of junk foods as people tend to not calculate/factor calories they drink and the sugar in it makes you more thirsty and apparently hungry so it creates such a vicious cycle. I don't usually support junk food taxes, often I feel the government just benefits from those most in need but I 100% back this one! (oh and I don't know of any primary schools that have soft drink but tons of secondary schools have coke machines etc. And the access to that over lugging around a drink bottle or drinking from forever filthy and broken bubblers would have a huge influence on consumption I believe).

  8. #75
    Busy-Bee's Avatar
    Busy-Bee is offline Offending people since before Del :D
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    11,183
    Thanks
    3,664
    Thanked
    4,704
    Reviews
    2
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Past Moderator - Thank you
    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    For those that think the govt should become more involved with what parents feed their kids and that there should be possibly sanctions, how do you see this happening i.e. how should it be put in place?

    I get the concept behind banning it in primary schools, but really it's a band aid measure. If the child eats cocopops every morning, a cold cheese burger and a packet of chips in their lunch box then comes home to maccas or fish and chips every night, is the absence of a can of soft drink really changing anything?

    I'm not sure what the answer is, but it goes far deeper than banning *any* junk food, bc really, we would have to ban everything for it to work. We ban chips, parents will just buy lollies or something else.

    I think some of the issue goes beyond lack of knowledge, or even lazy parenting. Buying a packet of HB pies for $3.50 to feed a family of 4 is much cheaper than a $15 tray of lean steak and $5 worth of vegies. It's cheaper to buy junk from the supermarket than it is to buy meat and fruit and veg, and that's nuts.
    It's not that I want the government to be more involved in what parents feed children, it's that I think food at tuckshops should provide only quality, nutritious food for children. Primary school age is where children are getting feeding habits that will set them up for life. So whilst it's not practical, feasible or realistic to control what children eat at home, when they are at school examples and standards should be set.

    I don't think anyone has the answer to 'solving' obesity/childhood obesity but surely providing access to only quality food at school would be a set in the right direction. It would be just one piece of the puzzle (I think a PP said that). Whilst we can't 'ban' all junk food, we could apply the 80/20 rule and work out what the worst culprits are and tackle those. I would hazard a guess that soft drink is up there along with fried, fatty foods.

    I don't think high school tuck shops should be selling soft drink either. I realise there's not much you can do if someone buys something out of school but the standards for what is bought in school should be set high.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Busy-Bee For This Useful Post:

    CassJ  (03-10-2013)

  10. #76
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    361
    Thanks
    57
    Thanked
    162
    Reviews
    0
    There is an answer for childhood obesity and it lies with parents. Parents don't take responsibility for their own diets, even if they do take responsibility for their kids. Half of adults are obese, when they get their own health under control their children will follow. The family sets an example that is hard to change even when schools set a higher standard. The cost and effort involved in healthy fresh food is too much for some families too.

    All schools, high school and primary, have junk and soft drinks banned except on 4 red days each year. Eg carnival days. In queensland. Not sure what its like in other states. But obviously the kids are still getting fatter.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to Jennybaby For This Useful Post:

    Ffrenchknickers  (04-10-2013)

  12. #77
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    119
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked
    25
    Reviews
    0
    I couldn't care less. We as a family don't drink the stuff. I hate hate hate that a can of coke costs less than a bottle of water!!! THAT is wrong.

  13. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Lakey For This Useful Post:

    BubinDec  (03-10-2013),CassJ  (03-10-2013),Ffrenchknickers  (04-10-2013)

  14. #78
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    555
    Thanks
    422
    Thanked
    193
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Lakey View Post
    I couldn't care less. We as a family don't drink the stuff. I hate hate hate that a can of coke costs less than a bottle of water!!! THAT is wrong.
    I agree, but my DH does drink it and I still don't care. It's not like there taxing something you need and the government does need a way to pay for the massive amount the obsess people cost the public health system.
    As for schools I love the idea, we don't have any at my kids school and I really don't think there is a need for it.


    Last edited by CassJ; 03-10-2013 at 09:50.

  15. #79
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    my house
    Posts
    17,698
    Thanks
    1,391
    Thanked
    7,288
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Lakey View Post
    I couldn't care less. We as a family don't drink the stuff. I hate hate hate that a can of coke costs less than a bottle of water!!! THAT is wrong.
    But if it is sold at schools, how do you know your kids aren't buying it?

  16. The Following User Says Thank You to BigRedV For This Useful Post:

    SassyMummy  (03-10-2013)

  17. #80
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    403
    Thanks
    153
    Thanked
    108
    Reviews
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Jennybaby View Post
    There is an answer for childhood obesity and it lies with parents. Parents don't take responsibility for their own diets, even if they do take responsibility for their kids. Half of adults are obese, when they get their own health under control their children will follow. The family sets an example that is hard to change even when schools set a higher standard. The cost and effort involved in healthy fresh food is too much for some families too.

    All schools, high school and primary, have junk and soft drinks banned except on 4 red days each year. Eg carnival days. In queensland. Not sure what its like in other states. But obviously the kids are still getting fatter.
    I'm in Vic. I assume by banned you mean the canteen can't sell it? Our canteen uses the traffic light system. I thinks it's ridiculous that this system classes a hot dog and meat pie as 'amber' foods. It's certainly not what I consider a sometimes/proceed with some caution food and kids in my class on their weekly lunch order only ever order these things. I know they then eat maccas for tea on swimming night, Friday take away treat night, hot dogs at footy on the weekend etc. I think the traffic light system is screwy if it's reinforcing that to kids as being ok! No wonder they ask me if their white bread and butter ham and sauce sandwich is healthy...


 

Similar Threads

  1. Who's the tough one?
    By Cue in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 13-06-2013, 00:02
  2. it's all getting a bit tough
    By Little Miss Muffet in forum Postnatal depression
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 21-05-2013, 12:52

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
BAE The Label
Versatile, premium maternity wear that you will love throughout pregnancy and long after. Cleverly designed for for all stages of motherhood so that you can 'Just be you (+1)'.
sales & new stuffsee all
Bub Hub Sales Listing
HAVING A SALE? Let parents know about it with a Bub Hub Sales listing. Listings are featured on our well trafficked Sales Page + selected randomly to appear on EVERY page
featured supporter
Baby Car Seats and Infant Car Restraints
Buying a baby car seat? Check out our 'go-to' links here!
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!