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  1. #11
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    We try and encourage our 2yo to at least try the food. 2 mouthfuls minimum before we give her something different. Our rationale is that we want her to try food and experience different tastes. If she refuses to eat anything after the inital 2 mouthfuls but is saying she is hungry she gets a yoghurt. We dont cook seperate meals.

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  3. #12
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    My kids eat what they are given or they get nothing and no treats to follow. So for example, if my daughter refuses to eat her breakfast that's fine but she gets nothing else as well as no treats throughout the day. Same with my son. Mind you I try not to serve them meals I know they don't like. It may seem harsh but I now have a 3 year old who will eat anything and healthily compared to her friends whose parents beg them to eat something and they don't but then they have ice-cream and so forth.

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  5. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaenerysT View Post
    Tell her what you've made for dinner and asks if she's going to have some, when she says no, don't serve her, don't even put a plate down, sounds cruel, but you've got to work with their currency, biggest one being attention.
    So then she needs to go elsewhere from the table while you and your partner eat, as the table "is just for those who are eating".
    It'd be different if she genuinely doesn't like the food, but as you know now, it's a power play. She eats anything at child care because they won't give her anything else, they get one option, and if they don't eat, they go hungry. So she just knows she can whinge with you til she gets what she wants.

    You won't have to do it too many times, just don't give in!!

    Yup this ^

  6. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renesme View Post
    My kids eat what they are given or they get nothing and no treats to follow. So for example, if my daughter refuses to eat her breakfast that's fine but she gets nothing else as well as no treats throughout the day. Same with my son. Mind you I try not to serve them meals I know they don't like. It may seem harsh but I now have a 3 year old who will eat anything and healthily compared to her friends whose parents beg them to eat something and they don't but then they have ice-cream and so forth.
    Excellent and no it's not harsh, it's exactly what we do.

  7. #15
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    Thanks all :-) she's only 14 months so not sure how much I can reason with her or expect her to understand a 2 mouthful minimum, but I will start limiting what's on offer. Tonight we'll have her favourite meal then tomorrow something different, with maybe pasta which I know she will eat a few pieces of, so at least she might eat something.

  8. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaenerysT View Post
    Tell her what you've made for dinner and asks if she's going to have some, when she says no, don't serve her, don't even put a plate down, sounds cruel, but you've got to work with their currency, biggest one being attention.
    So then she needs to go elsewhere from the table while you and your partner eat, as the table "is just for those who are eating".
    It'd be different if she genuinely doesn't like the food, but as you know now, it's a power play. She eats anything at child care because they won't give her anything else, they get one option, and if they don't eat, they go hungry. So she just knows she can whinge with you til she gets what she wants.

    You won't have to do it too many times, just don't give in!!
    I actually don't agree with this - at 14 months I think she is too young to understand - I fear all she will get out of it is a fear of dinner time or it may create a bad association with dinner time?

    I always made dinner a fun time, time to all sit down together and talk and share a meal, TV off, toys away and I always gave what we ate which always included a bowl of steamed veggies or salad and then would serve his dinner as we would , put a bit of everything on the plates and just eat, if he ate it that's great, if not we never made a big deal out of it but always would talk about how much DH or I liked the food , in his nearly 3 years the only thing he wont eat is potato

    now at 3 he gets to pick a dinner once a week ( usually butter chicken or fish tacos!) and normally "helps" prepare it with me and choose which veggies we buy at the fruit shop

    OP at 14 months she is just asserting her independence and authority and yes testing you! Try not make dinner a battle, if she does not eat much try make breakfast or lunch a bigger meal and give veggies as an afternoon snack maybe ? Good luck!

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  10. #17
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    I never make DS a separate dinner. He eats what we eat. I'd keep offering her the same foods. Eat it in front of her and pretend that you're really enjoying it.
    I must admit that I have at times forced DS to eat something. It's only happened a handful of time and it has taken us 1.5 hours to finish that meal but he now eats everything we give him. If he doesn't eat, my threat is always "do you want mummy to feed you?" To which he replies "no!" And starts feeding himself. I've been screwed when he says yes though and I'm stuck there feeding him lol
    If it's something he *truly* hates and it makes him gag then I'll make him a sandwich but that's very rare.
    If she can eat everything at daycare then she can eat everything at home. Have you tried giving her the dinner you've prepared and not paid much attention to her? I think that sometimes if we make a big deal, they refuse to eat.

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    My daughter's 12 months (today!), and I do as follows:

    -Usually give her what I'm eating/we're eating.
    -She always feeds herself, unless it's something that REALLY needs a spoon (like yoghurt). Anything on a spoon, if she doesn't want to eat it, we don't attempt to make her.
    -Don't make any fuss or mention of how much she's eating.
    -If she eats it, that's great...if she doesn't, that's up to her.
    -If she doesn't eat/doesn't eat much, she doesn't get anything else until the next meal (except maybe a breast feed if she wants it).

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    I would just keep offering, if she doesn't eat it then she's not that hungry. Eventually she'll start eating it. Try different things, lots of variety and don't make a big deal out of meals.

    Personally I'd also ditch the bottle of milk before bedtime and just make sure she gets some dairy during the day. Maybe also avoid snacks for 1.5-2hrs before dinner time

  13. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    I actually don't agree with this - at 14 months I think she is too young to understand - I fear all she will get out of it is a fear of dinner time or it may create a bad association with dinner time?

    I always made dinner a fun time, time to all sit down together and talk and share a meal, TV off, toys away and I always gave what we ate which always included a bowl of steamed veggies or salad and then would serve his dinner as we would , put a bit of everything on the plates and just eat, if he ate it that's great, if not we never made a big deal out of it but always would talk about how much DH or I liked the food , in his nearly 3 years the only thing he wont eat is potato

    now at 3 he gets to pick a dinner once a week ( usually butter chicken or fish tacos!) and normally "helps" prepare it with me and choose which veggies we buy at the fruit shop

    OP at 14 months she is just asserting her independence and authority and yes testing you! Try not make dinner a battle, if she does not eat much try make breakfast or lunch a bigger meal and give veggies as an afternoon snack maybe ? Good luck!
    This, plus with DS I put an assortment of things in his plate rather than one dish as such.... Fruit, chicken or fish (usually have to crumb it for him as won't eat meat), steamed veg, a small dinner roll... I don't fancy things up too much as he needs to learn how to eat good whole food before adding bad food (sauces etc). He'll normally be excited by at least one thing on his plate. Some nights he's just happy to eat a banana and that's ok with me, it's good for him at least.

    Another thing, some toddlers prefer their big meal at lunch or late morning, and just a light evening meal/snack.


 

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