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  1. #1
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    Default Ds 17 months and not talking

    No words at all, not even "no" or "da".
    He understands some instructions "drink your water", will clap hands,high five, pick up phone and place near ear. He loves cuddles and laughs at his brother.
    He will dance and say "la la"
    But that's it.
    Should I be concerned?
    I'm actually not, but my mum is.

    Ds1 was saying HEAPS of words by now.

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    Chippa  (11-07-2013)

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    All kids will develop speech differently, so I would just let it go for a few months, bu if he isnt saying any words in 3 months I would take him to be assessed.

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    My DS was quite delayed with speaking.

    He showed a lot of other signs of intelligence, but just didn't seem interested in verbally communicating.

    It wasn't until after he turned 2 that he really started to take off and started busting out with numerous words, all said really clearly.

    I understand your concern as I've been in your position, but I suggest you give him more time and see where he is at when he is two. If he isn't where he should be by that age, you'll be able to look into speech therapy.

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    In my experience, nah you shouldn't worry, but your Mum probably will anyway.

    I have an 17.5 month old who says Mum, but that's it. I think he said Dad a few months ago, but doesn't anymore, and he might have said 'duck' the other day.

    My 3 year old spoke at a similar pace. We have had a few speech assessments, after listening to my Mum getting antsy, but the speechy is happy that she is within the normal range.

    I am not going to worry at all this time, cos i know he will get there in his time.

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    take him to be assessed today if possible. therapy needs to be utilised as soon as possible

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    Thanks for starting this thread OP! I have a 17 month old who says Mum, Dad, Nan and more. Oh and occasionally will say poo. I've been stressing about him as well because my DS1 was speaking in sentences by this age. I think it has to do with him being dominated by his older brother who literally speaks for him. I'll be interested to read replies and I'm not stressing too much just yet!

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    Quote Originally Posted by tastychicken View Post
    take him to be assessed today if possible. therapy needs to be utilised as soon as possible
    Today if possible? For a 17 month old?

    That's drastic and a tad alarmist IMO.

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    I wouldn't be to alarmed.

    Ds2 took his time, as did my younger brother.

    Just with ds2 and my brother, my personal opinion is sometimes if there is an older sibling the younger one can stay 'quiet' as the older one will talk for them. Obviously this has no scientific backing, just something I've noticed

    Sent from my GT-I9100T using The Bub Hub mobile app

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    Quote Originally Posted by Degrassi View Post
    My DS was quite delayed with speaking.

    He showed a lot of other signs of intelligence, but just didn't seem interested in verbally communicating.

    It wasn't until after he turned 2 that he really started to take off and started busting out with numerous words, all said really clearly.

    I understand your concern as I've been in your position, but I suggest you give him more time and see where he is at when he is two. If he isn't where he should be by that age, you'll be able to look into speech therapy.
    Thank you, This has put my mind at ease! Ds (22 months) is exactly the same, he's really smart but doesn't show too much interest in talking. He understands what we say and can follow most instructions we give him. I know he knows how to talk he just doesn't show much interest in doing so. He can say lots of words and is vocal in random babble...I was worried but I think I might leave it a little bit longer before I see somebody about it

    Sent from my GT-I9100 using The Bub Hub mobile app

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    My girlfriends son wasn't talking at 20 months ( literally no words) but understood everything we said - his Dr said to wait until he turned 2 and then if he wasn't speaking he would refer him to specialists etc but at 22 months he just started talking!


 

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