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  1. #101
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    My son started prep when he was 5 and it was horrible!!! His maturity level just wasn't where it should be and he struggled terribly. At one point he cried everyday for three months straight. He ended up repeating prep the following year at another school as he didn't progress at all

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by something View Post
    Someone has to be the youngest and the oldest and the shortest and the tallest and the best at maths and the worst at spelling. The new and rising popularity of holding children back is (in my community) mostly parent-led rather than school-recommended. It increases the age range and associated disparities even more. With the rising popularity of holding back, perhaps eventually everybody will hold their child back. What then? Maybe then we can hold them back for two years to avoid them being the youngest? I have a near-cutoff child who has the additional "disadvantage" of being a boy. I sent him when he was supposed to go, he coped, when problems arose, we dealt with them. He is flourishing. No regrets here. Good luck with your decision.
    Yep someone does always have to be the youngest, the most immature, the smallest etc. but frankly, I don't want that to be my kid. I couldn't care less about what other parents do with their kids (although I do feel sorry for the little 4 year olds in full time school).
    However, my reasons were not so much that I didn't want her to be the youngest compared to the other kids, just that I felt she was too young at 4 to be in full time school. So again, I wNted what was best for HER and couldn't care less about the other kids.

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  4. #103
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    So, you think that all along it would have been better to start him in prep at 6? I suppose the other issue is that if we have kids starting grade one, at say 7, that means they have 12 years of schooling, so is it going to be ok to have a person finish school at 19? I don't know about that.

    It definitely does seem to be a problem for many people, but I do wonder if in many cases it's not just the schooling that's the problem. Is it that these children haven't had the best start in life at home (maybe it really isn't in their best interests to be be care from a very young age, because parents are relying on others to know their child better than they do?) I think it's probably a much wider issue, not just that they are starting school too early - there are other things that may have hindered the child's progress along the way, and some just find it convenient to blame the education system? Just throwing it out there...

  5. #104
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    For our son it would have been fantastic to start him in prep at 5.5. He was far more mature and socially ready.

    I can see what you're saying about some kids not having the best start but I can say with full confidence that we did our absolute best with ds1. He did attend daycare two days a week but this was for interaction, not us trying to palm off our responsibilities and expect others to teach him.

    I honestly believe we could not have done more to try and help ds1. He simply was not ready for prep at 4.5.

    Sent from my GT540 using BubHub

  6. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clarabelle View Post
    So, you think that all along it would have been better to start him in prep at 6? I suppose the other issue is that if we have kids starting grade one, at say 7, that means they have 12 years of schooling, so is it going to be ok to have a person finish school at 19? I don't know about that.

    It definitely does seem to be a problem for many people, but I do wonder if in many cases it's not just the schooling that's the problem. Is it that these children haven't had the best start in life at home (maybe it really isn't in their best interests to be be care from a very young age, because parents are relying on others to know their child better than they do?) I think it's probably a much wider issue, not just that they are starting school too early - there are other things that may have hindered the child's progress along the way, and some just find it convenient to blame the education system? Just throwing it out there...
    I think many of the issues are related to behaviour and emotional maturity as opposed to problems with academics. That stuff is often not taught but something that happens naturally and is different for each child. As I said my son turning 6 this year is doing very well academically. It's his social and emotional maturity and ability to have impulse control that is the problem and believe me, we have worked on that before he even went to school.

  7. #106
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    I'd be interested to see more input from any teachers on here.
    I see some parents that have had no problems sending their kids at an earlier age but I also see many who wished they did or could have held back that extra year.
    I must say I'm glad I'm in a state and suburb that recommends deferring and encourages it for most children weather they are clever chickens or not.
    I struggle biting my tongue with mothers who think their child is ready but in my opinion are not. Eg kids who bite, hit, struggle sharing, ignoring authority from another person. A full year does wonders for a young child's maturity and development but many parents think children are ready because they are bored and clever.
    Maturity is far more important than sending a child to school knowing the alphabet , counting to 100, writing their name and reading words in my opinion.

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  9. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clarabelle View Post
    So, you think that all along it would have been better to start him in prep at 6? I suppose the other issue is that if we have kids starting grade one, at say 7, that means they have 12 years of schooling, so is it going to be ok to have a person finish school at 19? I don't know about that.

    It definitely does seem to be a problem for many people, but I do wonder if in many cases it's not just the schooling that's the problem. Is it that these children haven't had the best start in life at home (maybe it really isn't in their best interests to be be care from a very young age, because parents are relying on others to know their child better than they do?) I think it's probably a much wider issue, not just that they are starting school too early - there are other things that may have hindered the child's progress along the way, and some just find it convenient to blame the education system? Just throwing it out there...
    I have to say I find this kind of offensive. Our kids have had brilliant starts in life, and I would argue that two who will start "early" (almost 6) will have the best start of all. They have had a whole extra year to bond with us an with their kinder teachers, to be cared for in small groups , to learn in a totally play based environment... They are lucky, certainly not disadvantaged.

  10. #108
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    My nephew started prep a week before his 5the birthday and my niece 4 weeks after and it would have been an injustice to not let them go. Socially they were ready and intelligently ready for challenges. I really think it comes down to each child and where they are at. Both kids parents asked their lindy teacher if they were ready. Hopefully lindy teachers are being honest.

  11. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by twotrunks View Post
    I have to say I find this kind of offensive. Our kids have had brilliant starts in life, and I would argue that two who will start "early" (almost 6) will have the best start of all. They have had a whole extra year to bond with us an with their kinder teachers, to be cared for in small groups , to learn in a totally play based environment... They are lucky, certainly not disadvantaged.
    I agree I found her comment very offensive!! Truth be told I wish I had all my kids early in the year so I could defer them all!! As it is I'm about to send my son to school next year aged 5 1/2 where I sent my eldest at 6.1 years.

    I don't know why one would assume that deferring a child has to do with how they are brought up!?!
    My eldest had no day Care and was reading, writing and knew nearly all his countries at age 4. His numbers where awful though he just couldn't understand it yet he was just not ready maturity wise. So what does that have to do with how I brought him up at home?
    My second I decided to send him to day Care, it's been the best thing I have done. He is capable, plays so much better with children than my eldest did and is fantastic with numbers , colors and shapes but reading and writing he has no skill in at all.
    What do I prefer , sending a academically capable child who is ready to learn but not mature enough to play , share and listen to another authority figure or sending a child who is socially , emotionally and maturely ready who is able to learn within the school environment?!
    The age difference between the two had I not deferred would have only been 4 months upon starting prep. So really not much different yet I am way more confident sending my second son to school at 5.5 then I was sending my eldest to school at 5.1 simply because he attended day care and learnt alot there he couldn't learn at home.

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