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  1. #1
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    Default Please Help, Breastfeeding 1 Handed Advice

    Hi everyone,
    Sorry for the long post but I will give a little background. I'm 19 weeks pregnant with my second, DS is 13 months. I have 1 arm (entire left arm amputated). I struggled feeding DS for several reasons, my milk didn't come in properly on one side (due to nerve damage from surgery), we had latch issues, chronic mastitis (also due to nerve/lymph node damage) but most of all holding DS while feeding. I had to have someone help me position a pillow and even then i was leaning down, neck pain back pain you name it. Unfortunately we ono lasted 4 weeks before we decided he wasn't happy and neither was I. I have always felt a huge amount of guilt and like a failure, I have always lived my life just like everyone else. I want things to be different this time, which is going to take a lot of preparation.
    I have already decided I'm prepared to feed with one side if needed (have been told this is possible but can leave you pretty lop sided but I'd love some help with carriers, what i might be able to use to make feeding independently easier. I've looked at these http://www.koalakin.com which may be good at home while bub is smaller, it looks like switching sides would be easy (hoping i can use both sides) but I need other ideas for proper carriers for while i'm out and about or need to be moving around with DS who will be 18 months when bub comes.
    Are there any sling feeders out there? have you been able to do it one handed (put baby in, position and change sides?) and what type of sling were you using?
    I'm so sorry for the long post, it can be very hard as there aren't really any 1 handed parenting groups or support, just midwives, lactation consultants and occupational therapists all who have two hands and cant offer much practical advise for me I could really use your help!
    Thank you!

  2. #2
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    Wow.... this is something that I've never thought about. Breastfeeding is hard enough with two arms.

    While I can't offer any advice, I did see this site in the internet, which you may be able to request more information.

    http://www.dppi.org.uk/journal/67/resources2.php

    I hope someone else can give some advice!

  3. #3
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    I'm no expert, but the first thing that popped into my head was that perhaps you could feed from one side in the beginning, and express the other side so you don't lose your supply. You could give baby the ebm while out and about if that was easier. Then when your baby gets a bit better at latching themselves you could go to feeding from both sides? The other thing you could do is feed laying down, you can do that almost hands free, just need to position your nipple then off you go.
    The first few weeks are really tricky, but I find that after 6-10 weeks my babies have been able to latch themselves with little assistance.

    Sent from my HTC One SV using The Bub Hub mobile app

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    I know this isn't the same, but I twin fed my twins using a really good feeding pillow. Initially I had the ezy 2 nurse 2 pillow and then I got the twin milkbar pillow. With both of these I could feed completely hands free even when they were very little.

    I think you could still use both breasts to feed too. You have your right arm? I would use a good high pillow like the ones I did, then for the right breast is use a football hold (baby's body tucked under your R arm). Then a normal cradle hold for the left breast, so your R arm can still support baby.

    Initially the latching might be tricky using only the one hand, hopefully someone can help you with that while you get established?


 

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