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  1. #11
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    I had natural , emergency c, scheduled c and am planning on VBA2C when I have the next baby (not on cards yet).
    I did have VBAC as priority with my third but at 31-32 weeks I had major anxiety about going through with VBAC. I rang my OB immediately and had him book me in for C.
    At the time I was baffled as I was 90% on having the VBAC the 10% was just scared on the size of the baby as DS2 was 10pd6 hence the emergency c, he just would not come out.
    It turned out it was my instincts that brought me to the decision of a scheduled c with my third, had he been born Vaginally he likely would have died due to two large knots in his cord that where never picked up during ultrasounds.
    I put my instincts down to changing my mind and I am a strong believer in these instincts ever since.
    However 4th time around I have made sure to be healthy and fit. I have given myself an extra year to recover (I only wanted 2.5 years between all my kids I'm going for 3.5) I researched my odds, researched a supportive hospital and OB.
    I will do this
    In answer to recovery , my scheduled C pooped all over the emergency. I walked out the door of the hospital 48 hours later with a newborn, 2 kids and hubby already back to work and felt like it never happened, obviously besides a little pain but was totally manageable in comparison to not wanting to move for at least 2 weeks after emergency C.
    You will find anyone who has had an emergency then a scheduled will feel the same about a better recovery.
    As for VBAC. I say give it a go
    My friends had emergency with her first and two long successful VBAC births of 9pd2 and 10pd6 babies.
    I do believe the statistics are based on world wide and that the stats are strongly based on that of third world countries. I would be interested to see stats on Australia alone if anyone can fins them?
    Best of luck to you x

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    varusha  (12-03-2013)

  3. #12
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    I was in this same situation the last time. I was basically scared of both a vbac (because the first one was awful) and a c/section, because I'd had one and new what the pain was going to be like.

    I discussed it at length with the ob, and in the end decided to go for a c.section again. He was happy to leave the decision until the last minute so to speak. He said there are some good candidates for VBAC but he didn't think I was one of them. I have autoimmune arthritis which means my hips don't move etc etc.

    The c/section recovery for me personally was worse that my previous even though it was planned.

    It is a tough situation, I hated having the decision, I just wanted the Ob to say "you need to do it this way"

    Good luck.

  4. #13
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    I've been going through the same thing. Seriously, I've had more than 5 years to think about it and a decision is still so hard.

    From personal experience, OBs can be very varied in their support/lack of for VBAC. The OB I saw with DD just simply does not support VBAC, so if I never saw anyone else or sought another opinion I'm sure he would pull out every stat he could to support his beliefs.

    However since, as I was wheeled into theatre, the midwife was assuring me that just because I need a CS this time didn't mean I'd have to have one next time. That meant at my 6 week check and my OB point blank said "Once a CS always a CS", I knew he was wrong and found a new OB. Not that I had my heart set on a VBAC, I just wanted a supportive OB.

    So my GP-OB appts hadn't swayed me either way, he's totally supportive of either choice. But at the end of the day he might not even be there for the birth (I'm public so have a 1/3 chance it will be him on the day - if the midwives even think he's needed). I do remember at an earlier appointment though saying "maybe bub will be breech and decide for me" because it just seems so much easier to have the decision made for you!

    I wanted to wait for my hospital booking appt to see how supportive their attitude seemed to be. They barely batted an eyelid at the choice, to them it seems very routine - and this is not a large hospital either - so after that I feel more swayed towards a VBAC. They agreed that I am a perfect candidate for VBAC.

    I'm 26 weeks now and am not ruling out a CS. I am coping quite well with this pregnancy and if I continue to feel well I think I will stay keen on having a VBAC - however it is so hard to say how I will feel in another 10 weeks. Basically I won't be booking anything in a hurry.

    Sorry, not really advice, but I don't think you need to decide until it's really crunch time and then (as PP suggested) go with your instinct.

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    Rice  (30-03-2013)

  6. #14
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    OP I have no advice for you but just wanted to say I feel for you. I am in the same situation and currently 28weeks pregnant. My DDs birth was traumatic and ended in an emergency. C section as he heart rate was super slow and by the time we got to theatre there was barely a heartbeat. I heamoraged and had soon management issues so didnt get to see DD for over 3 hours. at this stage there is no reason why I can't try for a VBAC but I am scared of it ending in an emergency c section and everything being beyond my control again. I am pretty set on an elective because its more controlled and emotionally I think I will handle it better but then every few days I think 'am I making the right choice' and start stressing over it all over again.

