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  1. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~Bec~ View Post
    I'm talking about if they want to go out in public with the dress up on.
    But what is so shameful that you would want to hide it at home, what is that teaching a child about themselves?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hootenanny View Post
    But what is so shameful that you would want to hide it at home, what is that teaching a child about themselves?
    I don't think it's shameful at all, I'm asking those that have said they would not take their son out in 'girlie' clothes/dress ups if they would feel the same if it were their daughter wearing 'boy' clothes/dress ups.

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    My son can wear what he wants at home. He hasn't asked to wear them out yet. But thinking about it more I don't think I'd stop him.
    Last edited by ~BEXTER~; 22-06-2013 at 10:22.

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    If one of my sons wanted to wear a dress out, I don't know. In a perfect world I wouldn't even have to care. We have dress ups and one of my sons went to a party with fairy wings and a tutu. And my DS 4 got twin babies for his birthday with a pram and he dresses them and takes care of them. But, if one of them wanted to start dressing as a girl. I believe I would find it difficult. I think I would find it more difficult if it wasn't the result of transgender. If my child was transgender, I would do anything in my power to make them feel comfortable in their own skin. If my child just liked dresses sometimes, would I send him to the park in a dress and most likely be ridiculed for it, if it wasn't that big a deal to his life? I don't know.

    Tough questions.

    They play "dress ups" all the time, and I have no issue with that at all. I just don't know how I'd go if they actually wanted to wear dresses etc just because they wanted to. I know I am not making much sense.

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  6. #95
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    If one of my kids wanted to, id not have a problem with it. If I did id have a lot of people to answer to and a lot of questions to be asking myself. And a lot of questions I imagine id have to answer to my kids as well.

    But, in saying that, I have a lot of trans gender, gender fluid and cross dressing friends so its a pretty big non issue for me. Though I do get jealous they look better in heels than I do. Sigh.

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using The Bub Hub mobile app

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    I only have girls, so no boys. I had no problems dressing my girls in boy clothes. I had a gorgeous little sailor suit I used to put on DD5 when she was a bub. When the teenagers started high school and objected to the skirts in the girls' uniform, I offerred to buy them the boys' uniform instead, but told them they couldn't mix and match, it had to either the full girls uniform or the full boys uniform. (And I would support them with an anti-discrimination claim if the school objected.) However, my girls all didn't want to be the odd one out and opted for the girls uniform instead.

    As for boys, I would tend to be a bit more conforming with society. If my hypothetical son wanted a dress, I would try and encourage a kilt instead. (If was insistent, I wouldn't deny him, but just encourage the politically correct alternative first.)

    As for generic clothes, such as pink and purple tshirts, even though they are marketed as "girl" clothing, I see them as gender non-specific and would have no objections to a boy choosing them. Even if they were blazened with feminine characters (like Tinkerbell or Dora the Explorer), still no problems. (I know some adult men that have bought shirts for themselves from female-only stores (eg Katies) because they fit well. Occasionally someone would point out they were wearing womens clothes because the buttons did up the wrong way, but they didn't care.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ProudMumma34 View Post
    How would you expect a young boy who says has a free dress day at school in primary school who actually turns up to school in a dress?? What would you think would happen in this instance?
    DD1 was most distressed in year 2 when the youngsters at school had to come dressed as a book character - as she came as Tom Baker Dr Who. Her best friend objected "You came as a boy!" and refused to talk to her at all for two years. After that they did talk, but the relationship was strained. Then after not seeing eachother for several years, they crossed paths again at 19yo. The former best friend was acting like they were long lost friends, introducing DD1 to the people she was with. Meanwhile DD1 was thinking, "You were mean to me when I was little."

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    I only have a daughter but if dh and I have a son there will be no problems. It is part of dh's culture for men to wear 'skirts' so my kids will know no different.

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    At home, anything goes and if be fine with DS wearing whatever he wanted.

    Outside the home I am happy for him to wear any colour he chooses, I don't care if boys wear pink, purple or whatever.

    ....but I'd draw the line at a dress and wouldn't let him wear one out.

    Why? Because I would hate him to get teased and I wouldn't want us to be stared at or laughed at.

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  13. #100
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    I've glanced through the thread. .. I have a girl so no boys.
    But I also wouldn't let my boy. .. if I had one... dress as a girl.

    Boys and Girls are different. .. and I'm happy and comfortable with teaching my daughter. ..or son if I had one ... that the genders are different and clothes is one way that expresses these differences.

    I am curious though. ..I have actually never been out at the shops or anything and seen a little boy dressed as s girl. .. ever. Those of you who are okay with it. .. do you therefore buy girls clothes for them when they are a baby/toddler and they wear both??? I've never heard of anyone doing that. .. I'm not being rude I just think it's interesting that if it's so many of you day it's okay and acceptable why don't you see more of it when you're out and about?? (Or maybe people do and I can't tell!!)

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