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  1. #1
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    Default How to teach my son to read?

    How do i teach my son to read?

    i have been getting the PM books. How many books should he read till i move up to level 1? so when would i know when to move up to level 1?

    Does he have to learn 100 sight works before reading?

    How many books of each level does he have to read before i get level 2 books and so on?

    How did your child read and how long does it take to move up levels and how many of the same level book to read?

  2. #2
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    I can't tell you how to teach kids to read but I still remember how I learned.

    I was given little golden books and had them read to me a time or two, then was asked if I could read it back. Once I could, I had the alphabet written out for me to copy, then I was asked to rewrite the little golden book I had. Every time I finished doing the process I got a new one, so maybe once a month once I learned the alphabet and how to write it. I always had the words explained and told other words that mean the same thing (age appropriately) and then when I was reading the book I was asked randomly to explain what was said or something.
    When I got older then and didnt understand words in books I was encouraged to read the whole sentence and try and figure it out from the semtence context. When I thought I had I went and told them and they told me if I was right or not.

    I found it a lot of fun and incredibly effective. It started at about age 2, independant reading encouragement but even before then I was read a lot to so that might have helped and I know the words in the books read to me were changed so I learned a wider vocabulary at the same time.

    I dunno if its effective for other kods though as I havent tried. Its the method ill be using for DD since I found it fun and enjoyable so we'll see.

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    Learning to read is about much more than recognising letters on a page, that is just part of the journey.

    Start with some pre-reading skills - holding the book properly, looking at the cover and title - what can you see? What so you think the book might be about? Who wrote the book? - flick through the book and look at the pictures - is it a story? Or is it a book that has facts? Etc.

    By all means start to learn some basic sight words but recognise that many sight words at a young age are not 'read' by children - they recognise that that particular pattern/image means xx - just as if we were travelling overseas and came to recognise the word 'exit' written in a different language.

    The PM reader series is designed to be used in schools - either as a reading series or as home readers - and children are assessed to their level through running records and teacher assessments.

    My advice would be to speak with your child's teacher or education professional about how they are approaching reading at school so you have a consistent approach.

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    I used to teach kids to read as part of my tutoring work I did at uni.

    Start with the alphabet. Concentrate on the sounds the letters make. Then start with basic words you can sound out - cat, up, etc.

    There are lists you can google of basic sight words too. You're best off using phonics and sight words as neither is sufficient on its own.

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    My child is 5, she can't read. She will learn in school next year. At the moment, she is interested in letters and is learning how to write each letter.

    How old is he? Any particular reason you want him to read if he isn't in school yet?

    Children need to know the letters and that letters make sounds. Then they need to learn to put the sounds together to read words. They also need to learn sight words because they can't be sounded out.

    There's also more to reading that just barking at the words. Reading should be for meaning and enjoyment.
    Last edited by BigRedV; 03-09-2013 at 05:33.

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    I would be hesitant teaching your child read before school. We taught dd letters& writing but once she started prep she learnt phonics which was very different to the way we were taught & it confused her a little bit. She was kinda a step ahead the phonics & had to learn that. She's leaps & bounds ahead now though & the phonics really do help them read quicker she's reading now at a grade 2 level & only in prep because of the phonics & there unique way of helping kids recognize sounds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    My child is 5, she can't read. She will learn in school next year. At the moment, she is interested in letters and is learning how to write each letter.

    How old is he? Any particular reason you want him to read if he isn't in school yet?

    Children need to know the letters and that letters make sounds. Then they need to learn to put the sounds together to read words. They also need to learn sight words because they can't be sounded out.

    There's also more to reading that just barking at the words. Reading should be for meaning and enjoyment.
    This. Read first to develop a love of reading not to bark at words.

  10. #8
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    My dd1 loves reading so her montisori teacher suggested if she is interested to start with the basics now (she is 3).

    I purchased some level 1 readers with peppa pig and the like, and we have been talking about the front cover, back cover, spine and title.

    When we read the book I would run my finger under each word, now dd likes to do that bit, I just have to make sure she's not moving her finger so fast!

    I have also been teaching her phonics.

    On advice from her monti teacher, we aren't pushing it, we only use these methods if she wants to

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    My DD was also enthusiastic about reading at about 3 so started doing reading eggs. They start with single letter phonics but don't wait untill they've covered the whole alphabet before introducing blends and high frequency sight words. The program is really fun and engaging and worked in well with her being read to by a parent daily.

    As PPs have mentioned reading is a lot more than reciting words out of a book. It's being able to decode new words based on context. Eg. A because it's a street sign, based on what is in the illustration or the rest of the sentence.

    The appropriate book level for a child to be reading by themselves would have 2 words they don't know for every 5 that they do. If your child is struggling with more than 2 words for every 5 then the book is too hard. If they only come across a new/difficult word in eg. every 10 then the book is too easy.

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    I recommend the reading eggs program. That's how my 7 & 6 yr olds learnt to read. They were keen, I had no idea what to do, so I googled and reading eggs came up.
    My girls now read a year above where they should be.

    Sent from my U8860 using The Bub Hub mobile app

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