+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,149
    Thanks
    655
    Thanked
    321
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Child lying about being sick

    So my daughter had a bit of a sore throat Friday last week, she was at the end of it and was well enough to go to school so I sent her. She was carrying on a bit so I told her that if she wasn't well I would go and pick her up. So of course I had to go and pick her up an hour or so after her being at school. She was fine, definitely not sick enough to come home from school but because she had previously had a sore throat I believed her at first.

    Then today she was totally fine this morning, no signs of being sick at all and I get a call from the school at 10am saying that she's sick and can I come and pick her up. She looked fine when I picked her up and as soon as she got home she wanted to eat (so obviously wasn't that sick!) and I told her she had to rest for the rest of the day, no toys or cartoons etc.
    Anyway I asked her again if she was actually sick and she just admitted to me that she lied to get out of school. She is only 5 and there are no bullying issues or anything of that nature so not entirely sure why she would do it but how do I handle this?? I told her the story about the boy who cried wolf and tried to explain that lying isn't good etc. But I don't know how else to handle this!!

  2. #2
    Busy-Bee's Avatar
    Busy-Bee is offline Offending people since before Del :D
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    11,183
    Thanks
    3,660
    Thanked
    4,704
    Reviews
    2
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Past Moderator - Thank you
    My DS can be a bit of a drama queen and has suggested a couple of times he is too go to school. I've told him that if he's too sick to go to school then he has to stay in bed all day, no TV, no toys and the only thing he can eat is toast. (Basically I've tried to make it sound as boring as possible.)

    I've also told him that if I don't send him to school (other than when he is genuinely ill) then the I will be in trouble with the police (which of course is an extreme exaggeration but there is a little bit of truth in there).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    185
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked
    23
    Reviews
    0
    My mum had a similar issue with me when I was in Grade two. Mum realised that I was saying I was sick on a certain day every week so she spoke with my teacher.

    Turned out that on that day every week they did a reading thing where all the kids sat on the floor and one of the girls used to sit behind me and play with my hair which I hated (scared of getting nits) so to get out of it I would pretend to be sick.

    Once they worked that out the teacher changed how we would all sit and I was fine away from that girl.

    Maybe see if your daughter does the same next Friday and speak to the teacher. It may not be bullying but might be something that she doesn't like doing.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to missf For This Useful Post:

    LoveLivesHere  (03-05-2013)

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    8,705
    Thanks
    581
    Thanked
    647
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Yep- have done had this with DS. It was last year, said he was sick so I said- ok, home today. He had to stay in bed all day with veggies to eat and water to drink. He could read books if he wanted but that was it. He soon got very bored and was happy to go back to school the next day. We haven't had any more "sickies" since.

    I have also done the government thing as well. He complains that he hates going to school and what not and I tell him- well, that's something your going to have to take up with the government because it's law for children to attend schools (I don't go into the homeschool thing).

  6. #5
    Gothel's Avatar
    Gothel is offline Skip the drama, stay with Mama!
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Stressame Street
    Posts
    6,515
    Thanks
    2,368
    Thanked
    2,113
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    I agree make it as boring as possible, maybe even add in some horrible fruit juice as "medicine". We also had the police chat, I said "it's my job as mummy to make sure you go to school every day, and if you miss too many days the police will want to know why". Mind you, dd1 is still 5, I'm sure it gets harder as they get older. I loved staying home as a kid and hooked off a lot of classes as a teen...

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    3,926
    Thanks
    570
    Thanked
    1,116
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    My DS pulled this once on me in Prep, he was adamant he was unwell and as it was the first time he'd ever said it I believed him. Sure enough within a half hour past school start time he had perked right up and drove me nuts. I too did the no fun stuff and had a chat to him about the boy who cried wolf. Turned out a mate of his had pulled the same stunt on his Mum so DS wanted to see if he could (hmm fell for that one!). Hasn't done it since and we still talk to him about the importance of going to school and how booorringg it will be at home if he's sick.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    8,546
    Thanks
    919
    Thanked
    1,250
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    DD rarely gets sick, like pretty much never so when she does she gets some pretty high quality attention and pampering because its so sad for us to see her not her normal bubbly self.

