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  1. #11
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    Allymumtobe is offline Winner 2012 - Most Optimistic Poster
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    My pregnancy was high risk, I went public and because my baby needed it I had department heads and specialists all for free I cannot fault it.

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    mummtime101  (06-05-2013),Tippytoes  (07-05-2013),wannawannabe  (07-05-2013)

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    Looks like public might be the way to go. All of my history with what has happened is there and my OBPhys so might go down this path. Thanks so much ladies, appreciate your advice so much x

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    Allymumtobe  (07-05-2013),Blossompossumxxxx  (07-05-2013),wannawannabe  (07-05-2013)

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    I guess it also depends on how accessible you need your team to be. I have a private OB but I am booked into both the private hospital and public hospital (with NICU) in case I need it. Perhaps it changes once you are in the public system as a high risk patient but I felt like a bit of a number at the Early Pregnancy Assessment Unit when I had complications and it has been an absolute godsend to be able to have a quick response by email, text or phone from my OB when I have needed to discuss any worries I have had during this pregnancy.

    It has also given me an enormous piece of mind to be able to get in immediately to see him or his midwives when I have had concerns and not wait around for hours at the hospital or for them to call me back. However, my experience of the public system may differ greatly from others.
    Good luck!

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    Tippytoes  (07-05-2013)

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    Thank you starfish

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    I also had bad experience at the Mater EPAU. They are understaffed and the wait is long but I don't think maternity outpatients would be the same. I'm northside so at RBWH now and there is always someone I can phone if needs be. Assuming similar at the Mater.

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  9. #16
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    It depends on why you are high risk and if you're likely to need lots of appointments and tests along the way and maybe hospital stays, etc or if it's just likely to be an issue around the time of delivery. In my first pregnancy I asked the Ob (I went private) for advice on which private hospital to choose and he suggested one over the other as he could get an anaesthestist quicker at that one in the case of emergency. So I went with that private hospital. When my ds stopped breathing a minute after birth I had my Ob there (thank goodness!), but there were no paediatricians in the hospital. Thankfully the paed was only 3 minutes away and rushed in, but in many public hospitals you could easily wait 30 minutes for a Paediatrician (or more). In public they have a lot more Doctors on site in the case of emergency. I'm so glad my ds picked up quickly with treatment from the Ob (and a large number of midwives).

    So, due to my gestational diabetes, and my ds's issues I was 'high' risk in my 2nd pregnancy, but really not very high risk in my book, so I was happy to go back to that same private hospital and it was a pretty uneventful birth 2nd time around. But, to me, someone who is really high risk is better in the public system.

  10. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mim1 View Post
    It depends on why you are high risk and if you're likely to need lots of appointments and tests along the way and maybe hospital stays, etc or if it's just likely to be an issue around the time of delivery. In my first pregnancy I asked the Ob (I went private) for advice on which private hospital to choose and he suggested one over the other as he could get an anaesthestist quicker at that one in the case of emergency. So I went with that private hospital. When my ds stopped breathing a minute after birth I had my Ob there (thank goodness!), but there were no paediatricians in the hospital. Thankfully the paed was only 3 minutes away and rushed in, but in many public hospitals you could easily wait 30 minutes for a Paediatrician (or more). In public they have a lot more Doctors on site in the case of emergency. I'm so glad my ds picked up quickly with treatment from the Ob (and a large number of midwives).

    So, due to my gestational diabetes, and my ds's issues I was 'high' risk in my 2nd pregnancy, but really not very high risk in my book, so I was happy to go back to thatsame private hospital and it was a pretty uneventful birth 2nd time around. But, to me, someone who is really high risk is better in the public system.
    I work at a public hospital and we have paeds there 24 hours a day....... We either get them in the room before the birth if we think there's going to be a problem, or they're next door in the nursery if there's unexpected problems.

    Looked after a private obstetric lady today....... Her doctor wasnt even in the hospital when the baby was born. If there had been problems with the birth like a shouldar dystocia or pph then our public obstetric doctors were right outside the room if i needed them and paeds were down the hall if there was an issue with baby. No idea where the private paed that was supposed to be there was. If we'd been at a private hospital then then there would be no doctors there whatsoever.

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    Thanks for all your help. I have some more to go on and think about

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    Would you have a consistent OB or MW as a public high risk patient? This is one advantage of private, and something I would want to clarify before deciding.

    As PP stated, mater public and private are in the same building, so access to facilities (eg special care for bub if required) is the same.

    I also chose private as I wanted my own room and for DH to be able to stay, as it was my first bub. I had a an Emerg csection, so these aspects proved invaluable to me during my recovery.

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