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  1. #1
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    Default Not raising my children vegetarian!

    This isnt an issue yet, but I would like to hear the opinions and experiences of others.

    Im vegetarian. I have been since I was 5 and put two and two together about what I was eating. My non-vegetarian family were amazing and never forced me to eat meat. My reasons are a little different to most. Meat just grosses me out. The idea of consuming dead flesh, i find repulsive. Yet my DH eats meat which I am happy to prepare and watch him eat. Its just the idea of putting it into my body.

    I do believe that a healthy diet can include meat and have introduced my son (10m) to most red meats, chicken and fish. He loves them Although the reason for my diet isnt really ethical (more of a phobia) I still buy free range and ethically farmed products

    Now my question is, what happens when he realises I eat differently? Do I be honest "Well, you know how cows go moo? Well thats what you are eating, dead, cooked cow. Mummy thinks its gross and cant eat it".

    Has anyone had this, or something similar happen? How old will he be before he starts asking questions?

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    Ellewood  (13-03-2013)

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    Im not vegetarian. But our 5 year old knows that the meat he eats is a dead animal. In most cases he's met the animal. And it hasn't been an issue for him so you might find that when he asks he'll just treat it as information.

    Our son knows some family members are vegetarian and some aren't. Its never really been an issue, I guess cos its just every day life.

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    darla87  (13-03-2013),LoveLivesHere  (13-03-2013)

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    If your child asks just say "Mummy has a special diet and can't eat meat." Then explain the reason when the child is old enough to understand.

    If you say that you think it's gross, the child may start uses that as an excuse not to eat their own food.

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    darla87  (13-03-2013)

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    I would just be honest. I don't think lying about where meat comes from would achieve anything.

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    Bubbles10  (13-03-2013),darla87  (13-03-2013),Ellewood  (13-03-2013),LoveLivesHere  (13-03-2013),WineTime  (13-03-2013)

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    Over the years i have been a vegetarian , a vegan ( only for 6 months as it was way too hard!) and am a happy pescatarian now for the last 20 years ( have not eaten birds or mammals for nearly 28 years) I cook organic or free range meat and poultry for my 2 year old DS and will let him decide if he will continue to eat meat or not when he is old enough to understand ( won't cook veal/pork or rabbit - I draw the line at those animals in my house - DH gets his bacon and veal fix at restaurants!)

    All my neices/nephews/friends kids usually notice I'm not eating meat when they are around the 6/7/8 year old mark - I never make a big deal about it or mention it but if they ask why I don't eat it I usually say because I don't like it and when they are older I go into more detail ( don't like eating animals - will only eat what I would kill, don't need it in your diet, environmental impact, animal cruelty etc ) none have ever really cared except can't understand why I don't eat sausage rolls!!!
    With DS I'm assuming the same, will go into more detail the older get gets , it's funny when I cook fish I might cook DH a steak and DS gets both, he prefers fish over meat so I may have a convert later on!

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    Hello, we have a similar situation in our house. I'm veggie and have been since I was 20 but DF is omni. He eats meat, he respects that I don't. DS has only started to ask recently and I don't think he's quite got it yet that meat is a dead animal. (We've explained that to him but I don't think he's really believed us.) At teh moment we've just told him that Mummy doesn't like meat so I don't eat it. When the time comes and he gets more inquisitive then I'll provide more information but until then he seems to be satisfied with this answer.

    Interestingly, DD doesn't seem to like meat and she prefers my veggie burgers and veggie ham.

    Both DD and DS eat meat and veggie meals. Our goal is that they believe that a veggie meal/diet is just as 'normal' as an omnivore diet.

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    darla87  (13-03-2013)

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    Thanks. Great to hear all your experiences with this.
    I guess the whole meat = dead animal concept is pretty advanced. With the exception of Wine Time's DS, it wouldn't seem real.

    I totally plan on being honest with him maybe "mummy doesn't like it, but daddy thinks its yum!"

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    I think i'll be the same as i'm in the same boat as you. I've been vego since i was 10 but I don't want to raise our little boy vego, i'd rather him have a variety in his diet and then should be choose to be vego when he's older he can. We buy all cruelty free/free range meat so i guess i'll just tell him that i don't like meat, whereas dad (who is a big carnivore) does. I don't want to sway him to be vego, but i do think its good when children are of the right age to explain to them where their food comes from.

    My brother and his wife turned vego in their 20's and raised their child a strict vegan but really didn't do a good job and always told him meat was bad. He's now 16 and he's quite judgmental of people who eat meat and in social situations like bbq's, he will make a big deal and go and sit in the car because he doesn't like the smell of the meat cooking. I think when he was little he associated bad food (i.e.) meat is eaten by "bad people". he always made that association as a child.

    I think with kids, its best when they are little to know food is just food, no emotional attachment and when they are the right age, you can honestly explain to them where the different foods come from and if they decide not to eat meat then it's their choice.
    Last edited by Clementine Grace; 13-03-2013 at 17:43.

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    Quote Originally Posted by darla87 View Post
    This isnt an issue yet, but I would like to hear the opinions and experiences of others.

    Im vegetarian. I have been since I was 5 and put two and two together about what I was eating. My non-vegetarian family were amazing and never forced me to eat meat. My reasons are a little different to most. Meat just grosses me out. The idea of consuming dead flesh, i find repulsive. Yet my DH eats meat which I am happy to prepare and watch him eat. Its just the idea of putting it into my body.

    I do believe that a healthy diet can include meat and have introduced my son (10m) to most red meats, chicken and fish. He loves them Although the reason for my diet isnt really ethical (more of a phobia) I still buy free range and ethically farmed products

    Now my question is, what happens when he realises I eat differently? Do I be honest "Well, you know how cows go moo? Well thats what you are eating, dead, cooked cow. Mummy thinks its gross and cant eat it".

    Has anyone had this, or something similar happen? How old will he be before he starts asking questions?
    The only thing I wouldn't say is that "it's gross". I'd say " I just don't like to eat meat because ..blah blah blah


 

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