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    Question Does lack of babbling and gestures always mean an ASD?

    My son is 11.5 months old and although he has babbled by saying "bababa" "dadadada" "gagaga" but he doesn't babble. Most of the day he says "ahhhhs" and "ohhhhhs". It's been awhile since I've heard babbles: so he's nowhere near saying his first word. He doesn't really gesture but reaches and shares food by pretending to put food in my mouth. He doesn't wave/point or follow my point but everything I've read says he should be gesturing by now. He smiles when I smile but doesn't copy my facial expressions. He does understand simple words such as "bye, dada, bottle". He consistently responds to his name. I really am worried but I won't see the paediatrician until September. Everything I read just seems to point to autism!

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    I would think most 11.5 month olds do exactly as yours does. My 13 month old sounds similar & I haven't even considered ASD. Has someone said something to make you concerned?

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    How is he with other people? Fine? Happy? Afraid? Do you have any reason to believe he has any sensory problems? I think there needs to be collective strong set of delays and aversions for it to be pinpointed this early.

    Most developmental paeds unless the case is very severe, wont really consider assessment before the age of 2.

    Unless there was some behaviours totally out of the norm i wouldnt be too worried just yet.

    Goodluck with your appointment

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    Does he make eye contact? Does he like/enjoy touch?
    Does he engage with you or just play around you?
    Does he hurt himself? What are his reactions to pain?
    Does he have a routine? If so, does he thrive more when the routine is followed closely?


    Basing your fears on babbles and gestures, while valid, is very premature!
    Also, please remember that most doctors won't start looking to diagnose till 18months (at the earliest! A lot we've spoken too lately want our youngest to be 2-2.5 before they start to look into aspergers/autism, even though we've known she was on the spectrum since birth).

    But if you are truly worried. Look into ways to teach him these things in an age appropriate manner.There are numerous websites and apps that are designed to teach children how to do these things, or to teach the parent how to work with their child to help them adapt.

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    I just sent a long reply and not sure where it went.
    He does make eye contact but not up close. Avoids it up close. Doesn't particularly like touch or cuddles but likes being picked up(he's attached to my legs). He engages with us but doesn't pplay with any toys at all. Just relies on us for entertainment. He doesn't hurt himself and crisis when he's hurt. In fact he is quite cautious. He does have a routine and prefers to stick to it but doesn't freak out if it's different.
    I have had a feeling from birth. He was always very sensitive to noise which has improved but he hears everything! Even things going on outside. He has just started initiated peek a boo by ducking down behind the lounge and then popping up when his name is called. He has initiated this himself.

    How did you know your little one was?

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    He's very shy and scared of other ppeople that he doesn't know.

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    As pp have said they won't test for ASD till later. All babies develop and reach milestones at their own pace.

    I'm constantly worried about my DS as I work in the autism field and its in my family, I'm surrounded by autism.

    I understand the stress. Being scared of loud noises is not a bad thing, shows they are aware of their surroundings. Which is a good thing. I really don't have any advice, just wish you luck. Enjoy your baby!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mumma2503 View Post
    I just sent a long reply and not sure where it went.
    He does make eye contact but not up close. Avoids it up close. Doesn't particularly like touch or cuddles but likes being picked up(he's attached to my legs). He engages with us but doesn't pplay with any toys at all. Just relies on us for entertainment. He doesn't hurt himself and crisis when he's hurt. In fact he is quite cautious. He does have a routine and prefers to stick to it but doesn't freak out if it's different.
    I have had a feeling from birth. He was always very sensitive to noise which has improved but he hears everything! Even things going on outside. He has just started initiated peek a boo by ducking down behind the lounge and then popping up when his name is called. He has initiated this himself.

    How did you know your little one was?
    Honestly, these things may be things where you look back one day and realise that was the moments where he displayed something. Or you may look back and realise that the moments where he was showing his AS-ness were completely different ones. (*if* he ends up having it! Remember that every person has some traits :P )

    So first piece of advice...if you spend your time stressing, you will lose out on time you could be enjoying him! (not to sound patronising! Sorry if i do.)

    We don't have a diagnosis for lil miss. But she refused to make eye contact from birth, and had a very weak latch from birth (alot of children on the spectrum have weaker core muscles, and breastfeed as efficiently as they should).
    From a very young age she wanted to sleep alone. She would push away from whoever was holding her, especially if they got their face too close to her, and generally seemed happier if she was left to her own devices a lot. Although she has changed with time. She loves cuddles, provided they're on her terms. She loves to be in a baby carrier, but she prefers to be on my back. And our middle child is amazingly social, and seems to be slowly teaching her how to act appropriately in social situations.
    Not that these are all things that ALL spectrum children do. But there was definite autism spectrum in the family anyway, and our oldest has sensory processing disorder and suspected aspergers.

    I don't care. I'm on the spectrum, and i think we make the world a better place ;-)

    Quote Originally Posted by Mumma2503 View Post
    He's very shy and scared of other ppeople that he doesn't know.
    As far as autism (rather than the spectrum disorders) goes, this is quite a good thing. Being scared of people means he understands that he is a seperate entity (and this is around the age that babies usually realise that anyway). Children with classic autism usually aren't aware of their separateness.
    Last edited by Gandalf; 08-08-2013 at 22:06.

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    My ds was a late talker and I remember worrying over his lack of speech and that he may be autistic (especially as he also used to break down if anything deviated from his routine and he also used to line absolutley everything up).
    When he finally did start speaking, it was amazing. He was pretty much talking in whole sentences straight away and had bypassed the whole babbling baby stage. His 4 now and hit all of his other milestones fine (still likes routine and lining things up though )

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    Is lining up things an autism trait? I notice my son doing this a bit he lines up some of his toys abd his little cars.

    Sent from my GT-N7105T using The Bub Hub mobile app


 

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