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  1. #261
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    Buttoneska, Potato cakes, aka potato scallops are called that in Qld because the cut of the potato is meant to be 'scalloped' potato style/shape, but I could be wrong but that's what I've always known it to be why. It doesn't really cause confusion with both the seafood variety as usually in a snack bar you would ask for a potato scallop and scallop for just the molluscs ones.

    *Apparently* it derives from the old english word 'collop' and french word 'escolope'.
    Last edited by Mod-Uniquey; 11-04-2013 at 09:01.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nomsie View Post
    It's a hot dog in batter, deep fried. Yum!! (on a stick)

    Attachment 34795

    We have kebabs here... "I went out Saturday night and ended up walking home with a dirty great big kebab"... where I used to live had a very heavy muslim population, and I swear we had the best kebabs in Australia.. now that we've moved, they're sub-standard.. I'm full of regret

    Everyone says nappies right, they don't say diapers?
    I've never seen one of these in my life! You learn something new every day I guess

  3. #263
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    Those are corn dogs in America aren't they?

  4. #264
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    I always thought napkins were the cloth version and serviettes where the disposable paper type?

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  6. #265
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eko View Post
    I always thought napkins were the cloth version and serviettes where the disposable paper type?
    This was my understanding too.

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    LaDiDah  (11-04-2013)

  8. #266
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ngaiz View Post
    This was my understanding too.
    Okay, I went to the source of everything 100% factual... Wikipedia! Seems there's a difference in use between Australia and England. (U and Non-U relate to 'upper class' and 'aspiring to be upper class'.)


    In the United Kingdom and Canada both terms, serviette and napkin, are used. In the UK, napkins are traditionally U and serviette non-U. In certain places, serviettes are those made of paper whereas napkins are made of cloth.[1] The word serviette in lieu of the term napkin is not typically used in American English, though, as discussed is not unheard of in Canadian English and Canadian French. In Australia, 'serviette' generally refers to the paper variety and 'napkin' refers to the cloth variety.

  9. #267
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    And just because it's interesting - here's some info on class associated language in England.

    U and non-U English usage, with "U" standing for "upper class", and "non-U" representing the aspiring middle classes, was part of the terminology of popular discourse of social dialects (sociolects) in Britain and New England in the 1950s. The debate did not concern itself with the speech of the working classes, who in many instances used the same words as the upper classes. For this reason, the different vocabularies often can appear quite counter-intuitive: the middle classes prefer "fancy" or fashionable words, even neologisms and often euphemisms, in attempts to make themselves sound more refined, while the upper classes in many cases stick to the same plain and traditional words that the working classes also use, as, conscious of their status, they have no need to make themselves sound more refined.

    U Non-U
    Bike or Bicycle Cycle
    Dinner Jacket Dress Suit
    Knave Jack (cards)
    Vegetables Greens
    Ice Ice Cream
    Scent Perfume
    They've a very nice house. They have (got) a lovely home.
    Ill (in bed) Sick (in bed)
    I was sick on the boat. I was ill on the boat.
    Looking-glass Mirror
    Chimneypiece Mantelpiece
    Graveyard Cemetery
    Spectacles Glasses
    False Teeth Dentures
    Die Pass on
    Mad Mental
    Jam Preserve
    Napkin Serviette
    Sofa Settee or Couch
    Lavatory or Loo Toilet
    Rich Wealthy
    What? Pardon?
    Good health Cheers
    Lunch Dinner (for midday meal)
    Pudding Sweet
    Drawing-room Lounge
    Writing-paper Note-paper
    How d'you do? Pleased to meet you
    (School)master, mistress Teacher

  10. #268
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    A lot of the things on that list are twisted in my head... things I thought the upper class would say eg pass on, preserve, dentures etc... blows my mind!

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    Lol no the real upper class don't have to prove themselves with the words they use. It's the pretentious middle (striving to be uppers) class that try to use 'posh' words to make themselves sound better. Really good book called 'watching the English' has a chapter on the uses of language and class etc basically the upper upper and lowest lower have more in common than upper and upper middle

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  13. #270
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    Ahh yes.. it all falls into place now

    hyacinth.jpg

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