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    varusha  (12-03-2013)

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    I had almost the same experience with my DD, though I didn't hemorrhage. My emergency c section wasn't fun (is birth ever?) but I did get to hold my DD immediately and once discharged i didn't use any painkillers.
    The control thing is important to me too. It would be awful to have my second child go through an emergency c section after a traumatic labour. On the flipside, who wouldn't want a smooth vaginal birth? No stitches, no pain afterwards! No adhesions/scar tissue.
    Seems like 50% decide on VBAC and then again 53% make it through successfully. With odds like that, no wonder so many of us are umming and ahhing .

  9. #16
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    I had a planned cs with my first - he was breech. My second I wanted VBAC - just for the simple fact there was no reason for a cs.

    The obst and middies were all supportive. I was an "unknown" because I had never experienced labour and so they didn't know how I would respond. I had to agree to close monitoring during my labour, but otherwise it was all lights green.

    There were three things that slowed me down during labour - nerves, fitness and an epidural. I hated the monitoring with passion, I had hurt my back during pregnancy and so the pain of that muscle was worse than the contraction pain and after being in-and-out of labour for 48 hours with no sleep I asked for an epidural.

    I think all would've gone okay if I had control of those three things. But alas (and alack), hindsight is 20-20. My labour was prolonged and in the end I had to be assisted with a vacuum, I had tearing, an episotomy and a haemorrhage. My recovery ended up being worse than my planned cs.

    On the day after DD's birth a midwife (trying to cheer me up) hugged me and said, "Well at least you got your VBAC!" I felt like replying, "Lady, I just had a 4.2kg baby pulled out of me, so many stitches the dr wouldn't tell me how many and 1.7L of my blood ended up on the floor. Tell me how this is good news?" I know my case was special, but a vaginal birth ISN'T always easy.

    (Please don't think I regret my VBAC, but I am not sugar-coating it just to score points with the "maternity police".)

    So my advice is that if you really really really feel you need a vaginal birth, then prepare. Don't go in half-hearted. It is hard work and sometimes it doesn't always work out. You may do EVERYTHING right and still end up with a cs. But a bad vaginal birth is about as bad as a planned cs - so why not go with the VBAC and give it a go?

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  11. #17
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    Midwives seem to be very pro VBAC and Obs not so much. I think Obs don't like being out of control of the situation. I strongly believe that if it was not a physical problem that caused you to have a Caesar previously (such as cephlopelvic disproportion, or problems with your cervix or uterus) then you should be able to have a VBAC successfully.

    I had my first Casear as bub was breech. I had so many people telling me VBACs were not possible, even today I have people tell me its impossible to have a VBAC even though I have successfully had one! I think there is a lot of false information out there.

    In my case my midwives were very anti VBAC and pressured me into having a Caesar as soon as I got to the hospital, and I almost gave in too, but then all of a sudden I was fully dilated and baby was ready to come out and I had no probs whatsoever!

    I think there are positives and negatives to Caesarian births and VBACS. My VBAC was more pleasant than my Ceasar and my Caesar was more pleasant than my first Vaginal delivery. Recovery is quicker with VBAC but you have more control with a Caesar. Some people think they don't bond with their baby the same with a Caesar but I strongly disagree. I bonded with all my babies the same. This time round I'm easy either way, planning for VBAC but totally ok if I need a Caesar.

    So I guess my advice is just go with whatever! If you want to have a VBAC then give it a go, and if you don't then dont worry about it, as long as bub comes out safe and sound and you are both well that is all that matters.

  12. #18
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    Subbing. Will reply properly after work tomorrow.

  13. #19
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    You really need a supportive caregiver. My OB was really supportive of a VBAC.
    Before I even fell pregnant I knew I wanted a VBAC after having a failed induction and emergency c-section under GA. I felt like if I could have a successful VBAC it would somehow make up for it slightly.
    But when I fell pregnant I got really scared and changed my mind quite a few times.
    The biggest decider for me was that even though it was my second pregnancy this was my last baby and last chance to experience a VB.
    And if I never tried I would always feel a sense of regret not knowing how it would have turned out, for me the risk was worth it.

    I was very fortunate to have a 4 hour uncomplicated VBAC that went as perfectly as it could. But if it hadn't have gone well atleast I would have known I gave it a shot.

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    I had an elective c section. The main reason why was so I could control the situation and avoid going through another traumatic birth. For me it was the best option and I loved it. No problems recovery wise and overall a wonderful birth experience. Good luck!


 

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