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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillicity View Post
    When my kids were beginning to read, we heard from a friend about Hooked On Phonics. Had great success with it. When they started school, they were miles ahead of the rest of the kids.
    What is the point of them being "miles ahead" of the rest of the kids?

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    I teach in nsw and no way would I expect a child who has just started school to read a book or add 2 digit numbers.
    I teach in QLD and I wouldn't expect a child who has just started school to read either, however this far into the school year I would.

    I teach year 1 and I'm surprised to hear prep (or equivalent) are doing two digit addition as well! I don't even do that first up with my class.

    My son is in prep (started when he was 4 turned 5 in April) he can read home readers at level 5 fluently at school he is reading around a level 8 I think. Although he is a high flyer and not what I would expect from the majority of students. He is also able to calculate two digit addition sums mentally but again not something I would expect as the norm.
    Last edited by Theboys&me; 26-10-2013 at 06:43.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    What is the point of them being "miles ahead" of the rest of the kids?
    I just wanted to touch on this point..... If I had a choice I wouldn't want my child to be miles ahead of their peers, especially in the early years.

    My DD who is in Grade 1, is "miles ahead" of her classmates at reading, writing, literacy. Through nothing that we have done at home, moreso a natural gift. She HATES it, it has really really negatively affected her. While the rest of her class is grouped into ability groups during literacy (big groups of perhaps 5 kids), she is paired off with one boy who is very gifted and on the autism spectrum to do silent reading and grade 3-4 work sheets.

    She often comes home upset and has said "I wish I wasn't a good reader so that I can be in a bigger literacy group and do the fun activities with my friends"

    I know this also reflects on her teacher not being able to appropriately extend the kids who are further ahead, but this is a reality for these kids. Not all teachers can cope with kids that are "miles ahead" and if my DD could choose she would choose to be dead on average. It makes me sad to think that at her age (6) she is already thinking about not fitting in....

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    @Mum2EandR - that's really sad to hear. Basically the school is failing your DD...

    In my experience, kids that learn to read confidently at an early age also have greater general confidence and interest in learning. That your DD's school sees fit to segregate her, efectively isolating her and punishing her talent is very distressing and will rapidly undo those benefits.

    Is it possible to speak to them and explain how it makes your daughter feel? There might be alternatives - e.g. "dropping her down" into a larger reading group where she can focus on helping the others to learn to read better as much as on reading herself. In theory this will help her to see her talents as beneficial, helping her friends to learn and being a senior among her peers.

    Sticking her in a corner with Rainman JR because the teacher doesn't think she needs any attention is not helpful!

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    Thanks @KateBishop it is quite sad. This is also her second year of formal schooling (we are in Qld) and she has had 'share teachers' both years. There is a big difference in how her teachers handle her talent. Last year she had one amazing teacher and her confidence flourished. The other teacher was also pretty good. This year she has one teacher that is particularly unhelpful. Unfortunately approaching her has done nothing, and although the other teacher is good she is only there two days aargh!

    Term 4 now so hopefully next year she will get a teacher that 'gets' it!

    She came home most upset yesterday because they had to come up with names for their literacy groups and her friends were in groups like 'princess butterflies' and 'the wonderland girls' etc. 'Rainman Jnr' - who is gorgeous, but very ASD insisted that they be the 'wise wizards'..... She was not happy LOL!!!

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    Default This might be helpful

    It's a good thing for you, to take the first move of teaching your child the art of reading before sending them off to school. All I can say is that, take it slowly and make it enjoyable as possible for the both of you. The best approach of learning is when you also have fun on what you are doing. Here's a link that can provide you reading programs , that can teach you on how to help your kid become smarter.

    www.thiskidcanread.com.


    I hope this can help you in any way possible. Please update . Good luck!


 

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