    This means that we have had a couple of occasions where she would lay it on a bit thick & it was pretty easy to figure out why. We simply explained to her that if she felt like she needed some extra attention etc to just let us know , that she doesn't have to pretend to be sick. So every now and again she will have a pyjama day with lots of snuggles and pampering and her mysterious 'illnesses' haven't happened since.

    I would try and figure out what it is she likes about sick days (or what she doesn't like about school) and see if that helps.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    12,957
    Thanks
    590
    Thanked
    867
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    I think I did this a couple of times as a kid too. dd seems to be the opposite, shes has a bit of a cold and the times I've asked her if she feels well enough to go to school and that she can stay home, she refuses. I'll probably have to tie her to the bed to keep her home when she gets too sick to go

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    179
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked
    61
    Reviews
    0
    I have an excellent relationship with my gp, I actually see a husband/wife pair both gps at the same clinic. My daughter has a condition where she produces too much insulin- not diabetes, but she can slip into hypoglycaemia fairly easily if she doesn't eat properly.
    So, at 10 years old, she realised she could take advantage of this. She was giving her breakfast to the dog, then going to school. At school, of course, her blood sugars would drop, she would go this deathly grey colour, for all the world looking like a corpse, and pass out.
    Of course, I would be called immediately, pick her up, the school would have already given her the glucose syrup she needed but I would take her home and she would suit on the couch watching tv for the rest of the day.
    The first few times I didn't clue on- I was in my final year of study and so exhausted and stressed that it didn't occur to me at first what was happening.
    When I realised, I took her to the doctor, and told him exactly what was going on. He wrote a doctors note to be given to the school, reading out loud what he was typing so she knew what it said too. It was some thing like "If (child name) is feeling unwell she is to eat something then return to class. If she passes out, she is to have a glucose drink, lay down for half an hour, and return to class. This can happen up to 4 times a day before her mother is to be called."
    Walking out if the doctors office shes saying, "you won't give that to the school. Your just bluffing."
    so I took her straight to the school, walked up to the office with her by my side, and gave it to them.
    Next day she ate her breakfast. In fact, that was the last time I've been asked to pick her up for her hypoglycaemia. Apparently, after talking to the teacher, she will ask to go eat something occasionally, but other than that she had had no further symptoms at school. Nothing like calling a bluff to help. Of course, that was an older child, when mine were younger, if they came home sick they were allowed nothing but soup to eat, and had to stay in bed all day except for toilet breaks. Nothing quite like being bored to make school look inviting.

    Sent from my GT-I9100 using The Bub Hub mobile app
    Last edited by ARCTICJULZ; 03-05-2013 at 12:19.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Brisbane North
    Posts
    4,460
    Thanks
    1,581
    Thanked
    1,802
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    my dd kept on trying this! in the end soon as I realised she was faking it, I took her straight back!! certainly doesn't try it anymore. lol.


 

Similar Threads

  1. WWYD? childcare, one child sick keep them all home?
    By Madame Mayhem in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 15-04-2013, 09:58
  2. Pre-employment medical and sick child
    By Bellaleggos in forum Working Hubbers - Employed
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 24-03-2013, 18:08
  3. Sick new born, sick mummy!
    By Harliben in forum Breastfeeding Support
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 14-12-2012, 09:09

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Einsteinz Music
Make music at Einsteinz Music in age-appropriate class in Sydney's Inner West, Eastern Suburbs or North Shore. For ages 6 mths - 4 yrs. All music is live! Christmas Gift certificates available for full term or casual classes. Call 0431 338 143
sales & new stuffsee all
Wendys Music School Melbourne
Wondering about Music Lessons? FREE 30 minute ASSESSMENT. Find out if your child is ready! Piano from age 3 years & Guitar, Singing, Drums, Violin from age 5. Lessons available for all ages. 35+ years experience. Structured program.
Use referral 'bubhub' when booking
featured supporter
Baby U & The Wiggles - Toilet Training Products
Toilet training can be a testing time but Baby U is there to assist you and your toddler with the daunting task of toilet training. With a range of products that can be used at home, on holidays or out & about.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!