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  1. #31
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    Our kids school puts no effort into it, they also happily tell us all we can be exempt. Apparently 4 in a class might do it?

    I would also like to think the parents of my children's peers wouldn't rely on myschool to decide where their kid will attend school.

    The effectiveness of a school cannot be measured by comparative testing like NAPLAN.

    I don't like comparative testing in general, I want to know where my child needs extra work, but not how they compare to their peers.

  2. #32
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    Just quickly, NAPLAN, myschool etc. Are compared to 'like schools' in regards to many factors such as SES etc. So the school I work at is in a different category to the one 500m down the road due to the changing families we attract.

    I have friends whose families are teachers who do check myschool and while I wouldn't put too much emphasis on the data there- I myself as a teacher wouldn't be sending my child to an extremely 'low' school as these are calculated considering esl numbers etc. However, the school I work at doesn't rate brilliantly and I would send my child to this school any day (we are definitely not low, LOW though)

    A paper test can test many things but the amount of kids I have from other schools come into my class who cannot problem solve, think outside the square, take initiative and create astounds me BUT their bookwork is lovely and they certainly can fill out a work sheet. There is a time and place for both types of learning and as little value I see in worksheets, in the real world I know these kids will need to know how to approach these things from time to time.

    If your child is inclined to, I would give an old NAPLAN test a go. This can really highlight for the teacher which areas to hone in on with the remaining 3 terms she has. It may not be about NAPLAN results but the belief your child is in the -doesn't need to be explicitly taught every little concept so let's see what they DO need group.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renesme View Post
    I would also like to say that some schools don't let their special needs or "low" kids sit the naplan exam while others do. The school that rated the lowest in our area had loads of special needs children of which they asked every single one of them to sit the exam.


    I've also worked at schools which have rubbish teaching methods and the kids are fairly low but rank well in NAPLAN. No idea how they rigged that one.
    I have a friend who swears that for everything in life, there's a Simpson's episode that covers it. This just reminded me of that... I'm pretty sure Bart was asked to not participate in some sort of school-wide exam to see how the school was doing academically.

    Anyway, that's totally off-topic, it just made me think of that.

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  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    I would be annoyed if my child's school taught them how to do the test. What a complete waste of curriculum time, learning how to do multiple choice!
    Just like learning to hold a pencil, write a letter or learning Maths facts. Multiple choice is a skill/format that needs to be taught. Otherwise if they have never seen it before they arent going to know how to answer the questions and I know in year 3 that can lead to lots of tears during the test because they don't know what to do. I've seen a class where this wasn't taught and half the class were crying during the test because the poor kids didn't know what to do. I don't agree with using class time to go through tonnes of past tests but incorporating multiple choice into everyday lessons already being taught is a great idea so they can learn the format. They are going to come across multiple choice for the rest of their life so it's an important skill to learn.

  6. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by lovepink View Post
    Just like learning to hold a pencil, write a letter or learning Maths facts. Multiple choice is a skill/format that needs to be taught. Otherwise if they have never seen it before they arent going to know how to answer the questions and I know in year 3 that can lead to lots of tears during the test because they don't know what to do. I've seen a class where this wasn't taught and half the class were crying during the test because the poor kids didn't know what to do. I don't agree with using class time to go through tonnes of past tests but incorporating multiple choice into everyday lessons already being taught is a great idea so they can learn the format. They are going to come across multiple choice for the rest of their life so it's an important skill to learn.
    Every naplan test has example practice questions of each different type of question on the test that they complete right before starting the test. No need to waste time doing it at other times.

    I've taught year 3 and year 5 several times in my almost 15 years of teaching and never seen children crying because they couldn't colour in a circle.
    Last edited by BigRedV; 21-03-2013 at 11:45.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    Every naplan test has example practice questions of each different type of question on the test that they complete right before starting the test. No need to waste time doing it at other times.

    I've taught year 3 and year 5 several times in my almost 15 years of teaching and never seen children crying because they couldn't colour in a circle.

    it's not about colouring in the circle...it's about knowing that 1 answer is right and the other 3 are wrong and knowing that 1 of them has to be right.

    Like any skill or knew way of approaching something...it helps to be shown and then have a chance to practice. Not all kids can see something for the first time, do it once and then be able to reproduce that throughout the test.

