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  1. #41
    Busy-Bee's Avatar
    Busy-Bee is offline Offending people since before Del :D
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kimberleygal1 View Post
    Actually ds1 was like that, he had reflux and was a very hungry baby that did need constant feeding in the early months but it didn't mean he had to be in our bed! He was in our room along with a comfy chair I used a lot. I never fed him in bed and we never risked his life having him sleep in the bed with us. Doing it this way also meant our children learnt to self settle and became good sleepers on their own, we didn't let habits form by having to hold our boys, feed or rock them to sleep every second of the day for them to be content.
    Look, if you don't want to co-sleep then don't. No one's forcing you! It is, however, a valid option for those that find it works for them and do it safely.

    If your baby needed physical contact to sleep and you used a chair then are you saying you slept whilst holding him in the chair? My DD was like this FROM BIRTH. When I held her in bed at hospital I realised how calmer she was when I put a hand on her head. It wasn't a warmth thing either.

    My DF slept on a blow up mattress on the floor of the living room for 2 years. It started when I was about 6 months preg to when DD was ready to sleep in her own bed. Oh and for the record, DF and I are as tight as we have ever been. Whadda ya know, DD was never in danger. In fact she was safer because I got to have some sleep. I defy anyone to have maybe 3 hours of very broken sleep a night for around 12 months, look after a pre-schooler with their own issues and maintain sanity.

    Finally, I would strongly suggest you don't imply that others risk their babies' lives by co-sleeping. It's highly insulting and offensive. How would you feel if it were stated that you risked your baby's life by RIC'ing?

    I'm never quite sure why you enter discussions about co-sleeping given it's something you've never *had* to do to get any sleep or even rest. If you've never done it, how can you have such a strong anti-opinion? DF gets up before me and there's nothing I like more when I wake up to have a snuggle with DD. It's very cute when she grabs my arms, puts it around herself and snuggles into me.

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  3. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kimberleygal1 View Post
    Co sleeping is the risk! The risk of suffocating your child never mind that now they are suggesting SIDS is a risk, whether you believe it or not, co sleeping is not worth doing.
    To you it's not! SIDS also recommend baby sleeping in your room until 12 months. Are you an irresponsible parent then for leaving them on their own from 6 months? They also suggest dummies reduce the risk of SIDS. Are all parents who don't use a dummy irresponsible?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kimberleygal1 View Post
    Actually ds1 was like that, he had reflux and was a very hungry baby that did need constant feeding in the early months but it didn't mean he had to be in our bed! He was in our room along with a comfy chair I used a lot. I never fed him in bed and we never risked his life having him sleep in the bed with us. Doing it this way also meant our children learnt to self settle and became good sleepers on their own, we didn't let habits form by having to hold our boys, feed or rock them to sleep every second of the day for them to be content.
    I happily co-sleep with our 5 month old and I did with DD1 also (DD2 preferred her own space).

    Saying that co-sleepers are endangering their babies lives is highly offensive and actually incorrect. Co-sleepers do so willingly and ensure that they create a safe sleeping environment for their baby.

    We have never had any trouble with bad sleeping habits resulting from co-sleeping. My eldest has her own bed, a bed time, and sleeps through the night. There is nothing wrong with feeding or rocking a baby to sleep if that is what the parent chooses. I actually love the fact that I am able to respond to my babies needs whenever she needs me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kimberleygal1 View Post
    It was 1yr actually
    Apologies, 1 year then. So still half of what is recommended by the WHO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thepouts View Post
    I happily co-sleep with our 5 month old and I did with DD1 also (DD2 preferred her own space).

    Saying that co-sleepers are endangering their babies lives is highly offensive and actually incorrect. Co-sleepers do so willingly and ensure that they create a safe sleeping environment for their baby.

    We have never had any trouble with bad sleeping habits resulting from co-sleeping. My eldest has her own bed, a bed time, and sleeps through the night. There is nothing wrong with feeding or rocking a baby to sleep if that is what the parent chooses. I actually love the fact that I am able to respond to my babies needs whenever she needs me.
    I agree, I love cuddling to sleep, feeding to sleep etc. your post made me think of something I saw on fb- ImageUploadedByThe Bub Hub1369278285.019644.jpg

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    My dad investigates babies deaths for the health minister ... All I will say is I will not co sleep with an infant ..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maybelline View Post
    My dad investigates babies deaths for the health minister ... All I will say is I will not co sleep with an infant ..
    Other factors have to be looked at, other than just sharing a sleep space. Smoking, alcohol, legal and illegal drugs,

    Nobody seems to want to answer the question...why in other cultures where cosleeping is the norm is there less deaths from SIDS?

    http://blog.mosaicmidwifery.com/?p=264

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    Other factors have to be looked at, other than just sharing a sleep space. Smoking, alcohol, legal and illegal drugs,

    Nobody seems to want to answer the question...why in other cultures where cosleeping is the norm is there less deaths from SIDS?

    http://blog.mosaicmidwifery.com/?p=264
    I do t know. It's an interesting correlation though!

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    Before DD was born I said I'd never co-sleep. 6 years on and DD still comes into my bed most nights lol.

    It's a personal risk assessment that is different for everyone. I decided to take the very small risk of co-sleeping over the very large risk of me losing my mind from lack of sleep and posing a risk to my baby myself. *shrug*

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    Quote Originally Posted by Atropos View Post
    Apologies, 1 year then. So still half of what is recommended by the WHO.
    And you have done everything to do with parenting by the book I assume? To me it's not rocket science to realise the dangers of co sleeping. Theres no danger to stopping breastfeeding before the recommended time and some people dont have a choice either i might add. Perhaps if people knew families who have been through the loss of losing a child whilst co sleeping or be in the field of work that investigates the deaths of such they may see where I am coming from.


 

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