+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    over there....no over there:)
    Posts
    1,624
    Thanks
    921
    Thanked
    370
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Would you see a speech therapist?

    My dd2 is almost 4.she goes to daycare twice a week and speaks very well..she has a great memory for everything and is a bright child. .However she cannot say L's
    Eg her little sister is Lucie and she calls her ucie
    Leg is eg
    Lolly is olly
    When reciting the alphabet she can say L but when its at the start of a word she cannot...
    I don't know what to do about it..we have tried pronunciation with her but it makes no difference. .would a speech therapist help? Or do you think perhaps as she gets older she will be able to say L's??

    Sent from my GT-N7105 using The Bub Hub mobile app

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    10,611
    Thanks
    404
    Thanked
    1,918
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    L is a tricky one. My son has just turned 5, and he says Y for L, I think.

    I had him assessed at 2 (delayed speech), 3 (within range) and then just recently (some dodgy pronunciation).

    I can't remember what they said about L.

    I seem to remember her saying that they should not drop sounds, if they can't pronounce it properly, then they should use the mispronunciation rather than omit. Eg. my son says geen from green. he can't say the r, which is nomral, but he should say gween rather than omitting sound completely

    I probably wouldn't bother for the sake of 1 letter at 4, but would reconsider before school.

    It's amazing how they just suddenly pick it up though. My son has never been able to say words like snake, spider, swim (says nakes, piders, wims - moves s from front to back where word starts with an s and a hard vowel). Then recently he could just say them properly.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    1,292
    Thanks
    409
    Thanked
    752
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I wouldn't worry, L is one of the later developing sounds. Usually around 5ish. If that is the only tricky bit for her and she has picked up other sounds fine then I would suspect it will just come with time

  4. #4
    FearlessLeader's Avatar
    FearlessLeader is offline Winner 2013 - Most Memorable Thread
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    10,726
    Thanks
    2,499
    Thanked
    9,122
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    My DS says Y for L at the start of a word and W in the middle of a word. I vaguely remember seeing a chart of which letters they should have when, and L wasn't until 6 or so.
    I don't know about the omitting/substituting thing though. Have you been for her 4 year check at the health nurse? You could ask her.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked
    2
    Reviews
    0
    Hi. I'm a speech path. Given that your daughter is omitting l completely, I think a bit of therapy is warranted. These phonological ( sound) issues are different to lisps ( where the sound is said but distorted) and have implications for literacy development also. All in all, then, a couple of sessions can make quite a difference - not just to her speech. Hope that helps.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    834
    Thanks
    157
    Thanked
    520
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I used to say y for l. Lucky was Yucky for example. I learnt to pronounce l's properly when I was around 7. My mum used to show me how tto make the sound with my tongue and repeat words like "lion, lollipop" etc.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    2,472
    Thanks
    740
    Thanked
    563
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by willowhope View Post
    Hi. I'm a speech path. Given that your daughter is omitting l completely, I think a bit of therapy is warranted. These phonological ( sound) issues are different to lisps ( where the sound is said but distorted) and have implications for literacy development also. All in all, then, a couple of sessions can make quite a difference - not just to her speech. Hope that helps.
    Sorry to sabotage thread but my almost four has a lisp quite noticeable and he cant pronounce c/k. He always says d. Is this a problem? DD never did this so not sure what is normal?

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using The Bub Hub mobile app

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked
    2
    Reviews
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by ck2b View Post
    Sorry to sabotage thread but my almost four has a lisp quite noticeable and he cant pronounce c/k. He always says d. Is this a problem? DD never did this so not sure what is normal?

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using The Bub Hub mobile app
    Hi ck2b. In a speech path world (crazily obsessive sound land) substituting k for d is considered a phonological issue ( technically fronting - saying the sound towards the front of the mouth - and voicing - substituting the 'soft' t for the voiced d). Lisps are the same sound, said 'not quite right'.
    This substitution ( k > d) is reasonably common for a 3 year old, and if he is making the g sound, he will probably manage k before long. That said, as you move into 4 years of age, assessment would probably be appropriate. Another trick you can try ( if your DS is comfortable and it's a fun and positive experience) is to trying getting him to hold down the tip of his tongue as he copies you saying k ( best if you show him how by doing it to your tongue at the same time). This mechanically forces the back of the tongue (where k is made) to move - and voila!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    2,472
    Thanks
    740
    Thanked
    563
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Thanks for that. There are quite a few other mispronounced words. F stead of s d instead of th. DD could speak well early on so compared to her there seems to be a problem but I'm not sure what's normal. DD was seeing a speech path for vocal cord nodules so I've worked with them before but for different issues. Thanks for that though. ..he'll be 4 in December. Might get the MCHN to have a listen.

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using The Bub Hub mobile app

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    3,288
    Thanks
    688
    Thanked
    915
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    We started to see a speech pathologist as ds can't say F. Eg fish = pish.

    Preschool picked it up and our Dr also suggested it.

    He's been going for 4 weeks and is pretty good but you have to remind him as he forgets to use F.

    You can always try it and see how you go???


 

Similar Threads

  1. Speech therapist for 8 week old
    By Lincolns mummy in forum General Child Health Issues
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 20-09-2013, 21:29
  2. Finding a speech therapist
    By MsTruth in forum Perth
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 15-03-2013, 13:37
  3. Speech therapist for 4 year old in Redlands, Brisbane
    By Chew the Mintie in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-12-2012, 09:52

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
sales & new stuffsee all
Bub Hub Sales Listing
HAVING A SALE? Let parents know about it with a Bub Hub Sales listing. Listings are featured on our well trafficked Sales Page + selected randomly to appear on EVERY page
featured supporter
Pea Pods Reusable Nappies
Pea Pods are the smart choice when it comes to choosing what's best for you, your baby and the environment. Affordable and simple to use, Pea Pods keep your baby dry & happy. Visit our website to find your nearest stockist or order online.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!