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  1. #1
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    Default Has anyone used a Doppler?

    Has anyone used a Doppler? If so, what brand and when did you first hear the heartbeat?

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    I did and highly recommend them.. It was definitely my life saver and reassurance that everything was all good.
    I have the angelsounds jumper. Think it cost about $30 with p&h on eBay. Took about 3 weeks to arrive so didn't get it until I was about 13 weeks and I heard the heartbeat straight away.
    Last edited by kdsd; 02-09-2013 at 11:30.

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    I got one from sweet beats (website) and it arrived next business day.. I ant think what model it is but it's the $199 one and a couple of people recommended this particular one...

    I'm only 9 weeks and not had much luck finding a hb yet...I'm not too fussed yet as I think I read somewhere that it might not be until about 11 weeks...


    Angel Baby ~Skye~ 21/11/2012

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    I had a Sonoline B which I bought off eBay. I loved it and used it almost everyday from about 12 weeks until I could regularly feel bubs move.

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    Quote Originally Posted by munchkin859 View Post
    I got one from sweet beats (website) and it arrived next business day.. I ant think what model it is but it's the $199 one and a couple of people recommended this particular one...

    I'm only 9 weeks and not had much luck finding a hb yet...I'm not too fussed yet as I think I read somewhere that it might not be until about 11 weeks...


    Angel Baby ~Skye~ 21/11/2012
    I am 11 weeks today and haven't been able to hear anything....I am starting to get a bit anxious but I have read 12 weeks it normal.

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    I think that the thing to note if anyone does get a Doppler, it's important to realize that everyone is different... Placement of baby, placenta, etc so whilst some may find hb really early, others, not so early! I wish I was early, but hey go! What can you do...


    Angel Baby ~Skye~ 21/11/2012

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    I think with a Doppler it's normal not to hear anything for at least 12 weeks but even 14. I went to my OB for my weekly 'reassurance' scan at 14 weeks that his midwife does for me and there was a different midwife covering for her and she was only qualified to use the Doppler. She said she probably wouldn't be able to find the heartbeat, that I was too early. She did find it for a split second but the baby was moving too much to hold on to it. So there's many reasons why you won't hear it, too early, baby moving too much and position of your placenta, etc. I think before 12 weeks is probably too early.

    We've been recommended sweetbeats like Munch but haven't decided on one yet.

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    Not sure if this is true but from what ive bee told with dopplers you need to limit the use of them. I was told no more than once a week. The sonographer at my 12w and 20 w anomaly scan said it 'heats the tissue' i.e. the baby and its not good to do too often.

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    They are safe, there is no evidence they cause any probs at all. This article is pretty informative:


    Chrissie Hammonds
    Midwife sonographer and BabyCentre's expert on scans.

    You can buy or hire portable ultrasound Doppler machines from many online companies. However, most doctors and midwives advise against using them at home.

    One of the main concerns with using these devices at home is that they are meant for professionals. It takes many years of training and practice to find and correctly identify a baby's heartbeat.

    Not being able to find your baby's heartbeat could cause you a lot of worry. You can't always be sure it is your baby's heartbeat you are hearing. It's very easy to pick up the sound of blood flowing through the placenta or your own vessels instead and mistake this for a heartbeat. This is why you're advised not to use a Doppler at home, because it could be falsely reassuring.

    From the point of view of the technology they use, fetal Dopplers are believed to be perfectly safe. They are pocket-sized, battery-operated devices that send out high-frequency ultrasound waves. They usually have a handset of controls, a built-in speaker and a transducer which is placed against your bump.

    The ultrasound waves pass through your skin and tissue and then bounce back. This bounce is then translated into sound so that you can hear, for example, the sound of your baby's heart beating. You need to put gel on your skin to help with the transmission of the waves.

    The British Medical Ultrasound Society (BMUS) says that there has never been any evidence of harm resulting from the use of ultrasound in pregnancy. Hand-held Dopplers work by using very low power levels, called continuous wave Doppler. This means they are safe to use over a long period. The CTG machines that midwives sometimes use in labour to monitor a baby’s heartbeat electronically work in the same way.

    A Doppler ultrasound scan uses something different, called pulsed wave Doppler, to measure blood flow. The ultrasound beam in pulsed Doppler has to be focused in one small area. This kind of Doppler is of a higher intensity and is therefore only used for a particular reason, for example, to check if the placenta is working properly. It's not recommended for use over long periods.

