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  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by GM01 View Post
    Apologies if this is slightly off track, but has anyone had experience with prems being held down due to the corrected age falling within the next school year?

    DD is only 10 months, but our situation will be this: here we have 1 July cut off, her birthday is end of May, so she will be amongst the youngest. However, her due date was early September - and developmentally everything is centred around this, if not slightly delayed further by her difficult start. So if she was born on her due date (or even 8 weeks before!) she should be in the group that starts the following year.

    Would it be expected she start by her correct age? I know a lot of prems don't even use corrected age nearing school age, but for such a micro prem I am told it still may be used if her development reflects it.
    When we tried to delay ds1 we were told that a premature birth was one reason it would be allowed. I didn't look into that as it wasn't our situation but I took it to mean that if ds1 *was* premature and his birthday was before cut off we would have been allowed to delay him starting prep.

    I hope that makes sense. I'm a little tired so my apologies if it's garbled

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    I will have the same problem as my DD is 3 days after cut off. In my experience as a teacher though children just aren't ready. I think the cut off date should be earlier than it is in fact.

    Like so many people here.. usually they may be okay academically but socially they have problems. Sometimes they also struggle academically too though. Some don't.. you have the rare ones that do cope okay/.

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    Someone has to be the youngest and the oldest and the shortest and the tallest and the best at maths and the worst at spelling. The new and rising popularity of holding children back is (in my community) mostly parent-led rather than school-recommended. It increases the age range and associated disparities even more. With the rising popularity of holding back, perhaps eventually everybody will hold their child back. What then? Maybe then we can hold them back for two years to avoid them being the youngest? I have a near-cutoff child who has the additional "disadvantage" of being a boy. I sent him when he was supposed to go, he coped, when problems arose, we dealt with them. He is flourishing. No regrets here. Good luck with your decision.

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  5. #84
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    I sent DS to school when he was due to go. He was 17 days off the cut off and is the third youngest in the year 1's at his school. I really wanted to repeat him but wasnt allowed and they assured me he would get the extra support he needed. I wish i held him back another year before he started prep.

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    Quote Originally Posted by something View Post
    Someone has to be the youngest and the oldest and the shortest and the tallest and the best at maths and the worst at spelling. The new and rising popularity of holding children back is (in my community) mostly parent-led rather than school-recommended. It increases the age range and associated disparities even more. With the rising popularity of holding back, perhaps eventually everybody will hold their child back. What then? Maybe then we can hold them back for two years to avoid them being the youngest? I have a near-cutoff child who has the additional "disadvantage" of being a boy. I sent him when he was supposed to go, he coped, when problems arose, we dealt with them. He is flourishing. No regrets here. Good luck with your decision.
    I don't think it's a rising popularity, with only about 20% of parents holding their children back. It's got nothing to do with me wanting to hold onto my children forever, in fact, I would love to not have to pay $155 a week for my daughter's 2 days in childcare and $76 a week for her 2 days in preschool, but the fact is, she just was not ready to go to school this year, and I'm glad I don't live in Qld because she would have had to go. I think we are lucky in some states to have that choice.

    You could have a whole class of children born in the same month and year, but there would still be a huge range in maturity, behaviour, intelligence, social skills etc.

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  8. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by something View Post
    Someone has to be the youngest and the oldest and the shortest and the tallest and the best at maths and the worst at spelling. The new and rising popularity of holding children back is (in my community) mostly parent-led rather than school-recommended. It increases the age range and associated disparities even more. With the rising popularity of holding back, perhaps eventually everybody will hold their child back. What then? Maybe then we can hold them back for two years to avoid them being the youngest? I have a near-cutoff child who has the additional "disadvantage" of being a boy. I sent him when he was supposed to go, he coped, when problems arose, we dealt with them. He is flourishing. No regrets here. Good luck with your decision.
    That's great your son coped. Mine didnt. We knew he wouldn't, his daycare knew he wouldn't and his teacher in his first prep year realised it too.

    While I'll agree there would be *some* parents who just don't want their child being the youngest this isn't the case for most. I don't think (in my area at least) there is a rise in popularity to keep kids back. It's bl00dy hard to delay starting and to repeat isn't a walk in the park. We were fortunate that ds1 had a teacher who backed us up when requesting to repeat and went to bat for us against the guidance counsellor.

    Please know I'm not trying to attack at you. Just putting it out there that majority of parent try to delay for very valid reasons.

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  9. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by something View Post
    Someone has to be the youngest and the oldest and the shortest and the tallest and the best at maths and the worst at spelling. The new and rising popularity of holding children back is (in my community) mostly parent-led rather than school-recommended. It increases the age range and associated disparities even more. With the rising popularity of holding back, perhaps eventually everybody will hold their child back. What then? Maybe then we can hold them back for two years to avoid them being the youngest? I have a near-cutoff child who has the additional "disadvantage" of being a boy. I sent him when he was supposed to go, he coped, when problems arose, we dealt with them. He is flourishing. No regrets here. Good luck with your decision.
    I would say that the overwhelming majority of comments here are people saying that they wish they'd delayed in hind sight as their child wasn't ready.
    That to me doesn't indicate a popularity of holding children back.

    It indicates that the current system isn't flexible enough for the needs of the children being educated.
    Your son flourished. But by the looks of it he's in the minority. That to me indicates that parents are being pushed into something that's not right for their child, not a school system that 'knows best'.

    My DS is an April bub and will be going to prep next year. We'll be looking at how he's going at the end of the year and if he seems to be struggling I'll have no problems holding him back because it's not about what's popular. It's about what's right for my son's education. They spend 13 years of their life focusing on it, seems to be a pretty good reason to get it right .

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    Quote Originally Posted by something View Post
    Someone has to be the youngest and the oldest and the shortest and the tallest and the best at maths and the worst at spelling. The new and rising popularity of holding children back is (in my community) mostly parent-led rather than school-recommended.
    I disagree with this. Many schools feel the young ones aren't ready, but at least in NSW they are forced to take them if they turn 5 that year.

    I don't think there are any hard and fast rules. But I believe particularly boys (which research has shown have less impulse control and attention span in the early years) cope better being kept back. Of course I'm not saying ALL boys, but some, definitely

    I'm so relieved NSW allows it. My DS turns 6 this year, is in kinder, and academically is flourishing. We've had behavioural issues in regard to the impulse control and attention span though, which is only now, in week 8 starting to improve and it's been immensely stressful for everyone, him included.
    Last edited by delirium; 20-03-2013 at 10:58.

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    My MIL taught Kindergarten in NSW for 30 years and she would always say that it is FAR better to keep them back a year if you are not sure. Espeically boys.

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    My son was due mid July, born late June, and I wish I'd been able to hold on for another 9 days so that I wouldn't be having this difficulty now. He's due to start Prep next year and I hope he's ready, but I'm putting him into speech therapy for a stuttering problem and we will see an OT for an assessment of school readiness when he's 4, and again at the end of the year. I'm laying the groundwork for repetition of prep if it turns out he needs it.


 

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