    Not giving them any instruction does help the school though...means they will do worse than they should in year 3 and then show huge improvement in year 5...that is a pretty big agenda so perhaps you should look at what you are doing and think about why...cause it sounds like having poorer than expected year 3 marks might be manipulating things just a little more than you would like to admit!

  8. #37
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    I loathed multiple choice exams in school. I am the sort of person who dwells on answers and often struggle to accept I have made the right choice, particularly where 2 answers both look ok. I used to find them far more stressful than any other sort of exam. I'm a happy camper writing a 1000 word answer, just hated multiple choice.

    If only it was just about colouring in a circle.

  9. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by River Song View Post
    it's not about colouring in the circle...it's about knowing that 1 answer is right and the other 3 are wrong and knowing that 1 of them has to be right.

    Like any skill or knew way of approaching something...it helps to be shown and then have a chance to practice. Not all kids can see something for the first time, do it once and then be able to reproduce that throughout the test.

    Not giving them any instruction does help the school though...means they will do worse than they should in year 3 and then show huge improvement in year 5...that is a pretty big agenda so perhaps you should look at what you are doing and think about why...cause it sounds like having poorer than expected year 3 marks might be manipulating things just a little more than you would like to admit!
    How ridiculous to imply that we have an agenda! At my school, we don't teach to the test. Simple.

    Pretty sure children know that there is only one correct answer.

    Teaching children how to answer multiple choice on a test is not teaching them anything apart from how to answer a multiple choice test. There is no benefit to this at all and it just narrows the curriculum and puts too much emphasis on naplan.

  10. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    How ridiculous to imply that we have an agenda! At my school, we don't teach to the test. Simple.

    Pretty sure children know that there is only one correct answer.

    Teaching children how to answer multiple choice on a test is not teaching them anything apart from how to answer a multiple choice test. There is no benefit to this at all and it just narrows the curriculum and puts too much emphasis on naplan.
    It is no different to teaching them any other skill...quite frankly, by avoiding teaching them a basic skill is just poor policy.

    I don't agree with "teaching to the test" but allowing them to understand it before they have to sit down and do it is disadvantaging them...but advantaging the school because they get to show how much the kids improve from Year 3 to Year 5 and this will be exaggerated because the Year 3 kids have never been given the knowledge on how the tests look. This skews the tests in the schools favour.

    It would take maybe 30 mins - 1 hour to run them through the basics of how the tests look and answer any questions...and, I know that schools spend way more time on way less important stuff.

    I detest when schools run political agendas and by refusing to give the kids a heads up about these tests is political, pure and simple.

    Do the kids at your school get the chance to do te "Australian SChools Competitions"? ...just because these are multiple choice and normally offered from Year 3 - 6 kids. That would give those Year 5 kids sitting naplan som great practice...just a shame the Year 3 kids don't get a bit of practice...but good for the school really!

  11. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by River Song View Post
    It is no different to teaching them any other skill...quite frankly, by avoiding teaching them a basic skill is just poor policy.

    I don't agree with "teaching to the test" but allowing them to understand it before they have to sit down and do it is disadvantaging them...but advantaging the school because they get to show how much the kids improve from Year 3 to Year 5 and this will be exaggerated because the Year 3 kids have never been given the knowledge on how the tests look. This skews the tests in the schools favour.

    It would take maybe 30 mins - 1 hour to run them through the basics of how the tests look and answer any questions...and, I know that schools spend way more time on way less important stuff.

    I detest when schools run political agendas and by refusing to give the kids a heads up about these tests is political, pure and simple.

    Do the kids at your school get the chance to do te "Australian SChools Competitions"? ...just because these are multiple choice and normally offered from Year 3 - 6 kids. That would give those Year 5 kids sitting naplan som great practice...just a shame the Year 3 kids don't get a bit of practice...but good for the school really!
    They get to do practice questions 5 minutes before the test. I hardly think seeing a test in year 3 for the first time is giving our students an advantage. How laughable that you think we are cheating in some sort of way! Whilst our growth is excellent, (which is a credit to the teachers, not some sort of agenda, lol) our results are still well below average in most areas in year 5.

    We don't do Australian schools competition.


 
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