    Rather than buying your own Doppler machine, it may be better to find out how your baby is doing in other ways. Pay attention to your baby's movements, once you can feel them, and go to all your antenatal appointments. These are important ways of monitoring your baby's health.

    If you notice a change in your baby's movements, contact your midwife or doctor straight away. Don't just reassure yourself by listening in with your Doppler. You may not recognise changes in the rate or rhythm of your baby's heartbeat that need checking.

    If you still feel that you wish to buy a Doppler for home use, there are a few things you should bear in mind:
    Talk to your midwife or doctor about buying a Doppler. Or next time you have a routine scan, ask your sonographer what she thinks.


    Ignore any claims from a manufacturer that a device can pick up a heartbeat from nine weeks. Even your midwife won't try to listen to your baby's heart in your first trimester. This is because your uterus (womb) is still in your pelvis. The device won't usually work until you are at least 13 weeks pregnant.


    Check that the product conforms to safety standards and comes with a warranty.


    Compare prices and look at what's included. Some Dopplers include batteries, gel and cases; others don't.


    Make sure there are instructions for use and advice on how to interpret what you are hearing.


    Only use gel formulated for use with ultrasound. Other gels or oils cause excess static and may damage the Doppler probe.


    Show references


    http://www.babycentre.co.uk/x557549/...#ixzz2diht5w8r

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    Quote Originally Posted by Atropos View Post
    They are safe, there is no evidence they cause any probs at all. This article is pretty informative:


    Chrissie Hammonds
    Midwife sonographer and BabyCentre's expert on scans.

    You can buy or hire portable ultrasound Doppler machines from many online companies. However, most doctors and midwives advise against using them at home.

    One of the main concerns with using these devices at home is that they are meant for professionals. It takes many years of training and practice to find and correctly identify a baby's heartbeat.

    Not being able to find your baby's heartbeat could cause you a lot of worry. You can't always be sure it is your baby's heartbeat you are hearing. It's very easy to pick up the sound of blood flowing through the placenta or your own vessels instead and mistake this for a heartbeat. This is why you're advised not to use a Doppler at home, because it could be falsely reassuring.

    From the point of view of the technology they use, fetal Dopplers are believed to be perfectly safe. They are pocket-sized, battery-operated devices that send out high-frequency ultrasound waves. They usually have a handset of controls, a built-in speaker and a transducer which is placed against your bump.

    The ultrasound waves pass through your skin and tissue and then bounce back. This bounce is then translated into sound so that you can hear, for example, the sound of your baby's heart beating. You need to put gel on your skin to help with the transmission of the waves.

    The British Medical Ultrasound Society (BMUS) says that there has never been any evidence of harm resulting from the use of ultrasound in pregnancy. Hand-held Dopplers work by using very low power levels, called continuous wave Doppler. This means they are safe to use over a long period. The CTG machines that midwives sometimes use in labour to monitor a baby’s heartbeat electronically work in the same way.

    A Doppler ultrasound scan uses something different, called pulsed wave Doppler, to measure blood flow. The ultrasound beam in pulsed Doppler has to be focused in one small area. This kind of Doppler is of a higher intensity and is therefore only used for a particular reason, for example, to check if the placenta is working properly. It's not recommended for use over long periods.

    Rather than buying your own Doppler machine, it may be better to find out how your baby is doing in other ways. Pay attention to your baby's movements, once you can feel them, and go to all your antenatal appointments. These are important ways of monitoring your baby's health.

    If you notice a change in your baby's movements, contact your midwife or doctor straight away. Don't just reassure yourself by listening in with your Doppler. You may not recognise changes in the rate or rhythm of your baby's heartbeat that need checking.

    Ignore any claims from a manufacturer that a device can pick up a heartbeat from nine weeks. Even your midwife won't try to listen to your baby's heart in your first trimester. This is because your uterus (womb) is still in your pelvis. The device won't usually work until you are at least 13 weeks pregnant.
    ^ this. I HATE it when women I'm caring for tell me they have a Doppler. There are occasions when even I'm not sure what I'm hearing and get a colleague to check the heart rate. Being aware of baby movements is far more reassuring to midwives than what you may or may not have heard through a Doppler. Any decrease or absence of movements is usually the first sign of concern. My advice is please don't use a Doppler at home unless you or your partner are qualified to use them and interpret what you're hearing.

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