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  1. #11
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    I had supply issues and it took 6 weeks of worry and work .... It was all worth it. 7months later still enjoying breast feeding baby. It is a lovely experience once you get settled into it. We now also occasionally use formula as I am back at work and can't always express enough to leave ... S the formula is the back up supply. Bubba is happy with either but loves boobies
    if you can I think it is really worth trying BF ... Even if it takes a while, as it did with me.

  2. #12
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    Default Breast feeding vs Formula Feeding??

    It was bl00dy painful in the beginning for me, at the 4 week mark it started becoming enjoyable. The following helped me:
    - midwife staff being available for help 24/7 while in hospital
    - a good nursing pillow
    - a good supportive chair (glider chair was awesome for me)
    - lansinoh nipple cream
    - those gel pads you freeze then put down your bra

  3. #13
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    When I was in hospital I buzzed the nurses every time I feed and asked them to latch DD, then watch me latch and then finally just check that she was latched correctly. For me I didn't mind them getting "hands on" with the latching, but you may feel uncomfortable.

    Also ask about the different feeding positions and try all of them, as you never know when baby is going to be fussy and all it takes is to try another position for them to be happy.

    Also, they say if the baby has latched correctly, it shouldn't be painful. Lies!!! Even with correct latching the first few days/weeks are painful when they initially latch, but count to 20 and the pain subsides.

  4. #14
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    Default Breast feeding vs Formula Feeding??

    Thank you so much for all of your responses. I definitely want to go breast, as for me.. The benefits of breast are much better than formula. Also the cost of formula is a big thing, when I have a natural supply that costs me nothing - I really want to avoid having to spend lots of money on formula.

    I am finding this group is helping me a lot, as I can be very judgmental. I have a friend who has just given birth.. Her baby is less than a week old and she has given up on the breast already... She didn't go to any breast feeding classes or ask questions at the hospital. So I can't help but think it is a lack of knowledge that has made her give up. It's really hard not to try and tell her to stick at it, that its not meant to be easy...

    My sister in law breast feed and she will be a great support as she has told me of all the nights she sat there crying, wanting to give up. So I think it will really help to have someone pushing me to go through.

    Other suggestions have been not to have any bottles or formulas in the house so that I'm not tempted to just give the baby a bottle.

    For those of you who did switch to formula.. Did you consider mix feeding? Or was it formula exclusive.. And did the mid wives express their concern for not sticking with breast? I am going to RWBH and they are very very pro-breast feeding.

  5. #15
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    It really is different for everyone. I know people who had no issues at all. And I know others that had lots of issues. I would not worry before bubs even comes, you can only do your best. Give breastfeeding a good crack, if anything goes wrong book into to see the lactation consultant at your hospital. And if you do end up needed to formula feed. Don't beat yourself up about it.

  6. #16
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    I didn't have any bottles in the house, as I never entertained the thought of not breastfeeding. After 6 weeks of agonising pain, however I started to express full time. The lactation consultant could see that I had severe nipple vasospasm, I tried all the remedies and heat packs and so on, nothing worked. The pain was excruciating. It would last for hours during and after each feed. In the end I would just wish my baby would't wake up, we'd had a very traumatic birth as well. so I was referred to a rheumatologist where I found out I had multiple autoimmune diseases (yay for me!). I was really devastated and just cried for months. I ended up giving him 3 months of full time breastmilk. I felt a lot of guilt for a long time. When I got pregnant with the twins I was getting vasospasm before they even came out (that was the same with the bubs too) It was so painful, so I didn't even try and breastfeed, I pumped for 6 weeks full time for those bubs) That was hard. I was awake 90 minutes out of every 3 hours 24 hours a day for 6 weeks. But again, I am glad they got something. When my last one came I did the same, but for some reason my supply just died, I have no idea why it died this time and not the others? I have heard that pumping can cause your supply to drop.

    Anyhow, at the end of the day, my bubs were fed, loved and cared for!

  7. #17
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    BF did not work out for me, and I switched DD to formula after a few weeks of trying.

    My problem was low supply - nothing would come out when pumping, and she would get frustrated trying to feed - throwing her head back and crying. She continually lost weight each week. I tried Motilium, along with seeing various lactation consultants, 24hr skin to skin, pumping while she fed from a bottle, etc. It got to the point where we had no choice but to switch, due to the continued weight loss.

    It was a very distressing time for all of us, but she thrived on formula, and is now a happy and healthy 2.5yr old. I wish I could go back in time and undo all the time I wasted being upset about it. I'm going to try BF again when this baby is born, but really hope that I won't have the same feelings of failure and grief if it doesn't work out this time.

    After making the switch to formula with DD I found that things got better. DD gained weight and was happy. I found FF more convenient than BF, and it meant DH could do feeds too - which he loved.

    In answer to your question - no, I couldn't mix feed. There was simply no breast milk. The emotional toll of trying to do it for that long was having a terrible impact on us all, and it was the right thing for us to draw a line and make the switch. The midwives and LCs I spoke to advised us to make the switch at that point, so there was no issue there.

