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  1. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maybelline View Post
    my girl will be 5 end January .. I was going to send her to prep next year .. But now I am not sure if that is wise . She is very bright and social .. Everyone says she will be bored by term 4 at kindy and ready for school .. But I don't want her to be one of the younger ones .. If holding her back means she will have huge advantage over other kids academically and physically etc .. I should maybe wait till she is closer to 6 ..long term could be hugely beneficial for her.
    I would ignore the cr*p that others have said to you about her being bored in kindy, and go with your gut. My DD is very intelligent and we had no problems with having her at home the extra year. We learnt more at home than she would have at school! Zoo trips, museum, read books on dinosaurs etc etc.

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    Maybelline  (20-03-2013)

  3. #72
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    A good school will pick up if your child is bored or finding the work too easy and will put them in an accelerated program or in the least tailor a bit of an individual plan for them

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    Cinderella82  (19-03-2013)

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    A good school will pick up if your child is bored or finding the work too easy and will put them in an accelerated program or in the least tailor a bit of an individual plan for them
    Absolutely. I have made it clear to the school that my daughter skipping a year is not an option. So she does accelerated work whilst staying in year 1.

  6. #74
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    I turned 5 the day school started. I always struggled. My first year I cried everyday, I didn't make friends, I withdrew myself a lot. At home I was the complete opposite and very independent. Mum always regretted not waiting.
    I was always the youngest by a few months. Never had anyone in my grade younger then me.

    I really think it depends on the child though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4underfour View Post
    Absolutely. I have made it clear to the school that my daughter skipping a year is not an option. So she does accelerated work whilst staying in year 1.
    Yep same for my DD She has the best of both worlds, gets to be in a class with those her age, but is in the accelerated programs to keep her brain ticking

  8. #76
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    My now 20 year old sister just met the cut off to start school at 5. My mum didn't hesitate to send her, and has regretted it ever since. My sister was not academially, socially or emotionally ready for it.

    My mum tried several times to have her held back, as she was really struggling, and seemed to just fall further behind every year. But the school/s always refused, saying it would be damaging to her self esteem.

    My sister has suffered her whole from incredibly poor self-image and very low self esteem, all relating to her believing that she is 'dumb'. All of this because she just wasnt ready to start school and the school system would not hold her back.

    It used to break my heart to hear this previously happy and confident little girl come home at 8 years old crying and saying things like "I'm just dumb and useless".

    These have been lifelong effects for her so far, and she still struggles with it. My brother and I both started at 6 and excelled academically, which made it all the harder for my sister as she always compared herself.

    I would definitely think long and hard before sending my 5 year old to school...if they're ready for it, go for it! But if they're not, don't feel like you have to...

  9. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by peanutmonkey View Post
    We looked into it. Most schools in the area south of brisbane wouldny sign off on delayed prep start unless there was a medical or behavioural reason why that could be signed off on by a paed etc. A friend of mine delayed her son who has ASD but we were told if we didnt send DS1 this year then he would go straight into year 1 next year.

    I have several friends who are primary school teachers in the brisbane/gold coast area and they have all confirmed that it is incredibly difficult to hold them back here and most teachers recommend against it.
    This mirrors what I have heard from everyone who has tried to delay their child's entry in the qld state school system. It is so wrong. Yet we were easily able to delay our dd starting school because we are at a private / independent school. In fact they really encouraged a delayed start as they said in general the older a child is when they start the better they will do - not just in primary but in secondary too ( this was a big consideration for me, I decided that as a teenager I would much rather her lead others astray than be lead herself ) . Obviously every child is different, but I believe the research leans towards it won't hurt them to hold them back if they are ready, but it can hurt to send them before they are ready.

    For myself, holding my dd back was the best thing we could have one. Academically she would have been fine but socially she would have been eaten alive. Her first year of kindy she cried every day at drop off for the whole year, was too self conscious to speak up in class and only played with about two other kids because most of the class was nearly a year older than her. The change in her in her second year was amazing. She has coped brilliantly with prep and year 1 and so many parents comment on how confident she is. She's gone from hardly uttering a word to sticking up for other children if she feels someone has been mean to them

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    twotrunks  (23-03-2013)

  11. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by misho View Post
    Me 3..

    Im born on the 29th of June so i was always the youngest.

    I never noticed it being an issue until I did my HSC & 1st year uni and i was such a 'baby' in hindsight. I couldnt think for myself and really struggled to be mature and to make decisions that would impact me/my career for the rest of my life .
    I experienced this as well (I'm the end of may and started school at 4.5 in Victoria before they moved the cutoff to April). The end result for me though was that I couldn't cope with the pressure of making life affecting decisions such as what subjects to take (I was at a very academic girls high school) and I failed year 11 spectacularly. In hindsight it was probably a god thing ( not that my parents thought so!) because I finished year 12 the same age as everyone else and i think I coped much better at uni than I would have done. It was a rocky way to get there though.

  12. #79
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    My DS went to pre-primary (year before year one in WA) this year and he turned 5 in Feb. We've had no issues and no regrets. The PP is compulsory in WA and it can be very hard to hold a child back.

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    Subbing please, my twin girls were premmies, so this is an issue for us.


 

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