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  1. #1
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    Default Your child's schooling

    Are you the type of parent to get really involved in your child's school life? Like conflicts, what they are learning etc? Or do you pretty much leave it up to the school to look after?

  2. #2
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    I guess it depends.

    I don't get involved in conflicts, learning, teacher issues etc as I feel that she needs to take responsibility for her learning, behaviour and friendships from an early age. I do help with homework and help with class reading when the teacher asks for volunteers though...

    On a more general school level I am very involved. I am on the P&F and the school board, I volunteer in the tuck shop and try to help out in most school activities. I do this to help to make the school a better place, and to improve the school/environment for kids like my DD (eg. The P&F funds a lot of great program's in the school etc.)

    So I guess on an individual level I try to get DD to be responsible for her schooling, but in a wider community level I do get involved to "help" for greater good IYKWIM??

  3. #3
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    A bit of both.

    friends fight - No, unless I think bullying is involved.

    teacher issues - yes. I don't think a child can resolve a big issue a teacher due to power imbalance.

    As for what they are learning - yes I have been consulted on my opinion on things like the sex ed program for the yr8, 10, 12. I am involved in a supportive way to what the teachers are teaching and offer ideas and help out where I can. I have also objected to some things and have gone above the teacher head when I knew what they were teaching was wrong eg teaching kids to spy on others in the toilets when they had a issue with kids messing up the toilets



    I think it important to be involved in the school I am in-trusting with my kids. I also believe i need to have a good relationship with the teachers and staff as I will be there as parent for at least the next 16 years. We been at this school for 8 years so far, we have had our kids with three school so far. You really get a lot more out of it, if you put some effort in.

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    My son is only in prep, and I try to be involved, I ask questions about what they're learning, I do parent helper once a week, I chat with his teacher a few times a week at drop off and pick up.

    Conflicts - I encourage him to try to work it out himself but I am very scared of him being bullied after being bullied myself growing up, so I actively try to encourage him to talk to me about who he plays with on the playground and what goes on etc.

    Last year I was the president of the parent association at his kindy, and whilst I loved being involved it was a bit much for me with everything else we had going on, so I havent stepped up to any big parent roles this year... with an almost 3yr old with SPD and another on the way, it would be stretching myself too thin.

    Sent from my GT-I9305T using The Bub Hub mobile app

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    I prefer to let the school do their thing but having a child on the autism spectrum means a fair bit of interaction has to happen.

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    Ok I think I am trying to control things a bit to much! Maybe I need to take a step back. It's just he can be so misunderstood and I get super defensive.... Sigh.... How to learn to let go!

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    Are you able to explain the situation a bit more OP?

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    I am very involved as I believe his education is a partnership between home and school.

    I make him take responsibility for his learning, but I also support him. I make sure he gets time to do his homework and I check it. I pay attention to what they are learning in class and I support that too. We do spelling together in the car on the way too and from school.

    Friendship wise - i also get involved. I help him build stronger relationships where I can by getting to invite kids he is getting on well with to things. I talk to him about nice ways to interact etc I chat with parents and try an get along well with parents of his friends. When he has issues with people we chat about it but unless it is very serious I leave him to it.

    Teacher wise - if there are issues then i help him sort it. He can not be expected to negotiate with a grown up who hold power over him...he needs an advocate.

  11. #9
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    I am quite involved at school, in terms of P&C, parent helper, commitees etc, and I feel being at the school a lot really allows you to have "inside information" as to what is going on in the school environment.

    At the beginning of each year I try to make a rappot with my childrens teachers so they know who I am and I can get a feeling for them...it makes it easier to approach if I have any concerns. You see some parents who are discussing their child with the teacher every.single.morning and you can tell it can become quite overbearing for the teacher who has 20 other kids and their parents to deal with!

    Fostering independence is quite impotant to me so as a rule I don't get involved in friend squabbles, other than encouraging my kids to talk to me about their day, and I help them think about how to act/react appropriately in any given situation. Obviously I would step in if I thought they weren't able to handle a situation.

    Eduactionally I like to encourage independent learning at home, but do give them a bit of a "push" by providing material other than their homework (as they get very little), and would like them to do about 20 mins each day (age 7 and 9), with me alongside, to encourage good learning habits as they get older. We are quite involved in sport too, so if homework gets missed then so be it.

    To sum up - I mostly leave them to it..but am floating around with my ear on the pulse!!

  12. #10
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    I guess I just feel that his teacher still doesn't know him very well. Everything seems to be "by the book" so to speak when his needs differ from that. As a parent should I sit back and accept it or try to be an advocate for his individual needs? He has a really tough first year of school & I just want to make sure I can do everything I can to make this year better.


 

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