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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    I'm a teacher, would not recommend basing your decision on my school alone.

    Schools cheat, it narrows the curriculum and personally I would rather find a school that offers a broad curriculum, not one that teaches how to colour in a circle for multiple choice.

    It is for these reasons that I vehemently oppose myschool.
    Totally agree. But it seems like many parents that I have spoken to personally do...
    Last edited by harvs; 20-03-2013 at 12:33.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Renn View Post
    Ugh. Will start by saying that I feel VERY strongly about this.

    NAPLAN is supposed to be, as BlissedOut says, indicative. The whole point is that it gives the school an idea of where their students sit in their abilities/progress, and this can help them to direct their efforts. It can also help with directing funding to the schools most in need.

    I despise the use of NAPLAN tests/results for anything else. The idea that kids should STUDY for them? That a class or school should have their results publicly available? It makes me incredibly angry. Granted, there are positives to having a school's academic results available to the public, but I think they're outweighed by the negatives. Particularly when they're quite simplistic results.

    The main problem I have with NAPLAN testing at the moment is that there is this whole mentality that it's important, that students need to study/practice for it. Some schools/teachers put an enormous amount of time and energy into improving NAPLAN results (specifically, rather than all of the associated skills) and some don't at all. As I see it, that rather defeats the point of the testing. Some schools are going to have better results on the tests because the kids are used to those kinds of questions/situations etc, and others aren't.

    Sorry, that became a bit of a rant... and rather disjointed. Personally, I wouldn't have my child practice for it at all. I'd have them sit the test, but wouldn't encourage them to think that it was in any way a big deal.
    Sorry I haven't read the whole thread because I agree with this entirely.

    I'm really surprised that a teacher would suggest you 'study' for NAPLAN. The idea is ridiculous and goes against the whole point of NAPLAN which is snap shot data and truly more useful for the school and region than individual children.

    The best indication of how children are going at school are parent teacher interviews and school reports, not a test on one given day.

    I wouldn't give it another thought OP.

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    I agree with Big Red V. I despise the my school website and refuse to look at it. My old high school has some of the top results in the state - well of course it does, it's a selective school and if you don't pass the entrance exam you don't get in, so there would be something wrong if the naplan results were bad. The results mean nothing.

    When I'm looking at a school for my children I want to know things like what opportunities will they have, how will the school help my kids reach their potential - if they are falling behind what support is there for them, and if they are ahead what tools do the teachers have to extend them.....what are the school policies on bullying and classroom behaviour, and so on. I can honestly say naplan results wouldn't even come into it (although I was at a parents meeting a few weeks ago and the principal mentioned that the school does do a lot of analysis of their naplan results....it's all for internal purposes though so they can track how individual students are progressing and identify trends or areas where additional resources may be required.....which IMO is exactly how naplan is supposed to be used!)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    I don't have school aged kids yet and know nothing about Naplan but my SIL and I have been looking at schools lately for our kids and we did look at the naplan results on the my school website and it may be coincidence but the schools with the "bad" reputations had lower naplan scores than the ones with the "good" reputations -so if its not a reliable way to check out the schools academic records then how to we check them?
    This is a really good question. NAPLAN data is not a reliable indication of the quality of education at a school. Most people I imagine would look at NAPLAN on my school and compare to other schools - this does not give an indication of how well a school is doing. You need to look at a single school over a period of years to get an indication of improvement or not. There are so many variables which affect NAPLAN data that when you compare schools NAPLAN data, it's like comparing apples and oranges. However, if you compare the same schools data over years then you get an indication of how well that particular school is going because you are comparing like data with like variables etc..

    To get a better idea I would only look at a single school and analyse the data over several years and cohorts of children to see how that school is travelling. I would also triangulate that data with the whole school level report and the 'student gain' graph.

    A school which always gets really good NAPLAN data but doesn't improve on that data is not making real improvements to teaching and learning- schools need to value add to their own individual data to improve.

