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  1. #1
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    Default Autism and early intervention programs.

    What exactly are you and your child meant to get from early intervention? I'm a bit lost when it comes to it all. My DS sees an OT who doesn't do a great deal (might make him do an obstacle course and write out a few letters for 45mins/fn). His psychologist only sees me to talk about issues. She seems fixated on things that don't overly concern me and addressing these "issues".

    Should we be getting more out of it all or is this pretty standard? I remember when i was speaking to aspect when the funding was being set up, the lady i spoke to constantly reiterated the fact that we did not need to keep on seeing the same services provider. I did ponder if that was a not so subtle hint that a different provider would be better?

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    It depends on where your child has the most need I guess. My son has HFA and had two years of early intervention therapy prior to starting school which was made up of regular speech therapy (he was severely delayed and needed to 'catch up'), OT (he has Motor Dyspraxia as well) and social skill building sessions.

    The programs were very specific and tailored to his particular needs. They were highly successful and I believe he would not have been able to attend a main****** school, as he does now, without having these interventions.

    If you aren't happy with the service provider you have now, I would definitely look around.

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    HarvestMoon  (26-07-2013)

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    How old is your DD? My DS is almost 4, an everyone agrees he is too young for a psychologist - I had an appointment once, to get tips and tricks on how to deal with him with meltdowns, fixations etc.

    Otherwise we go to Early Intervention which is where he has a key worker, for the first part they focus on gross motor skills, so basically playing, but with "big" toys. She tries to get him to focus on one task at a time and to take turns (which is taking a really long time to get him to grasp). Then they move into the fine motor skills room, where they do art and craft, and play in the "kitchen", play with rice and sands and other textures that he doesn't like, then they have a story and song.

    With OT, DS has lots of SPDs which affect his life, so they do things like the texture games, hiding "gems" in gooey stuff and letting him try and find it, he is getting better all the time. In the beginning he wouldn't even touch sand, now he plays with goo (as long as it isn't too gooey) and lentils, rice and sand. That was all unheard of a year ago. Then she does some "rough" play with him, because my DS seeks that feeling. So they can do it safely in a control environment. When DS seeks that feeling himself he jumps off furniture and purposely crashes into kids - not that he is trying to hurt them, he just loves that feeling.

    I agree with Groovey, if you aren't happy you can always look around for someone else.

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    HarvestMoon  (26-07-2013)

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    I work in Autism intervention and the first thing I do is have the parents go away and list their biggest challenges and what behaviours they find most difficult. Thus differs a lot between parents and obviously the intervention needs to target the needs of the client. Sounds like the psych may be assuming that the behaviours she is addressing are problems for you without consultation. Could you bring a list of issues to target at the next session?

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    HarvestMoon  (26-07-2013)

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    My Ds is 6 next week. Is it possible he doesn't really need therapy? I just don't know if there is any gain from what we are doing.
    I've been told he has oral sensory issues as he licks, sucks and puts all sorts of random stuff in his mouth and has tactile sensory issues to an extent. As he hates any sort of loose clothing or shoes and can't stand drawstrings and the likes on clothing. He has no issues touching different textures or anything though.
    He has low muscle tone ( the OT said it's not too bad though) and poor coordination and motor skills.

    I think the only major issues are separation anxiety. As he never wants to be left, ever! And just behaviour in general as he is prone to meltdowns. How are these issue usually addressed?

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    I guess with meltdowns it can be about teaching him strategies to help regulate his emotions at these times. Ands I with with you to anticipate meltdowns and try to prevent them (or at least their intensity) where possible. Separation anxiety could be treated slowly with grades exposure which is a step by step plan to build his confidence in being without you.

    He may not need therapy. It's up to your of course

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    HarvestMoon  (27-07-2013)

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    Thanks. I'm still as lost and confused as ever. Do you think it sounds like he needs therapy?

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using The Bub Hub mobile app

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    [QUOTE=HarvestMoon;7363252]Thanks. I'm still as lost and confused as ever. Do you think it sounds like he needs therapy?

    Is he verbal?

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    Our OT gives us calming strategies for sensory related meltdowns. And stuff for fine and gross motor. We do speech and also attend an early
    Intervention preschool.

    I think perhaps you should be asking your OT for strategies surrounding the oral sensory stuff. My ds has oral fixations too and for me it worries me that he will be a teenager doing the things he does now which will isolate him from his peers.

    Can u try see a different OT? They should be giving you ideas to implement at home and school.

    Imo children on the spectrum do need intervention. Ive seen a child who never had any, compared to children who have and theres a huge difference.


    Braiiiiins

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    [QUOTE=DaenerysT;7363367]
    Quote Originally Posted by HarvestMoon View Post
    Thanks. I'm still as lost and confused as ever. Do you think it sounds like he needs therapy?

    Is he verbal?
    Yes. There are no issues in that respect.

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