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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atropos View Post
    .
    People subject themselves to unnecessary procedures all the time. What if routine liposuction went wrong and caused a paralysis of some kind- would you deny that person assistance too?
    Not sure, I would probably approve assistance in that case. There's a big difference between someone having lipo and accidentally becoming paralysed and someone chopping their limbs off and ending up in a wheelchair. Ones an unintentional accident, the other is intentional probability.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    I'm sorry I just find the idea that the taxpayer should fund surgery to unecessarily remove a limb to be absurd. And to then give the person allowances for being without a limb doubly absurd.

    I'm not saying the sufferer has it easy, I'm sure they don't. Pay for their counselling, and mental health disability allowance yes. Pay for their surgery and then physical disability allowance ... No.

    At some point economics and common sense have to work in conjunction with the bleeding heart otherwise the country would go broke.
    You don't consider someone who has a mental illness that makes them think their own limb is not their own limb, but a forgoing limb that follows them around disabled enough to qualify for a pension, regardless of amputation status? In Australia, the disability support pension is for those with physical, intellectual and psychiatric disability. There isn't a separate one for each disability type.
    I would imagine the surgery would be elective so not publicly funded too. Chances are they'd already be on the DSP before any ops- I don't imagine you'd be able to work effectively with this condition. And it's so rare- there'd be very few sufferers entitled to your tax dollars

  3. #33
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    I think hell may have frozen over. Oo I kind of understand where VP is coming from. Scary.

    I don't think I agree with it, but that's because I don't know much about the disorder. But if it were to be likened to a man becoming a woman or vice versa, I expect that the disability would be before the surgery not after.

    So, to write things more coherently. The woman feels wrong with having legs. Understandably she would have some deep and ongoing mental issuea as a result of her genuinely not thinking she's supposed to have legs so would naturally be on a disability pension. But if she feels wrong with legs (unlike people in wheelchairs who have no choice) then wouldn't taking them not be a disability for her exactly but more restoring her to her right state of existance, so giving her a disability pension for something she doesn't see as a disability would be kind of odd. Though I assume she'd still need ongoing paychiatric care to deal with any left over feelings and issues from when she had legs so she'd be on it for a mental disability and not the physical one?

    I don't think that makes much sense.

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  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennaisme View Post
    I think hell may have frozen over. Oo I kind of understand where VP is coming from. Scary.

    I don't think I agree with it, but that's because I don't know much about the disorder. But if it were to be likened to a man becoming a woman or vice versa, I expect that the disability would be before the surgery not after.

    So, to write things more coherently. The woman feels wrong with having legs. Understandably she would have some deep and ongoing mental issuea as a result of her genuinely not thinking she's supposed to have legs so would naturally be on a disability pension. But if she feels wrong with legs (unlike people in wheelchairs who have no choice) then wouldn't taking them not be a disability for her exactly but more restoring her to her right state of existance, so giving her a disability pension for something she doesn't see as a disability would be kind of odd. Though I assume she'd still need ongoing paychiatric care to deal with any left over feelings and issues from when she had legs so she'd be on it for a mental disability and not the physical one?

    I don't think that makes much sense.

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    She'd still need a wheelchair, a parking permit etc. and her mental illness wouldn't cease to exist. The amputation wouldn't be a cure but part of her therapy I guess. It's it that sufferers see amputees as not disabled- the see their own limb or limbs as not belonging on their own bodies- this isn't projected onto others, just themselves. Its fascinating, but I imagine it would be awful to live with,

  5. #35
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    Zombie_eyes is offline Formerly Diamondeyes
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    The whole thing baffles me.

    Thats some heavy sh!t


    Braiiiiins
    *60kilos lost*

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  7. #36
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    For anyone interested in this kind of stuff I highly recommend these books

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    Quote Originally Posted by Atropos View Post
    She'd still need a wheelchair, a parking permit etc. and her mental illness wouldn't cease to exist. The amputation wouldn't be a cure but part of her therapy I guess. It's it that sufferers see amputees as not disabled- the see their own limb or limbs as not belonging on their own bodies- this isn't projected onto others, just themselves. Its fascinating, but I imagine it would be awful to live with,
    Nope. To sum up I dont think I made sense. Cause you just kinda said everything I was trying to. I think. (I shouldnt discuss these things when Im tired. Ill try again tomorrow.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Atropos View Post
    She'd still need a wheelchair, a parking permit etc. and her mental illness wouldn't cease to exist. The amputation wouldn't be a cure but part of her therapy I guess. It's it that sufferers see amputees as not disabled- the see their own limb or limbs as not belonging on their own bodies- this isn't projected onto others, just themselves. Its fascinating, but I imagine it would be awful to live with,
    If I was PM the wheelchair wouldn't be publicly funded and she wouldn't be entitled to a parking permit. Counseling yes, most other things no.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sweetsugardumplin' View Post
    On another tangent, I find it kinda interesting that people's responses reflect attitudes towards people who are differently abled.

    I mean, being in a wheelchair is many people's way of life - so when we are horrified that someone chooses this as a way of life, that suggests a whole range of stuff about people who use wheelchairs and their life.
    Differently abled or disabled? It's not offensive to use the actual term, 'disabled' if this is what you are referring to. People who are ''differently abled" means of different abilities and that does not mean they are necessary disabled. You say a whole range. That sounds ominous. What sort of stuff might that be? I find life in a wheelchair horrific. And I don't think there is anything wrong or disrespectful about saying that. You'll find that other wheelchair users find it horrific too. Doesn't mean that they don't get on with it and it also doesn't mean I discriminate against wheelchair users nor disrespect them. True, in the case of the woman who is the subject of this thread, I cannot imagine why anyone would want to spend their life in a wheelchair but at the same time that doesn't mean I am going to deny her treatment for her affliction either. I feel that in all cases such as this, education and understanding is key. To the poster that mentioned saggy boobs and a boob job would make them feel better? It happens I know two people who have had funded boob jobs for psychological reasons and I am aware that it happens in certain industries frequently such as the ADF and public service. And until recently, you could get $5K worth of dentistry work done on a mental health plan which didn't involve any testing. You just had to convince your GP that you would psychologically benefit and away you went. Likewise, surgeries that are conducted for reasons that are deemed necessary which includes for reasons of mental illness are publicly funded and while it is more difficult now to obtain a DSP (assuming that this woman wants one - hugely speculative to assume that she does) there are set criteria and exams that need to be performed before such a grant is made. To those who would begrudge a sufferer treatment, consider too that such treatment can be cost preventative in that if definitive treatment that would allow the patient to recover is not carried out then future costs in maintaining their illness would end up costing more than the initial treatment itself.

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  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    If I was PM the wheelchair wouldn't be publicly funded and she wouldn't be entitled to a parking permit. Counseling yes, most other things no.
    You just lost my vote


 

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