    Hope this makes sense.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    so if its not a reliable way to check out the schools academic records then how to we check them?
    It tends to be the case that the schools with better reputations will have higher scores. Most of the time though, a school's reputation reputation in the broader community has a lot to do with the socio-economic background of the kids attending. Of course, kids whose parents have lower levels of education are likely to have lower scores. Same is the case for kids whose parents have higher levels of education... their scores are likely to be higher. This means that looking at NAPLAN scores alone tells you something about the students/parents of that school community, but nothing about the school itself. It's only when you start to look at changes over time or comparisons with 'like' schools that you can get an idea of what the school is doing for the students.

    As a teacher myself, I would much rather send my child to a school where there are dramatic improvements over time than one where improvement is fairly standard... even if the overall scores for the former school were lower. Although of course there'd be far more to choosing a school than that.

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    I would also like to say that some schools don't let their special needs or "low" kids sit the naplan exam while others do. The school that rated the lowest in our area had loads of special needs children of which they asked every single one of them to sit the exam.


    I've also worked at schools which have rubbish teaching methods and the kids are fairly low but rank well in NAPLAN. No idea how they rigged that one.

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    I agree re NAPLAN not being reliable. My sister sends her boys to a school which does quite poorly on NAPLAN but she's found it to be excellent. The reason it doesn't do well is they attract quite a few kids with ASD and other issues as they are equipped to handle them and teach them well. But these kids don't always do well on NAPLAN.

    I don't think it's terribly reliable at all.

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    Renesme  (20-03-2013)

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    I can't say that I've ever tried searching for results on DS school for their naplan results. Personally I'm not interested. All I'm interested in is DS and how he is doing.
    My personal opinion is that you don't need a whole lot of funding to teach well (except for attracting good teachers- and I believe good teachers will know this. I taught my son last night how to devide by using lollies that were in the fruit bowl left over from the weekend).

    Curious- do we get the papers back? That's something that I would be most interested in.

    I want DS to do the test. I'm not a teacher and I don't know how to judge whether DS is or isn't struggling with a concept without some form of "test". I don't know how to teach or what to teach when- I'm likely to start off with the difficult concept of grammer when he hasn't even learnt the alphebet! This would be idealy what I would like from the school report- which I don't feel I'm getting. Naplan might be able to provide me with these answers.

    It is not the context I am interested in DS "studying". It is the format. DS has never sat a "test". He doesn't understand multiple choice, how to structure and answer, a story etc etc and I certainly don't like the idea of the teacher spending her time teaching the class that. I think it's something I can teach relatively easily at home. I don't mind teaching him these things as its something that he will use throughout his education. If there was a test that could teach him these things using spiderman- I'd get it, but the Naplan books are the only ones of their kind so them it must be.

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    so much of what we do comes down to 1 test on 1 day...i don't see why that is such an issue. Some kids will have bad days some kids will have good days, it is part of life.

    My feeling is that if the schools and teachers don't make it a huge stressful thing, then the kids will be fine. If information is shared and spoken about freely, then it becomes less of an issue.

    But, as a parent, i hate that we are given such meaningless info on reports....so my kid is performing "on target" for the curriculum...wtf does that mean? Does it mean compared to their class/year they are at the bottom and need assistance or does it mean they are at the top? The curric is an unknown to most parents (not me, I am at uni studying it lol) so this kind of feed back means bugger all.

    Teachers are hamstrung with the comments they are allowed to write...so nothing meaningful comes there either.

    i WANT to know how my kids are doing...at the moment, NAPLAN is at least some indication. I don't want wiffly waffly feel good statements...i want data so I can know how to help and support them.

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    If your child is on target, then they are meeting age expectations. If you are unsure about the report or where your child is at, ask the teacher instead of relying on naplan.

    See, I don't think it's fair to compare your children to others.

    I would rather know my child had made good progress than comparing her to classmates. It doesn't matter if she's better than someone.

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