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  1. #21
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    But a parenting course *may* help.

    I think it's better to try then just give up.

    I have no experience personally but have heard of 'tough love' parent support groups. Granted they are more a support tool but they do give tips as well. Parents attending this are there due to their kids behavior and trying to find ways to deal with it so maybe it does help to offer services like this.

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    The bottom line is that many of these teens that display anti social behaviours, have them as younger children. I have always argued early intervention is the best policy, when you get in early before the behaviours become ingrained there is a much higher likelihood of success.

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  4. #23
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    This is a tricky one.

    Perhaps they need to look at why and how these youths are committing crime in the first place. Are they out late at night? Are they left home alone at certain hours of the day? If that's the case, why are they out at night or home alone? Because the parents are letting them so if thats the case the responsibility should fall on the parents and counselling for all would be a good start.

    My brother and I grew up to respect our parents. We never got into trouble and committed crimes because we knew right from wrong. Our parents were very involved in our upbringing, we weren't left at home or allowed out at night etc.
    Is this the problem in families these days? Parents aren't strict enough and let their kids walk all over them.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    The bottom line is that many of these teens that display anti social behaviours, have them as younger children. I have always argued early intervention is the best policy, when you get in early before the behaviours become ingrained there is a much higher likelihood of success.
    Very true for a lot of these kids.

    I get parenting courses and the like is a bit of 'shutting the gate after the horse has bolted', but I'd still chase it

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    The bottom line is that many of these teens that display anti social behaviours, have them as younger children. I have always argued early intervention is the best policy, when you get in early before the behaviours become ingrained there is a much higher likelihood of success.
    I wonder if there are stats on this somewhere, would be interesting to see.
    While my brother was no trouble when he was young he went off the rails completely committing crime and ended up in jail, drugs etc after he had left home. Don't know what happened there but never saw it coming.

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    I don't have any on hand, but early intervention generally, has good success rates. The problem is that the govt doesn't want to spend the money. We fought tooth and nail for an early intervention program which we got under the bracks govt, then was taken away bc it was "too expensive to the tax payer". Mind you in the period of only about 3 years we managed to stop dozens of families from losing their kids and becoming involved with the dept, which is extremely expensive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dancingchipmunk View Post
    I don't think the parents should be made financially responsible for the kids in this context. There are many parents out there trying to stop and help their children, why should they also be punished? Like redlips said, youth who commit crime generally don't give two hoots if their parents have to pay, it won't make them stop and think 'oh dear, mum and/or dad will have to pay for this. Better not do it'.

    I'm a big fan of boot camps. I personally think they are great. They should be fully funded, as a lot of parents may not be able to afford it otherwise. My reason for fully funding them? It would save bucket loads of money down the track. If these kids have intervention early they may end up going down a completely different path in life, not in and out of jail which costs way to much and pretty much will continue their life of crime.

    A way of making them responsible for their actions financially could be to garnish their wages/centrelink pay once they turn 18.

    JMO

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    Agree 100% well said ...

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  10. #28
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    Busy-Bee is offline Offending people since before Del :D
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    The concept that someone else can take responsibility for my actions is immoral. The fundamental basis for morality is that people must be held responsible and accountable for their actions. You can offer to serve someone's punishment but you cannot take the responsibility. How is such an idea going to help the delinquent child?

    I grew up with just one of my brother and we had great parents. There were moral, responsible, provided us with enviable experiences, excellent role models, provided discipline etc. I was always a good student and never got into any serious trouble. My brother, however, although exceedingly bright was a terror as a teenager, was expelled from 3 schools, spent time in juvenile jail, bought home by the police on more than one occasion and was even made ward of the state at one point.

    I do like the idea of bootcamps for delinquent teenagers. I think it's a terrific idea actually. Not horrible, nasty places but a place where the teens are required to maintain a very disciplined life through strict routines and behavioural expectations, progress some form of education or trade as well as appropriately demanding physical regime where they can achieve - all run by big-**** army men and women who could beat you at an arm wrestle just using their pinkies.

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  12. #29
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    threechooks is offline If my spelling annoys you that's your problem.... I have better things to do than proofread !
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    I can see the Op's point though. When a juvenile smashes the glass on a council bus shelter, who pays? Not the parent, Not the child... that's right folks the rate payers. Where is the responsibilty. If I end up raising a little Sh**t, I will certainly stand up, own up and claim him as my problem, not societies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by threechooks View Post
    I can see the Op's point though. When a juvenile smashes the glass on a council bus shelter, who pays? Not the parent, Not the child... that's right folks the rate payers. Where is the responsibilty. If I end up raising a little Sh**t, I will certainly stand up, own up and claim him as my problem, not societies.
    I say make the teen get a job to pay for it. The parent didn't smash the window, the teen did. If they don't have a job make them do community service in something wil will save the tax payer money i.e. painting over graffiti, being within a group that fixes playground equipment etc etc.

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