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  1. #11
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    I've read that baby talk is natural tendency in parents which greatly assists babies to develop comprehension of language, and the high tones and repetition greatly appeal to babies. So you might not like hearing your Mum talk this way, but if your baby does, does it really matter? It sounds like she is loving and indulgent towards your baby, which is wonderful, isn't it?

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by angelini View Post
    It is supposed to be good for them, that's why the Teletubbies was a 'good' show' - apparently helps with development.

    It drives me crazy, too, though! Does she speak Portuguese in baby talk? Have you let her know that he's going to grow up not understanding the real words because they don't sound the same as what she's saying?
    That's one of my main concerns. I mean, my mum and dad are his major exposure to Portuguese (I only speak it when I remember to do it) and she's spouting off gibberish. It's not all the time but once she gets into the groove, it just goes on and on and my inner brain runs off and hides.

    Hopefully my mum will grow out of it!

    Quote Originally Posted by JR03 View Post
    Yeah i've read the same, apparently it's some kind of 'instinct' that women have, it helps babies speech development or something
    See, I remember reading something that said quite the opposite! That babies are quite capable of understanding proper adult language without the baby talk as a stepping stone. Then again it seems that everything about parenting is contradictory.

    Quote Originally Posted by jellybeanicecream View Post
    I've read that baby talk is natural tendency in parents which greatly assists babies to develop comprehension of language, and the high tones and repetition greatly appeal to babies. So you might not like hearing your Mum talk this way, but if your baby does, does it really matter? It sounds like she is loving and indulgent towards your baby, which is wonderful, isn't it?
    Oh, I love my mum and she's great with DS and there are just as many things that she does right as those that drive me nuts. But she is my mum. It's my duty to complain about her, just as it's her duty to annoy me.

    I've just never felt the urge to drop my letters and use baby talk. Sure, I simplify words and have nicknames for bed time and stuff, I often automatically use a higher pitch at times without meaning to, and I blow raspberries and mimic his babbling at him, but I dwaw the line at dwopping my letters and (literally) goo-goo gah-gah-ing when I'm talking to him normally. It just doesn't sound right!

    I have the same reaction to baby talk that I do to bad grammar on social networking sites.
    Last edited by snowqu33n; 13-05-2013 at 12:16.

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  4. #13
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    I remember reading baby talk where you talk with a little bit of a baby accent (if that makes sense) like the characters on baby shows, certainly not things like heady weady that would drive me insane as well, that it can help babies develop language skills earlier because that is how they will talk once they start.

  5. #14
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    There does seem to be a fair bit of research out there on both sides of the argument. Hopefully your baby's getting the best of both worlds...correct speech from you and baby talk from your mum. I can understand it being irritating, though. The "baby waby" stuff I'd find a bit grating, but repetition of key words, exaggersted animation and high tonal inflections don't bother me and I use them with my kids.

    I bite my tongue when my husband skips key words in a sentence with our child, ie "Daddy got car", so I can sympathise!

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    I'm perfectly fine with repetition and babbling and the melodrama that's just instinct when responding to bub's babbling. ("Oh my goodness! You found a LEAF! How wildly exciting!") I'm annoyed by the baby waby stuff, where you butcher the language with cutesy weirdness and, like your husband, bad grammar!

    Personally, when DS is old enough for a phone and Facebook and whatnot, I'll be monitoring his grammar and use of text speak rather than his adolescent shenanigans. He can run a criminal syndicate through social networking as long as he doesn't use text speak.

    Quote Originally Posted by jellybeanicecream View Post
    There does seem to be a fair bit of research out there on both sides of the argument. Hopefully your baby's getting the best of both worlds...correct speech from you and baby talk from your mum. I can understand it being irritating, though. The "baby waby" stuff I'd find a bit grating, but repetition of key words, exaggersted animation and high tonal inflections don't bother me and I use them with my kids.

    I bite my tongue when my husband skips key words in a sentence with our child, ie "Daddy got car", so I can sympathise!

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  8. #16
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    i do not mind baby talk to BABIES it teaches them to talk, the repitition of a sound like "ma ma ma" may eventually get them to say "mama" Same with "da da da" They learn how to make sounds with their mouths that way. Its very important.
    I also think using a second language is a wonderful idea.
    i HATE baby talk to my TODDLER who is delayed with her language. Just because she still babbles like a baby doesnt mean people have to talk to her like a baby. It furiates me.
    I think it just naturally happens with some people when the have been cuddling my 4mth old cooing and da da da go go go-ing then DD who's 2, comes over and asks a babbled question and the adult ignores her question and comments on her "pretty outfit" instead or says something stupid like "Huh? oh? yes? read....book....ok... you go get book and me read" GRRRRRR
    Is it so hard to speak to a toddler normally? "Oh hello DD, would you like me to read this book about Zoo Animals with you?
    Last edited by Little Miss Muffet; 13-05-2013 at 13:03.

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  10. #17
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    Lol I hate it too, it does my head in. I pull people up on it (probably a bit rudely, I tell them I want her learn English not nonsense).

    From what I've read baby talk isn't necessary, but rhymes (and songs too) as well as copying their own sounds back to them is good for language development. Dd is picking things up pretty quickly with no baby talk anyway


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  12. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by wikidwitch View Post

    Personally, when DS is old enough for a phone and Facebook and whatnot, I'll be monitoring his grammar and use of text speak rather than his adolescent shenanigans. He can run a criminal syndicate through social networking as long as he doesn't use text speak.
    I second this!

    I continually accuse my mum of causing DD's language to devolve, as she'll use terms like "cakey" and "shoe shoes" when DD has been speaking in full sentences (using the proper words) for the last 18 months or so.

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  14. #19
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    We've never used baby talk with DD and it annoys me when people do, but I'd never heard that is could be good for their development?

    So I'll try not to get as annoyed when people do it with our next bub haha. But we've always spoken to DD using the proper works for everything and in a normal voice and she's never had any issues, in fact, we can't shut her up ha

  15. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by wikidwitch View Post
    Personally, when DS is old enough for a phone and Facebook and whatnot, I'll be monitoring his grammar and use of text speak rather than his adolescent shenanigans. He can run a criminal syndicate through social networking as long as he doesn't use text speak.
    Haha I love this

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