    Regarding your friend, I know you have said that you're trying not to be judgmental, but I would also say that every individual has to make the right decision for themselves and their family. It's not for anyone else to judge, as you never know all of the information in terms of what they've done and how they feel. I had a friend basically say to me that she thought I'd given up too soon, and she tried 'educating' me about things I should have done (all of which I had done - she just hadn't known). It really really upset me, and 2.5yrs on I still haven't forgotten that.

    Maybe your friend hasn't tried everything, or maybe she's tried everything she feels capable of trying. Maybe BF isn't as important to her as it is to you. Whatever her reasons, the last thing any new mum needs is for friends to be criticising their actions (even if you're not telling her exactly what you think). If you can, then just try to be there for her, and leave it to her to decide what she does with her body and her baby. We all do things about which others may feel 'I wouldn't have done that'.

  8. #18
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    Default Breast feeding vs Formula Feeding??

    Yeah. I haven't told her how I felt... And everyone on this forum who has switched to formula really really tried with the breast feeding. And basically had to switch to formula. I think the bit that annoys me is that she didn't go to classes & didn't ask her midwife about it. Cause I was asking her how she was finding breast feeding and she said it was fine.. Wasn't experiencing any pain etc. But she said that she didn't ask her midwives a lot so she didn't know what she was doing and she left the hospital within 12 hours of giving birth. So to me, it seems more like a lack of knowledge rather than low milk supply, etc. I am hoping I have no issues with not enough milk, as I would really like to be able to breast feed. But who knows.. There seem to be a lot of women who have issues, so I am not expecting it to be easy. I am glad I have done the research & I have a realistic expectation of breast feeding. Like, before falling pregnant I just assumed breast feeding was easy and the baby just jumps on and it's beautiful and easy. But it's so not like that -lol. And I think a realistic expectation is also going to help me through the nights where I want to give up. Parenting is definitely going to be a challenge for me.. Because I'm such a control freak and I really think I'm going to struggle if things don't go to plan. I know the lady who just posted (sorry didn't see your username) said you experienced a lot of emotions switching to formula.. I think I'll be the same if I have to. Will find it hard things not going to plan...

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by cassieh View Post
    Yeah. I haven't told her how I felt... And everyone on this forum who has switched to formula really really tried with the breast feeding. And basically had to switch to formula. I think the bit that annoys me is that she didn't go to classes & didn't ask her midwife about it. Cause I was asking her how she was finding breast feeding and she said it was fine.. Wasn't experiencing any pain etc. But she said that she didn't ask her midwives a lot so she didn't know what she was doing and she left the hospital within 12 hours of giving birth. So to me, it seems more like a lack of knowledge rather than low milk supply, etc. I am hoping I have no issues with not enough milk, as I would really like to be able to breast feed. But who knows.. There seem to be a lot of women who have issues, so I am not expecting it to be easy. I am glad I have done the research & I have a realistic expectation of breast feeding. Like, before falling pregnant I just assumed breast feeding was easy and the baby just jumps on and it's beautiful and easy. But it's so not like that -lol. And I think a realistic expectation is also going to help me through the nights where I want to give up. Parenting is definitely going to be a challenge for me.. Because I'm such a control freak and I really think I'm going to struggle if things don't go to plan. I know the lady who just posted (sorry didn't see your username) said you experienced a lot of emotions switching to formula.. I think I'll be the same if I have to. Will find it hard things not going to plan...
    BF may just not be something that's as important to her as it is to you. She may prefer FF - and if that works for her and her family then that's okay.

    She may also not want to talk to you (or anyone) about it or to have to explain herself.

    I guess what I'm trying to say is that it's not for anyone else to judge how hard someone else has tried, or what they should have done differently.

    A lot of women do find it tough, but not all. I have friends who swear they found it pretty straightforward - a little painful perhaps to start with, but nothing show stopping. Others for whom it didn't work out.

    I'd say that you're doing the right things by getting as much information as you can before you start, and trying to prepare yourself in case things don't go to plan.

    There is a lot of support on here if things don't work out as you'd hoped (both in terms of things you can try to help BF work, and also emotional support if you have to change to FF). Fingers crossed that you and baby will take to it without incident though!

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  11. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by cassieh View Post
    For those of you who did switch to formula.. Did you consider mix feeding? Or was it formula exclusive.. And did the mid wives express their concern for not sticking with breast? I am going to RWBH and they are very very pro-breast feeding.
    I mix fed until 3.5 months. From about 6wks formula was offered at room temperature so that they'd still find something good about the boob. But from 2 months I stopped BF and only did EBM and FF, as BF was taking about 12 hours a day, and I didn't feel there was enough time to also comp. with bottle, and settle bubs back to sleep, and express, and sleep, and eat, and toilet. Since they no longer had to expend energy at a nearly-dry boob, bubs started putting on more weight and reached the 3rd percentile by 3 months.

    I was a patient in hospital for 10 days, and only went home when bubs were discharged at 14 days. In that time the midwives spent more time lecturing me on how not everybody gets to breastfeed than they did trying to get my milk to come in. So definitely no concern from them about not sticking with breast.


 

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