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  1. #11
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    Hi there. I work in the Communications Centre for the Queensland Ambulance Service. Unfortunately we don't have GPS tracking (like in the movies) however we do have a caller ID system of sorts. Basically when you ring 000 the billing name and address of the phone account appears on a screen in front of us. So if your child rings from your home landline (and that phone's billing address is same as home address), we will know exactly where you are. Tricky bit is when your child rings from a mobile and you're not at home...

  2. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to PeanutsMummy For This Useful Post:

    FearlessLeader  (08-05-2013),Happymum2  (08-05-2013),αληθη  (08-05-2013),Lauzy83  (08-05-2013),MissMuppet  (08-05-2013),Mopoke  (08-05-2013),PeJu's Mum  (09-05-2013),tormyxxx  (08-05-2013)

  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutsMummy View Post
    Hi there. I work in the Communications Centre for the Queensland Ambulance Service. Unfortunately we don't have GPS tracking (like in the movies) however we do have a caller ID system of sorts. Basically when you ring 000 the billing name and address of the phone account appears on a screen in front of us. So if your child rings from your home landline (and that phone's billing address is same as home address), we will know exactly where you are. Tricky bit is when your child rings from a mobile and you're not at home...
    It's the same in NSW. They can track mobiles but its expensive and not commonly done unless it meets certain requirements. Best bet is to get your child to call your DH or another friend/relative. When they are a bit older, triple 0 calls are a good idea (teaching them how, I mean).

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  5. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by FearlessLeader View Post
    Oh that's interesting. So really all they would need is the apartment number?
    No- if your mobile is registered to your apartment, say 10/200 Fearless St, Leaderville, they will often send out police (police are the kind of default if the nature of the emergency isn't clear) to that registered address. But it's not the best method as so often, like 99% of the time, these sorts of calls are pocket dials- so depending on circumstances they may not be top of the list iykwim?

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  7. #14
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    Some 3yo's could manage to ring 000 and they grow up quickly so if you start teaching her now and she needs to use that skill in 6 months time she might be ready then. I watched a youtube clip today about a 5yo ringing 911 in the US - it's very cute - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c93-l...ature=youtu.be

    I think starting with working on your address is important. It's a good skill to teach anyway. Then progress to ringing 000 and talking through what to say. I would guess that I was pretty confident that my ds could ring 000 on his own at just 5 probably. Prior to that he probably would have been ok. Thankfully we haven't had to do the real thing (had to call 000 for my ds twice, but he was the sick one, not the one doing the calling!).

  8. #15
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    Hope all is ok. At school St john ambulance come out and use role play, pretend phones etc to act out what they need to do.

    The most important thing is that they need to be able to answer a series of questions. eg fire, police, ambulance
    whats the emergency
    whats the address

    etc

    The script is good because it prepares them.

    I also talked to my 5/6 year old class (pre-primary) about emergencies vs problems. It is important they understand the difference between the two.

    Good luck

  9. #16
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    I believe all children need to know their parents real names (not mum and dad) their address and basic info like that.

    As young as possible.. Even 3

  10. #17
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    When I was 5 my grandma had a heart attack in front of me. I was never taught to call 000 so I called my mum. I could barely reach the home phone at grandma's house as it's mounted to the wall.

    I called my mum, when mum got their she sent me outside and she called the ambulance herself.

    I'll be teaching my son about mobile phones (we don't have a home phone) and basic info asap as soon as I think he can handle it... Also be teaching him to call daddy first, then grandma then 000. Between the 2 of them (my husband and mum) someone will answer!! (my mum works for the police herself)

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrsR2012 View Post
    I believe all children need to know their parents real names (not mum and dad) their address and basic info like that.

    As young as possible.. Even 3
    Absolutely. DD knows mine, DHs and her own full names and our address. She has known for over a year now. It's very important information any child should learn as young as possible.

  12. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutsMummy View Post
    Hi there. I work in the Communications Centre for the Queensland Ambulance Service. Unfortunately we don't have GPS tracking (like in the movies) however we do have a caller ID system of sorts. Basically when you ring 000 the billing name and address of the phone account appears on a screen in front of us. So if your child rings from your home landline (and that phone's billing address is same as home address), we will know exactly where you are. Tricky bit is when your child rings from a mobile and you're not at home...
    Same as Peanutsmummy, I work in the Victorian centre that takes 000 calls. If you use your home phone we know the billing address, if you hang up or can't provide the address we will usually send An ambulance or ocassionally police for a welfare check anyway. However at this point in time there isn't a GPS/ tracking system in place. If it is possible Make sure your child knows what town they are in and as you're going about your daily errands talk to them about landmarks close by EG shopping centres, train stations, a familiar shop or restaurant even McDonald's etc, which can sometimes make finding you a bit easier if they don't know or are to young to remember street names.

  13. #20
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    It absolutely isn't too young. I taught DD from as young as she could understand me.

    If you're not confident that he'll recognise a zero, you could always put a sticker or something over the 0 so he knows - 3 stars or something.

    I also taught my full name, our address and our phone number. It took time. I brought it up randomly and often, and I would say, "What's our phone number?" to quiz her.

    If he can't remember all of that, your name and your suburb might be helpful.

    I'd also make sure the phone is somewhere he can easily reach, and teach him how to do it on a mobile as well.

    I explained to use it if Mum will not wake up, or Mum starts choking or Mum falls and hurts herself and cannot get up. There were too many variables, so I hoped that covered everything that might happen. Fires and stuff I explained to GET OUTSIDE and go wake the neighbours and ask for their help. I don't know them that well, but I don't think they're psychos who wouldn't help.

    Now she's older, I think she understands that when to call 000 and what to tell them a little better back then, but i kind of needed black-and-white rules for her because she's that kind of kid who needs those clear guidelines.


 

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