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  1. #11
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    Thanks for that. He has a few behaviours that makes me wonder like arm flapping sometimes but nothing else significant.

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  2. #12
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    Thanks for all the replies. I still have big concerns but I seem to be the only one. My husband thinks I'm crazy as does my mum. My paediatrician won't even talk about the prospect of autism until he's 2 but I've honestly had these feeling since he was 4 months old. Maybe I expect too much of an 11.5 month old??? I'm trying to enjoy him but everytime he does an odd thing I go into a panic!

  3. #13
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    Hi mumma2503

    i know where u coming from my sons is also 11.5 month old does the same thing as urs does.. Mine however had to be seen by a physio therapist when his 6 month health check up was really bad.. Anyhow a long the track she kept pointing me to the direction to have him checked for autism. I questioned here competency as she was supposed do activities and all she did was judging my son.. He felt the pressure of course and never liked it there.. Daycare brought him light and learned so many things and as soon i move to qld i will go again. Does ur bubba go to daycare? To be honest i wouldn't be worried just yet and play with him all sorts of social activities, or maybe he is just busy learning other things. If u really concerned maybe u can get an referral to a developmental paediatrician for an assessment.. ,
    anyhow, would be cool if u could keep us posted how it turned out, interesting to know

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  5. #14
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    I feel like im the only one with concerns but I have read a lot about autism so I feel like I know what to look out for. I have seen a developmental paediatrician at 6, 9months and will go again when he turns one. He pretty much said he wouldn't even consider talking about autisn in a baby so long. I felt like he thought I was crazy. He sent a letter to my GP after the 9 month check that said
    "I think his development is tracking very reasonably. He is a little quiet, with not a lot of babbling, and tends to be quite reserved from a social perspective but certainly engaged today and by the time he left he have a big smile and laugh. I've reassured mum again. Dad is not concerned at all."
    I know that sounds quite positive but Im still not convinced. I guess he could just be shy as he is very quiet until he is comfortable. It's so hard and I don't want it getting in the way of enjoying him.

  6. #15
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    Would be nice to keep in touch to find out how it turned out once he reached the age where he can be checked if there any more concerns... As o said my bubba does exactly the same thing and will have him checked when he still not doing it when he is 18 month or so.

  7. #16
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    Honestly, if you are having these feelings, I would personally trust them. My DH thought I was being silly when I thought those things about my DS, It took 8 trips to different GPs until someone referred me to a paed. The paed thought I was completely silly thinking my DS was on the spectrum. And then I begged for a referral to ASPECT and they said they knew within 5 minutes that he was on the spectrum. This was in the early days - he is 4 now and it is clear he is on the spectrum, severe speech delay, SPDs, hates change, meltdowns etc. But back then it could have just been a kid who wasn't picking stuff up as fast etc...but I just felt there was something going on.

    Having said all that, it could just be that your LO is quirky etc. But if you are having those feelings, then I wouldn't dismiss them, you know your child best. Good luck!

  8. #17
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    Oh dear! Now I'm really freakish out! I guess there's nothing I can do. Will love him all the same. I do suffer from anxiety so don't know how much of it is that or a true gut feeling and there is something wrong. What signs did your son have beebs?

  9. #18
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    I suffer anxiety as well - I am sure my DH just thought "Here we go again".

    He is one of twins, so I could se clearly that one was picking things up and that the other wasn't. I wasn't too worried around the 11 month mark to be honest - I had another child as well, so I knew that some were quick to pick up things and others not so much.

    By 18 months I was starting to worry, I knew something was up but didn't know what. My other twin and he were so different, and because he isn't "classic Autism", that is where the problems with diagnosis occurred. He still enjoys peoples (adult's) company - he smiles when he sees them, talks to them (babbling and made up words), he is happy to see them. So every doctor and even the paed were like "no way is he on the spectrum".

    Some of the things I started noticing around 18 months. He would never wear his shoes, there could be thick frost outside and he would take his shoes off and then freak out when his feet touched grass.

    He wouldn't touch anything like sand, dirt, yogurt, slimey fruit, jelly etc. If he got those things on his hands he would have a total meltdown about it.

    He wasn't picking up words like his brother - by 2 and half he could only say a few words and not pronounce them clearly - like "mummum" "dada" etc.

    He can't hold eye contact, he can for a second sometimes two - but he has to then look away.

    He only likes eating food that is beige, white, yellow, dry, crunchy. Bikkies, museli bars, crackers, toast, milk. He eats no meat and no veg.

    He used to make me hold him tight and hug him really hard. I used to think that it was because he loved me and wanted a connection etc - but no, it is because he has lots of different sensory processing disorders and seeks hard firm touch, but on the other hand hates being touched around his face and head, so kisses, hair brushing, face washing freak him out.

    No sense of danger, he'd climb fences and launch himself off, he would run off and launch himself in front of cars and the blood curdling scream of a mother about to lose a child would not make him even turn his head. We had so many close calls - he is far better now, (after tonnes of Early intervention and therapy) for about 18 months I was so anxious, waiting for the day that he would have an accident.

    They are the main things, there are others - like supermarkets, doesn't matter when we go or what is there - they always send him into a meltdown. Things like that.

    Don't freak out, it will be upsetting if your LO does end up getting a diagnosis. But I can honestly say - a year in with DS2, I cannot imagine him any other way - and even if I could change everything - I am not sure I would.

  10. #19
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    Thanks beebs! What did you notice at a year old?

  11. #20
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    In retrospect I can notice things, like it was hard to get him to smile. I have photos of the twins and DS3 would always be cooing and giggling and blowing bubbles, but DS2 never smiled. He was always terrible with food and always had gut issues.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mumma2503 View Post
    Thanks beebs! What did you notice at a year old?


 

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